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Old 05-30-2007, 11:22 AM
 
301 posts, read 1,266,653 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wowimsouthern View Post
i agree totally with you about hick stereotypes , it seems to me that Hollywood t v the press radio or anyone can say what ever they darn well please about white southerners and it's fine. the mockery the hateful insults never cease. but at a time when we must watch our every word least we offend some spacial guv't group. it's vicious and stupid.
I can see where you're coming from, and I can somewhat feel your pain. Hollywood just protray white Southerners as ignorant and backwards, they don't show the many Scientist, Novelist, and Artist that come from the South.

Some people are just ignorant when it comes to the South and sadly I don't think this will change for a awhile. For example on the new poll regaurding rather or not Louisville is Southern, some people say that because Louisville is not the spliting image of mayberry it just can't be Southern. They don't take into account places like Houston, New Orleans, Richmond, Va beach, while they have unique traits to the South they certainly are Southern.

 
Old 05-30-2007, 11:32 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,904,816 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
The highway of hell. That is the most boring drive in America....besides I 70 in Kansas lol. When you are driving north towards Chicago and you see the mielage chart that says its 395 miles to Chicago, you immediately start to go in depression.
I-55 through Illinois between St. Louis and Chicago is pretty boring too. As is I-70 throughout it's journey through Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio. Areas along I-70 throughtout these four states fit the negative images people give of the midwest...except for the cities along I-70, nothing but cornfields mostly in the country. it's not quite as boring as Kansas but it's certainly not I-44 through Missouri! That is a far more scenic drive through more mountainous and hilly terrain. If you're looking for a boring drive throughout the U.S., I-57 in Illinois and most of I-70 throughout Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio generally fit the bill pretty well IMO. I-55 in Illinois is not much more interesting than I-57...at least there are more metro areas along the way. The advantage of I-57 over I-55 if you are going from Memphis to Chicago is that I-57 not only provides a more direct route between Memphis and Chicago but it also avoids the heavy traffic encountered at St. Louis. As for the map, I again would vote to put the transition area slightly below St. Louis, as i think St. Louis, St. Louis County,Franklin County, and St. Charles County and the areas/counties immediately around it (Jefferson County,MO), (St. Clair County,IL),(St. Madison County), basically any county touching St. Louis County qualify as Midwestern. Once firmly outside of these counties I think is where the transition begins. (assuming you are going southeast on I-64, south on I-55, or southwest on I-44. THis map is pretty accurate, I'd just extend as DefaultAlias said the transition zone in Illinois just a tad south of the St. Louis Metro Area. But generally that map of the four states is pretty accurate, and this theory only extends the northern boundary of the southern transition zone maybe a county or two to the south. It seems to me that Cincinnati, Kansas City, and St. Louis are the southernmost major Midwestern cities and that Louisville and Lexington are the northernmost major Southern cities. I might generally extend the Midwest boundaries of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky all a bit further to the south, but just a tad. I think the part of Kentucky (Kenton County) where the Cincy suburbs are should definitely count as the Midwest. But anyway, this map is pretty accurate, certainly between 95-100%.

Last edited by ajf131; 05-30-2007 at 12:02 PM..
 
Old 05-30-2007, 11:57 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,904,816 times
Reputation: 660
[quote=ajf131;797923]I-55 through Illinois between St. Louis and Chicago is pretty boring too. As is I-70 throughout it's journey through Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio. Areas along I-70 throughtout these four states fit the negative images people give of the midwest...except for the cities along I-70, nothing but cornfields mostly in the country. it's not quite as boring as Kansas but it's certainly not I-44 through Missouri! That is a far more scenic drive through more mountainous and hilly terrain. If you're looking for a boring drive throughout the U.S., I-57 in Illinois and most of I-70 throughout Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio generally fit the bill pretty well IMO. I-55 in Illinois is not much more interesting than I-57...at least there are more metro areas along the way. The advantage of I-57 over I-55 if you are going from Memphis to Chicago is that I-57 not only provides a more direct route between Memphis and Chicago but it also avoids the heavy traffic encountered at St. Louis. As for the map, I again would vote to put the transition area slightly below St. Louis, as i think St. Louis, St. Louis County,Franklin County, and St. Charles County and the areas/counties immediately around it (most of Jefferson County and Franklin County,MO), (St. Clair County,IL),(Madison County), basically any county touching St. Louis County I think qualifies as Midwestern or something pretty close to it. Once firmly outside of these counties I think is where the transition begins. (assuming you are going southeast on I-64, south on I-55, or southwest on I-44. THis map is pretty accurate, I'd just extend as DefaultAlias said the transition zone in Illinois just a tad south of the St. Louis Metro Area. But generally that map of the four states is pretty accurate, and this theory only extends the northern boundary of the southern transition zone maybe a county or two to the south. It seems to me that Cincinnati, Kansas City, and St. Louis are the southernmost major Midwestern cities and that Louisville and Lexington are the northernmost major Southern cities.
 
