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Old 05-31-2007, 09:00 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,903,922 times
Reputation: 660

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[quote=Louisvilleslugger;804727]
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post


Some people in the Kentucky forums treat St. Louis as though it's Louisville twin, which must of us know isn't true.
Well guess those people from KY have never been here. The only two things those cities share in common right now are that they are river cities and were both named from King Louis. that's pretty much it...hehehe. St. Louis' twins IMO are Cincinnati and Kansas City...these three cities are Midwestern and north of the Mason-Dixon. Louisville is Southern. Yes it's not the Lower Midwest or the Deep South...it's part of the Upper South. Other cities in this region are Lexington, Richmond, Nashville, Raleigh, Charlotte, etc. Louisville definitely belongs in a category with these cities. St. Louis belongs with Indianapolis, Columbus, Kansas City, and Cincinnati.

 
Old 05-31-2007, 10:16 PM
 
301 posts, read 1,266,604 times
Reputation: 174
[quote=ajf131;808179]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Louisvilleslugger View Post

Well guess those people from KY have never been here. The only two things those cities share in common right now are that they are river cities and were both named from King Louis. that's pretty much it...hehehe. St. Louis' twins IMO are Cincinnati and Kansas City...these three cities are Midwestern and north of the Mason-Dixon. Louisville is Southern. Yes it's not the Lower Midwest or the Deep South...it's part of the Upper South. Other cities in this region are Lexington, Richmond, Nashville, Raleigh, Charlotte, etc. Louisville definitely belongs in a category with these cities. St. Louis belongs with Indianapolis, Columbus, Kansas City, and Cincinnati.
I couldn't agree more with your statement.
 
Old 06-01-2007, 12:02 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,903,922 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by pittnurse70 View Post
ajf131 What is with this sweet tea business? They have sweet tea in Omaha, for Pete's sake.

In regards to Paducah, it is in Kentucky. And I know people from Carbondale, IL who do not have southern accents. It's a mixed area. Illinois, all of it, is the Land of Lincoln! It is NOT southern.
Sweet tea is a distinct characteristic of the South. If it's in Omaha, I'm guessing it's in a Cracker Barrel or something like that....rarely outside of the South is sweet tea served in restaurants other than aCracker Barrel or maybe a Waffle House, only Waffle House I ever went to was years ago in Tampa and I don't remember if it had sweet tea or not, probably did since Tampa is south. Areas that strongly promote sweet tea generally are unquestionably Dixie. And if even the Southernmost parts of Illinois have to be considered mixed, so do the parts of southern Missouri which is right across the Mississippi from those areas. Perryville, MO and Carbondale have noticeable Dixie elements to them, too much to be dismissed IMO. These two may not officially be Dixie per se, but they definitely I think are too Dixie to be considered just like the Midwestern parts of their states. and they lie in the lower parts of the Midwest-Southern transition zone. If Illinois cannot be considered Southern in these areas, than neither can the regions of Missouri due west of these IMO...most of Southern Missouri below St. Louis which is west of Southern Illinois changes culture concurrently with Southern illinois. Southern Missouri becomes truly Dixie a bit before Southern Illinois ends at the Ohio River, and if not at the latitudes of Carbondale and Perryville, very very close to them.

Last edited by ajf131; 06-01-2007 at 12:11 AM..
 
Old 06-01-2007, 11:12 AM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,048,152 times
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Louisvilleslugger: "...because Louisville is not the spliting image of mayberry it just can't be Southern."

As one lived in the South and has traveled extensively around it, I always thought Mayberry was a bogus representation. I mean, was there ever a black person in sight in any of the scenes of that show, even a face in a crowd or a kid in Opie's class? If there is a town of any size in the South that doesn't have a black population, I haven't seen it!

(And what was the deal with "Aint Bea"? Her accent sounded New England to me! )
 
Old 06-01-2007, 11:20 AM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,048,152 times
Reputation: 3482
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
Sweet tea is a distinct characteristic of the South. If it's in Omaha, I'm guessing it's in a Cracker Barrel or something like that....rarely outside of the South is sweet tea served in restaurants other than aCracker Barrel or maybe a Waffle House, only Waffle House I ever went to was years ago in Tampa and I don't remember if it had sweet tea or not, probably did since Tampa is south. Areas that strongly promote sweet tea generally are unquestionably Dixie. And if even the Southernmost parts of Illinois have to be considered mixed, so do the parts of southern Missouri which is right across the Mississippi from those areas. Perryville, MO and Carbondale have noticeable Dixie elements to them, too much to be dismissed IMO. These two may not officially be Dixie per se, but they definitely I think are too Dixie to be considered just like the Midwestern parts of their states. and they lie in the lower parts of the Midwest-Southern transition zone. If Illinois cannot be considered Southern in these areas, than neither can the regions of Missouri due west of these IMO...most of Southern Missouri below St. Louis which is west of Southern Illinois changes culture concurrently with Southern illinois. Southern Missouri becomes truly Dixie a bit before Southern Illinois ends at the Ohio River, and if not at the latitudes of Carbondale and Perryville, very very close to them.
I've been ignoring this sweet tea thing for quite awhile, but wanted to add to the discussion. My Aunt Ann, a German-Catholic who was born and raised in the city of Baltimore (she pronounced it "Bawlimer"), always served sweet tea when we'd visit from "up North" (upstate NY). I had never had it anywhere else. So after reading all these posts on this and similar threads, I'm confused. How could she give us sweet tea when she couldn't possibly be a Southerner since she was a) Catholic; b) German extraction; c) a native of Maryland? (She also made the greatest fried chicken I've ever had. She firied it in bacon grease!)
 
