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Old 06-01-2007, 07:34 PM
 
5,857 posts, read 14,041,383 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Southlander View Post
My parents grew up in the mountains of North Carolina...only 1 black family in the county. Still very few African-Americans there.
Interesting, Southlander. I'm guessing because there were no slaveowners in the mountains is why no black communities there today?

 
Old 06-01-2007, 07:58 PM
 
Location: 602/520
2,441 posts, read 6,118,248 times
Reputation: 1815
Quote:
Well you have to remember Maryland has historical ties to the South, but that's probably not the reason why. I'm guessing because Maryland is such a small state and borders Virginia it wouldn't surprise me if there was some overlap of sweet tea.
Many restaurants in southcentral Pennsylvania, chain and family, serve sweet tea. You have to remember that some areas are as little as an hour away from the northern border of Virginia (Maryland is a very narrow state in some areas). Also, many southerners likely visit Gettysburg to see the battlefield, providing the clientele that likely consumes the tea. Interestingly, McDonalds offerns sweet tea in Pennsylvania, as far north as State College and Allentown. So, in short, I really don't believe the prevalance of sweet tea is a true marker of what is southern and what is not.

Pennsylvania also has many foods that are considered "southern," but are staples, especially in the PA Dutch communities. These include grits, scrapple, and hog maws. Many of these foods are somehow widely considered southern, even though many of these recipes originated in Pennsylvania.
 
Old 06-01-2007, 08:04 PM
 
134 posts, read 401,401 times
Reputation: 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
Well you have to remember Maryland has historical ties to the South, but that's probably not the reason why. I'm guessing because Maryland is such a small state and borders Virginia it wouldn't surprise me if there was some overlap of sweet tea.
I agree. I was in Maryland recently and it does have some southern influence. Heck, I even hear some reminants of the southern accent in Pennsylvania (well actually the areas immediately above MD and WV...I'm sure there's some moving back and forth).

Just from my observations, people in the northern states usually refer to Maryland as a southern state and people in the south refer to it as a northern state. Although I am from a southern state, I can see southern elements in Maryland, but I still consider it northern overall.
 
Old 06-01-2007, 10:23 PM
 
Location: Baton Rouge
369 posts, read 1,496,873 times
Reputation: 207
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
I've been ignoring this sweet tea thing for quite awhile, but wanted to add to the discussion. My Aunt Ann, a German-Catholic who was born and raised in the city of Baltimore (she pronounced it "Bawlimer"), always served sweet tea when we'd visit from "up North" (upstate NY). I had never had it anywhere else. So after reading all these posts on this and similar threads, I'm confused. How could she give us sweet tea when she couldn't possibly be a Southerner since she was a) Catholic; b) German extraction; c) a native of Maryland? (She also made the greatest fried chicken I've ever had. She firied it in bacon grease!)
Louisiana, Florida, South Mississippi, South Alabama, and East Texas have pretty big Catholic Populations
 
Old 06-01-2007, 11:41 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,899,356 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by holloway1010 View Post
Louisiana, Florida, South Mississippi, South Alabama, and East Texas have pretty big Catholic Populations
Good point. Catholicism is not simply a thing limited to the North. It's everywhere in the U.S. Although I would've expected these states to be larger in Southern Baptists overall?
 
Old 06-02-2007, 08:30 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,527,356 times
Reputation: 33045
I tried ignoring the sweet tea thing, too, because it seems like a diversion. However, if sweet tea is just unique to the south, why is it sold in stores and vending machines everywhere (that I have been, anyway)? Putting sugar in your tea is an old time custom that seems to come from Britain, and seems to be a matter of taste.
 
Old 06-02-2007, 11:08 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,899,356 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by pittnurse70 View Post
I tried ignoring the sweet tea thing, too, because it seems like a diversion. However, if sweet tea is just unique to the south, why is it sold in stores and vending machines everywhere (that I have been, anyway)? Putting sugar in your tea is an old time custom that seems to come from Britain, and seems to be a matter of taste.
Pittnurse, it has nothing to do with even putting sugar in your tea. It is how sweet tea is made that makes it distinct. Iced tea with two bags of equal in it is NOT sweet tea. Sweet tea is created when the sugar is poured into the tea while it is made. This essentially allows for a true merger of the sugar and the tea...the sugar essentially is uniformly distributed throughout the tea and doesn't simply sink to the bottom. Sweet tea is not unique to the south anymore, but you can order it in every restaurant you go to there and apart from stores and vending machines you generally can't get it in areas outside of Dixie. I've never found it from either of these places to be like the "real" sweet tea you find in Dixie. In the South, sweet tea is available everywhere. In the North it's available only in the places you mentioned...I'm not even sure i agree that it's available in many vending machines or stores. St. Louis hardly has any sweet tea except in Cracker Barrels and maybe Waffle Houses. Can't find it anywhere else here. Stores have it but it's hard to find.
 
Old 06-02-2007, 11:24 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,527,356 times
Reputation: 33045
Thank you for your sweet tea recipe. You can buy sweetened canned and bottled tea in the grocery stores around Denver.
 
Old 06-02-2007, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Nashville
81 posts, read 296,753 times
Reputation: 51
Does Nestea count as sweet tea?
 
Old 06-02-2007, 12:43 PM
 
Location: from houstoner to bostoner to new yorker to new jerseyite ;)
4,085 posts, read 11,449,721 times
Reputation: 1942
As an April Fool's Day joke in 2003, Georgia State Representative John Noel and four co-sponsors introduced House Bill 819:

* (a) As used in this Code section, the term 'sweet tea' means iced tea which is sweetened with sugar at the time that it is brewed.
* (b) Any food service establishment which serves iced tea must serve sweet tea. Such an establishment may serve unsweetened tea but in such case must also serve sweet tea.
* (c) Any person who violates this Code section shall be guilty of a misdemeanor of a high and aggravated nature.

Sweet tea - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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