Old 05-30-2007, 08:12 PM
 
Location: Nashville
81 posts, read 296,903 times
Reputation: 51
[quote=ajf131;798105]
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
I-55 through Illinois between St. Louis and Chicago is pretty boring too. As is I-70 throughout it's journey through Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio. Areas along I-70 throughtout these four states fit the negative images people give of the midwest...except for the cities along I-70, nothing but cornfields mostly in the country. it's not quite as boring as Kansas but it's certainly not I-44 through Missouri! That is a far more scenic drive through more mountainous and hilly terrain. If you're looking for a boring drive throughout the U.S., I-57 in Illinois and most of I-70 throughout Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio generally fit the bill pretty well IMO. I-55 in Illinois is not much more interesting than I-57...at least there are more metro areas along the way. The advantage of I-57 over I-55 if you are going from Memphis to Chicago is that I-57 not only provides a more direct route between Memphis and Chicago but it also avoids the heavy traffic encountered at St. Louis. As for the map, I again would vote to put the transition area slightly below St. Louis, as i think St. Louis, St. Louis County,Franklin County, and St. Charles County and the areas/counties immediately around it (most of Jefferson County and Franklin County,MO), (St. Clair County,IL),(Madison County), basically any county touching St. Louis County I think qualifies as Midwestern or something pretty close to it. Once firmly outside of these counties I think is where the transition begins. (assuming you are going southeast on I-64, south on I-55, or southwest on I-44. THis map is pretty accurate, I'd just extend as DefaultAlias said the transition zone in Illinois just a tad south of the St. Louis Metro Area. But generally that map of the four states is pretty accurate, and this theory only extends the northern boundary of the southern transition zone maybe a county or two to the south. It seems to me that Cincinnati, Kansas City, and St. Louis are the southernmost major Midwestern cities and that Louisville and Lexington are the northernmost major Southern cities.
The stretch of I-70 between Terre Haute and Indy is tolerable, IMO. The gently rolling hills along with the turns and the patches of forestry in between tend to break up the monotony of Indiana highways and add some variety to the drive, which is good. Now, the stretch of I-55 between Cairo and Memphis is undoubtedly THE most boring stretch of highway I have ever driven on. It's not like other boring highways because on this one, there's nothing out there and it seems endless because the highway is perfectly flat and perfectly straight...

And back to the map for a sec...I agree with ajf and maybe move the transition zone a few miles south so that all of the St. Louis area counties lie in the Midwest zone, and move Dixie up a few miles in Kentucky...but the rest of Dixie is pretty accurately depicted though. Keep in mind the map is just an overall generalization and I think it's fairly accurate.
 
Old 05-30-2007, 08:22 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,003 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by DefaultAlias View Post
^^I suppose you're right after looking at the map; the Midwestern zone could be extended a hair or two further south

And extreme Southern Illinois and Indiana, like around the Cairo area is fairly Dixie...I saw some of those slash pine trees you find in the South driving along I-55 just before Cairo and they instantly reminded me of the South.
I definitely think the midwestern zone should be extended south through Illinois. I think the area of Ill designated as 'southern' should really be transitional. Illinois is the north! Ditto for Indiana. Even culturally.
 
Old 05-30-2007, 08:49 PM
 
Location: Nashville
81 posts, read 296,903 times
Reputation: 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by pittnurse70 View Post
I definitely think the midwestern zone should be extended south through Illinois. I think the area of Ill designated as 'southern' should really be transitional. Illinois is the north! Ditto for Indiana. Even culturally.
Oh I beg to differ! The only thing Northern about Cairo and Evansville (two cities in the Dixie zone of northern states) is their architectural styles, and the fact that they've seen substantial rust-belt like decline. Otherwise, Cairo couldn't be more Dixie unless it was literally dropped off in Alabama somewhere!
 
Old 05-30-2007, 08:53 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,003 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by DefaultAlias View Post
Oh I beg to differ! The only thing Northern about Cairo and Evansville (two cities in the Dixie zone of northern states) is their architectural styles, and the fact that they've seen substantial rust-belt like decline. Otherwise, Cairo couldn't be more Dixie unless it was literally dropped off in Alabama somewhere!
Well, 'northern' and 'southern' are about architecture and their respective economies, no? Although I do think Evansville and Cairo are close to southern. But they are in northern states.
 
