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Old 07-12-2009, 06:51 PM
 
3,970 posts, read 11,827,348 times
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Unknown fact: There are palm trees in the Pacific Northwest...places like Medford and Roseburg, OR, Tri-Cities, WA, and even Seattle. Disclaimer: not common, however.
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Old 07-12-2009, 07:07 PM
 
5,969 posts, read 7,742,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TB Fla View Post
Your attempt to find all my posts and undermine me is Failing miserably Climate of Miami - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Maybe you should use better sources then Wikipedia,lol.

Climate in Miami, Florida
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Old 07-12-2009, 07:09 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loillon892 View Post
No, South Florida's climate is definitely tropical. Most of the rest of Florida does have a humid subtropical climate. I could pull up any number of sources that would prove this.
No it is not:

Climate in Miami, Florida
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Old 07-13-2009, 04:50 AM
 
Location: Hernando County, FL
8,488 posts, read 17,934,538 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DailyJournalist View Post
Miami's climate is not Tropical, it is Sub Tropical, there is a big difference.
Being Miami is 2 degrees above the Tropic of Cancer and nutation causes fluctuation in the earths tilt which can cause tropic zones to shift north and south could you explain this big difference.
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Old 07-13-2009, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Bergen County, NJ
594 posts, read 947,189 times
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Miami's climate is tropical, since avg. temperature is above 68 F/18 C in all months.

However, north of lake Ockehobee, places like Tampa, Orlando and north of it, it's subtropical.
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Old 07-13-2009, 10:45 AM
 
2,414 posts, read 4,990,752 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DailyJournalist View Post
Maybe you should use better sources then Wikipedia,lol.

Climate in Miami, Florida
Why don't you listen to the four people telling you different. You are making a fool of yourself arguing with Floridians about Florida's climate.

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Old 07-13-2009, 12:29 PM
 
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That's a cool map. I guess it would be safe to say that within each climate there is quite a bit of variation. For example, Orlando's climate is obviously not the same as Wash. DC, but they are in the same zone. Same with L.A. and San Francisco and many others.
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Old 07-13-2009, 01:12 PM
 
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The bulk of Florida is in the subtropical zone. But far southern Florida is tropical.
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Old 07-13-2009, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Bergen County, NJ
594 posts, read 947,189 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pw72 View Post
That's a cool map. I guess it would be safe to say that within each climate there is quite a bit of variation. For example, Orlando's climate is obviously not the same as Wash. DC, but they are in the same zone. Same with L.A. and San Francisco and many others.
Yes, I know it looks wierd because it's huge differences temperature wide.
For example, both LA and San Fran. has mediterreanean climate, because it has dry summers and wet winters.
Both D.C and Orlando has has humid subtropical because avg. low temp in coldest month is above 32 F/0C
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Old 07-13-2009, 01:30 PM
 
Location: IN
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Off-topic:

Does anyone know which US region has the most balsam fir trees?
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