Old 06-01-2007, 03:29 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,903,922 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
I've been ignoring this sweet tea thing for quite awhile, but wanted to add to the discussion. My Aunt Ann, a German-Catholic who was born and raised in the city of Baltimore (she pronounced it "Bawlimer"), always served sweet tea when we'd visit from "up North" (upstate NY). I had never had it anywhere else. So after reading all these posts on this and similar threads, I'm confused. How could she give us sweet tea when she couldn't possibly be a Southerner since she was a) Catholic; b) German extraction; c) a native of Maryland? (She also made the greatest fried chicken I've ever had. She firied it in bacon grease!)
BenAround, that's not what I'm saying here. It doesn't make you a southerner to favor sweet tea. I'm saying generally areas where sweet tea is served in every restaurant you go to tend to be either part of Dixie, and if they're not, they're usually not very far North of Dixie. I'm just speaking from experience. generally areas where you find sweet tea that are not considered part of the South (officially, at least) are the southern parts of Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, I don't know about Ohio but I'm guessing there might be some sweet tea there, the southern part of West Virginia, and honestly if it's in maryland, considering Maryland borders Virginia, it's not surprising it found its way up there given how small a state Maryland is. I have never been to any Midwestern city that serves sweet tea in most of its restaurants. Cincinnati, St. Louis, and Kansas City do not serve it in their chain restaurants nor their famous ones. Only ones that do serve sweet tea tend are either Cracker Barrels or Waffle Houses, which serve Southern cuisine anywhere...I understand the one in St. Paul may not, that's the only one I've heard about that doesn't serve it. In the Lower Midwest those restaurants tend to serve it, i know Cracker Barrels do. Any individual citizen doesn't have to be Southern to favor sweet tea or serve it to guests. An entire city, on the other hand, that strongly promotes sweet tea generally is Dixie. No Midwestern or northern city in general has sweet tea, and if they do, it's service is very limited to restaurants transplanted from the South and thus it's generally not favored. Sweet tea is part of a Southern tradition, a city that usually makes it widely available in its restaurants is in Dixie over 90% of the time. believe me, I've been all over the U.S. practically now and very very rarely have I seen areas outside of the South that serve sweet tea in restaurants other than Cracker Barrel or Waffle Houses. i'm honestly unsure if Waffle Houses even serve it everywhere outside the South.
 
Old 06-01-2007, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Alabama!
5,849 posts, read 15,940,607 times
Reputation: 4348
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Louisvilleslugger: "...because Louisville is not the spliting image of mayberry it just can't be Southern."

As one lived in the South and has traveled extensively around it, I always thought Mayberry was a bogus representation. I mean, was there ever a black person in sight in any of the scenes of that show, even a face in a crowd or a kid in Opie's class? If there is a town of any size in the South that doesn't have a black population, I haven't seen it!

(And what was the deal with "Aint Bea"? Her accent sounded New England to me! )
My parents grew up in the mountains of North Carolina...only 1 black family in the county. Still very few African-Americans there.
 
Old 06-01-2007, 03:38 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,903,922 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
I've been ignoring this sweet tea thing for quite awhile, but wanted to add to the discussion. My Aunt Ann, a German-Catholic who was born and raised in the city of Baltimore (she pronounced it "Bawlimer"), always served sweet tea when we'd visit from "up North" (upstate NY). I had never had it anywhere else. So after reading all these posts on this and similar threads, I'm confused. How could she give us sweet tea when she couldn't possibly be a Southerner since she was a) Catholic; b) German extraction; c) a native of Maryland? (She also made the greatest fried chicken I've ever had. She firied it in bacon grease!)
Well you have to remember Maryland has historical ties to the South, but that's probably not the reason why. I'm guessing because Maryland is such a small state and borders Virginia it wouldn't surprise me if there was some overlap of sweet tea.
 
Old 06-01-2007, 04:14 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,996 posts, read 102,581,357 times
Reputation: 33059
Actually, they serve sweet tea in Belgium! Was just there a month ago.
 
Old 06-01-2007, 04:27 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,903,922 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by pittnurse70 View Post
Actually, they serve sweet tea in Belgium! Was just there a month ago.
Really? wow. Still, for the U.S., my statement applies.
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