U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 07-08-2009, 09:28 PM
 
6 posts, read 10,141 times
Reputation: 11

Advertisements

I am a recent college grad(although I'm 30 years old) and entering the dental hygiene field. My husband has extensive experience in various types of residential/light commercial construction. He has a decent job, and I am about to become employed. We have a 9 year old daughter.

Currently we live in a small city in northern Alabama, close to the city of Huntsville.

I have considered moving within the next 18 months for the following reasons:

1. The extreme heat and HUMIDITY. I have health issues that become very difficult during the summer

2. Salary. Dental hygiene pay here is tremendously lower than anywhere else in the u.s.

3. I live in a small town, but an unfriendly small minded town.

4. I'm ready for a change in scenery. I've lived here for 20 years and there isn't really anything holding me here.

I have considered Tennessee, as it is close, and has some beautiful landscape and friendly people. I lived there when I was younger. However, the heat and humidty may not be any better.

I considered North Carolina, but I know there can be heavy rainfall, and the cost of living in some of the nicer areas can be high.

I considered CO, but the snow is a concern.

At this point, I want a fresh start and am willing to consider anywhere, with the following criteria:

A. I do not want a hot climate, especially in combo with high humidity. I want mild summer temps-upper 80's is fine if hum. is low

B. Winter temps mid to upper 20's are fine in low humidity.

C. Precipitation-my husband does work outside, so this is an issue. I thought of Colorado, but I know there is a lot of snow-how much and how often is the key, and is it bad enough to severely effect building in the colder months?

D. Job market. Obvious. Construction does seem to be dwindling everywhere thanks to the tanking economy, but with my husand's experience he can do a wide variety of jobs. Dental hygiene is health related, so I hope to find a market for that, as well.

E. Cost of living-not just housing, but gas, food, utilities. We want to live modestly and save money. If I work full time I can make $50K, my husband, it depends on the type of employment(big or small company, etc.) but here he makes close to $40K. This really is important, because if my health ever starts to decline again, I want to be able to drop to part time hours and still be able to live on that and what my husband makes.

F. Housing-country, beautiful land, privacy. No apartments, sub divisions, etc. Would prefer 1-5 acres in the country. Small house or nice double wide manufactured home. Land, atmosphere, weather, and safety are important. Price is a factor.

G. Activity-outdoors, parks, lakes, fishing, boating, hiking. Would prefer to live close enough to a larger city than can provide shopping, restaurants, bars, music, etc.

H. Low crime area with friendly people.

I. Values. Hmmm...I'm from the south and have lived here my entire life. I am mostly conservative, but not crazy right wing insane.LOL. However, I don't want to go into culture shock. Basically, a fairly conservative area, but as long as the people are laid back and kind, I'm okay.


I would appreciate any advice to get me started in the right direction.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-09-2009, 12:25 AM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,238 posts, read 24,437,910 times
Reputation: 13010
Quote:
Originally Posted by janeeyre View Post
I considered CO, but the snow is a concern.

A. I do not want a hot climate, especially in combo with high humidity. I want mild summer temps-upper 80's is fine if hum. is low

B. Winter temps mid to upper 20's are fine in low humidity.

C. Precipitation-my husband does work outside, so this is an issue. I thought of Colorado, but I know there is a lot of snow-how much and how often is the key, and is it bad enough to severely effect building in the colder months?

F. Housing-country, beautiful land, privacy. No apartments, sub divisions, etc. Would prefer 1-5 acres in the country. Small house or nice double wide manufactured home. Land, atmosphere, weather, and safety are important. Price is a factor.

I. Values. Hmmm...I'm from the south and have lived here my entire life. I am mostly conservative, but not crazy right wing insane.LOL. However, I don't want to go into culture shock. Basically, a fairly conservative area, but as long as the people are laid back and kind, I'm okay.
This is regarding Colorado:

-When you say "Colorado", I assume Front Range (that's where most of the people live), that would range anywhere from Fort Collins to Pueblo, and includes Denver and Colorado Springs.

-The snow is only a concern in Colorado if it is snow-ing. When snow is already on the ground, it's not much of a problem and doesn't stay there long. However, there is the fairly rare day when the entire city shuts down due to snow/blizzard. We had 0 days like that in winter 2007, and 2 days like that in winter 2008 (in March!).

-Summers can be hot, but not humid.

-Expect winter temps to reach below zero several times a winter, but again, without humidity.

-I can't comment on the building situation in CO, but I would think that only a fairly heavy snowstorm would shut work down, but not for weeks on end. There are times it snows a few times a week, and times it doesn't snow for weeks (I'm talking between Oct-May here)

-Letter F would be nearly impossible, unless you wanted to live out east on the plains and commute.

Considering your criteria, I'll recommend Colorado Springs, with metro Denver coming in second. CS sounds more your style.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2009, 09:03 AM
 
6 posts, read 10,141 times
Reputation: 11
Default re:

Thanks for the reply. Here in the south, land can be acquired fairly easily along the countryside, and it is dirt cheap in some areas. Of course, there is a reason for that.

It's not so much that I mind having neighbors as that I don't want to live in a community where the homes are just iches apart. I don't want to live in an apartment complex either, and although I want to have friends and be sociable, i still enjoy peace and privacy.

I guess with the income in my household, that may be impossible in colorado.

Of course, I doubt I will find a state that will provide all that I ask, and i assume I'll have to give up one or more of my requests.

Last edited by janeeyre; 07-09-2009 at 09:12 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2009, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,238 posts, read 24,437,910 times
Reputation: 13010
Quote:
Originally Posted by janeeyre View Post
Thanks for the reply. Here in the south, land can be acquired fairly easily along the countryside, and it is dirt cheap in some areas. Of course, there is a reason for that.

It's not so much that I mind having neighbors as that I don't want to live in a community where the homes are just iches apart. I don't want to live in an apartment complex either, and although I want to have friends and be sociable, i still enjoy peace and privacy.

I guess with the income in my household, that may be impossible in colorado.
If you stay out of the newer subdivisions (<10 years old) you will have more space between your house/neighbors, and you could probably (considering your prospective income) be able to at least rent a nice house.

Unfortunately, any sort of nice country lifestyle (within driving distance to jobs) in CO is reserved for the better off, but I'm sure something could be found out on the plains east of Colorado Springs. But expect those properties to look (to the eyes) more like Kansas and less like Colorado. Not to mention, the commute (and occasional snow commute) you'd have to endure by living further out.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2009, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,238 posts, read 24,437,910 times
Reputation: 13010
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post
We had 0 days like that in winter 2007, and 2 days like that in winter 2008 (in March!).
Change that to winter 2007-2008, and winter 2008-2009.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-10-2009, 04:00 PM
 
6 posts, read 10,141 times
Reputation: 11
Default thanks

I appreciate the input. I think we are going to have to stay here a little longer, but I am looking more into Tennessee considering I am familiar with that part of the country. I know there is still humidity, but maybe I can find a city with a more mild climate in general, and I certainly would enjoy a huge spike in my salary. I am looking into the Knoxville area.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top