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Old 04-20-2007, 01:25 PM
 
Location: In God
3,073 posts, read 10,774,197 times
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I would have to say San Antonio. It's too big to not have enough to do. I would also say San Francisco. Yuck. I liked Oakland better.

I was very surprised to see so many people list Los Angeles. Now, as for Houston, lol don't even let that city's name come out of your mouth the wrong way:

That city is entirely too huge for anybody in this entire world to get nothing out of it. It's the New York of the south. Only difference is it's wide and not walkable, and it's hot. But it comes in second, only to NY, in a lot of things. The theatre, opera, ballet, symphony, humongous mall, top rated suburbs, the coolest nightlife, bars, inside recreational parks, international dining, gorgeous nature...downtown...ehhh it's getting there, but it's still very big with all those super skyscrapers across the city. Houston is the most surprising and shocking city in the world. Atleast to those who don't do their research before they come.

So if you didn't get anything out of Houston, you were obviously lost or stuck in your room.
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Old 04-20-2007, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Toledo
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I wasn't that impressed with New Orleans. The place is depressing (even before Katrina) and the heat is oppressive. My sister lived there for 6 years and hated it.
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Old 04-20-2007, 01:59 PM
 
1,486 posts, read 4,030,541 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yayoi View Post
I wasn't that impressed with New Orleans. The place is depressing (even before Katrina) and the heat is oppressive. My sister lived there for 6 years and hated it.
I would NEVER live there. Horrible place to live.

But, I think everyone has such a bad impression of the place, it does look slightly better. I just like the culture, the architecture, the food, and the Quarter. Very unique although I can see some people wouldn't like it.
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Old 04-20-2007, 02:04 PM
 
766 posts, read 2,271,383 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mpope409 View Post
I would have to say San Antonio. It's too big to not have enough to do. I would also say San Francisco. Yuck. I liked Oakland better.

I was very surprised to see so many people list Los Angeles. Now, as for Houston, lol don't even let that city's name come out of your mouth the wrong way:

That city is entirely too huge for anybody in this entire world to get nothing out of it. It's the New York of the south. Only difference is it's wide and not walkable, and it's hot. But it comes in second, only to NY, in a lot of things. The theatre, opera, ballet, symphony, humongous mall, top rated suburbs, the coolest nightlife, bars, inside recreational parks, international dining, gorgeous nature...downtown...ehhh it's getting there, but it's still very big with all those super skyscrapers across the city. Houston is the most surprising and shocking city in the world. Atleast to those who don't do their research before they come.

So if you didn't get anything out of Houston, you were obviously lost or stuck in your room.
When you compare L.A. in an absolute sense to other cities, it may seem to be fine. However, when looking at how L.A. is usually the first impression that the world has of the U.S., even more so than New York, the city really isn't that impressive. You kind of expect more out of a city that has such perceived importance. Meanwhile, I don't expect anything out of places like Gary or East St. Louis, so it's not like there's much to knock there.

I don't want to seem too harsh since it sounds like you're from Houston, but the urban planning there (or lack thereof) makes Atlanta look like a well-organized and compact city. There are certainly a lot of things to do there on paper, but as a Chicagoan, I'd have to highly beg to differ that Houston is 2nd only to New York in terms of culture and nightlife. The Houston suburbs are as fine as any other city's suburbs, but as an urban environment, it's just not the same as New York, Chicago, Boston, or San Francisco. To me, Houston feels like a large conglomeration of suburbs - that certainly doesn't mean it isn't a nice place to live speaking as someone that's now a suburbanite - so it's not a place that comes to mind when looking for an urban place to visit.
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Old 04-20-2007, 02:19 PM
 
Location: In God
3,073 posts, read 10,774,197 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank the Tank View Post

I don't want to seem too harsh since it sounds like you're from Houston, but the urban planning there (or lack thereof) makes Atlanta look like a well-organized and compact city. There are certainly a lot of things to do there on paper, but as a Chicagoan, I'd have to highly beg to differ that Houston is 2nd only to New York in terms of culture and nightlife. The Houston suburbs are as fine as any other city's suburbs, but as an urban environment, it's just not the same as New York, Chicago, Boston, or San Francisco. To me, Houston feels like a large conglomeration of suburbs - that certainly doesn't mean it isn't a nice place to live speaking as someone that's now a suburbanite - so it's not a place that comes to mind when looking for an urban place to visit.
Well I basically made all of the points you did about the sprawl, but you have to be very careful when you use the word urban. Urban does not mean compact, extremely dense, and walkable. Thus, Houston is indeed very urban, but it's not any of those mentioned things. They're working on it though. In building the city, it just wasn't necessary at the time to make it walkable.