Old 05-30-2007, 10:10 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,904,816 times
Reputation: 660
[quote=DefaultAlias;801632]
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post

The stretch of I-70 between Terre Haute and Indy is tolerable, IMO. The gently rolling hills along with the turns and the patches of forestry in between tend to break up the monotony of Indiana highways and add some variety to the drive, which is good. Now, the stretch of I-55 between Cairo and Memphis is undoubtedly THE most boring stretch of highway I have ever driven on. It's not like other boring highways because on this one, there's nothing out there and it seems endless because the highway is perfectly flat and perfectly straight...

And back to the map for a sec...I agree with ajf and maybe move the transition zone a few miles south so that all of the St. Louis area counties lie in the Midwest zone, and move Dixie up a few miles in Kentucky...but the rest of Dixie is pretty accurately depicted though. Keep in mind the map is just an overall generalization and I think it's fairly accurate.

Default, I think you mean I-57 when you talk about the stretch of highway going through Cairo. Cairo is well to the southeast of St. Louis in Illinois and I-55 enters Missouri at St. Louis then parallels the Mississippi south through Missouri until it enters Arkansas. I-57 I think is the interstate highway you are referring to. I-57 goes through Cairo, meets I-24, then crosses the southwestern-most tip of Illinois into far southeast Missouri, where it ends at I-55. In any case I agree that Cairo is pretty boring...however, where I-24 begins is just north of where the Shawnee Forest in Illinois lies and where the Ohio River bluffs are. Take I-24 east and you begin to encounter very hilly and very cliffy, mountainous terrain...not unlike some parts of the Ozarks in Missouri...and fact these are called the Illinois Ozarks I believe....
 
Old 05-30-2007, 10:23 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,904,816 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by pittnurse70 View Post
I definitely think the midwestern zone should be extended south through Illinois. I think the area of Ill designated as 'southern' should really be transitional. Illinois is the north! Ditto for Indiana. Even culturally.
I strongly disagree. One of my best friends is from Carbondale, Illinois, which lies right at the convergence of Dixie and the Midwest-South transition zone. People there have a very noticeable twang, and use terms like y'all and I'm fixin' quite often. Plus sweet tea exists at every restaurant there. That part of Illinois is something like only maybe 40 miles or so north of Paducah, which is unquestionably Southern.Paducah is noticeably more Southern than Louisville, there is nothing Midwestern about that area, not even a few characteristics. which is also Southern but definitely part of the Upper South. From Carbondale down south makes up maybe about 5% of Illinois at most. Even Southern Indiana around Louisville is more Southern than Midwestern I'd have to say. And it does make sense considering these parts of Illinois and Indiana basically skirt the Ohio River. Missouri does not become definitively Southern until around the latitude where the OHio River flows into the Mississippi. that is roughly on the upper boundary of the Southern quarter of Missouri. The Ohio River i've always felt has been a pretty good overall divider between the Midwest and South...until I saw Default Alias' map that is hehehe
 
Old 05-30-2007, 10:29 PM
 
301 posts, read 1,266,653 times
Reputation: 174
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
I strongly disagree. One of my best friends is from Carbondale, Illinois, which lies right at the convergence of Dixie and the Midwest-South transition zone. People there have a very noticeable twang, and use terms like y'all and I'm fixin' quite often. Plus sweet tea exists at every restaurant there. That part of Illinois is something like only maybe 40 miles or so north of Paducah, which is unquestionably Southern.Paducah is noticeably more Southern than Louisville, there is nothing Midwestern about that area, not even a few characteristics. which is also Southern but definitely part of the Upper South. From Carbondale down south makes up maybe about 5% of Illinois at most. Even Southern Indiana around Louisville is more Southern than Midwestern I'd have to say. And it does make sense considering these parts of Illinois and Indiana basically skirt the Ohio River. Missouri does not become definitively Southern until around the latitude where the OHio River flows into the Mississippi. that is roughly on the upper boundary of the Southern quarter of Missouri. The Ohio River i've always felt has been a pretty good overall divider between the Midwest and South...until I saw Default Alias' map that is hehehe
LOL try telling them this on the thread in the Kentucky forum. Some people will try to find any excuse to not label Louisville Southern (with that they'd rather call Kentucky border) it makes no sense IMO.
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