Now I never said that Houston came second only to New York in culture and nightlife, but it does come second in a lot of things. Now as far as culture and nightlife go, it depends on what you like. Some people may think that Houston comes first in that department. Me for instance, I don't think that Boston and San Fransisco had enough black things to do, so they were dull and lacking in culture to me, but New York, Chicago, Houston, and Atlanta have a very very strong black heartbeat, so they will always be the top cities to me. Plus, Houston has a little something for EVERYBODY, so I have to wonder what part of town you were in that you didn't catch this.
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Old 04-20-2007, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Old Town Alexandria
14,505 posts, read 23,797,433 times
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Default I forgot to add-

Quote:
Originally Posted by ScrantonWilkesBarre View Post
Wait until Vasinger sees this! LOL!
Ft lauderdale (lol- but thats not a "real" city)
Miami
Charlotte, N.C.
Louisville and Lexington Kentucky.


I have to say some places considered a city in the sunbelt do not = what a person expects.
NYC, S.F., Chicago or Boston are real cities-to me. I haven't been to Houston but the heat would probably kill me!


sunny
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Old 04-20-2007, 02:25 PM
 
Location: In God
3,073 posts, read 10,774,197 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunnyhelena View Post
I haven't been to Houston but the heat would probably kill me!
You have to be tough as nails. Don't let it get the best of you, but it's actually very mild and windy down here right now.
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Old 04-20-2007, 02:25 PM
 
1,486 posts, read 4,030,541 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunnyhelena View Post
NYC, S.F., Chicago or Boston are real cities-to me. I haven't been to Houston but the heat would probably kill me!
DC is a city! (hah, hah...had to step up for my old home).

European-style, but still a city.
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Old 04-20-2007, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Old Town Alexandria
14,505 posts, read 23,797,433 times
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Default Is it...

Quote:
Originally Posted by mpope409 View Post
You have to be tough as nails. Don't let it get the best of you, but it's actually very mild and windy down here right now.

cosmopolitan? My brother lived there. I am looking for another city. I couldnt handle the S Florida heat-is it as bad as that?

Santa Monica has nice weather. I heard the cost of living is extreme there now, though.

D.C. is okay but I couldnt live there.
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Old 04-20-2007, 03:01 PM
 
766 posts, read 2,271,383 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mpope409 View Post
Well I basically made all of the points you did about the sprawl, but you have to be very careful when you use the word urban. Urban does not mean compact, extremely dense, and walkable. Thus, Houston is indeed very urban, but it's not any of those mentioned things. They're working on it though. In building the city, it just wasn't necessary at the time to make it walkable.

Now I never said that Houston came second only to New York in culture and nightlife, but it does come second in a lot of things. Now as far as culture and nightlife go, it depends on what you like. Some people may think that Houston comes first in that department. Me for instance, I don't think that Boston and San Fransisco had enough black things to do, so they were dull and lacking in culture to me, but New York, Chicago, Houston, and Atlanta have a very very strong black heartbeat, so they will always be the top cities to me. Plus, Houston has a little something for EVERYBODY, so I have to wonder what part of town you were in that you didn't catch this.
I've stayed in downtown next door to the convention center and then also spent some time in the suburbs. It wasn't as though I had a negative experience - it's just that when the downtown core is more of an afterthought compared to the rest of the area, it doesn't provide a great first impression.

I guess you're right that an urban area doesn't necessarily mean that it's walkable and dense (L.A. isn't walkable yet it certainly is urban), but I think when you look at the places that have the most active and vibrant urban cores, they almost always have the walkability and density characteristics. Lots of places have sports teams, fine restaurants, bars, symphonies, theater, museums, etc. However, it's the places that offer all of those items in an environment where you can also work and live and then access all of that without even getting into a car that I consider to be a cut above as cities. I live in the suburbs now, so when I want to go to a city, I really want it to truly be a city as opposed to a quasi-suburb.
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