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Old 06-06-2007, 12:21 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,904,816 times
Reputation: 660

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Any state that has Winn-Dixie grocery stores is truly Southern. Kentucky meets these requirements perfectly. Not a single Winn-Dixie in Missouri that I've found yet. Every southern state has a Winn-Dixie.

 
Old 06-06-2007, 12:56 AM
 
Location: Baton Rouge
369 posts, read 1,497,441 times
Reputation: 207
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
With the exception of Louisiana, Catholicism dominates none of them. FL's Catholic population is not historical, it's northern transplants. When we moved there in the 60s, the WHOLE state was one diocese! And all the priests were Irish missionaries (except for the ones from Cuba)
I never said it dominates them. Arizona has a large Mexican-American community but it does not dominate the state.
 
Old 06-06-2007, 05:22 AM
 
Location: Kentucky
6,749 posts, read 19,953,132 times
Reputation: 2129
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
Any state that has Winn-Dixie grocery stores is truly Southern. Kentucky meets these requirements perfectly. Not a single Winn-Dixie in Missouri that I've found yet. Every southern state has a Winn-Dixie.
We had Winn-Dixies here for years and then they went Bankrupt and left. I loved Winn-Dixie
 
Old 06-06-2007, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,764 posts, read 16,876,079 times
Reputation: 9324
Default Virginia...north or south?

Greetings....

I just moved to Colorado after living in Virginia Beach for almost 16 years. In my experience the Hampton Roads area is a mix of both north and south, more closely resembling the north than the south. Whenever I travelled away from the Virginia cities, I experienced a greater sense of being in the south, especially along the US 58 corridor. While travelling through the Shenandoah Valley I felt like I was in heaven. It was neither north or south...just a fabulous unique world of it's own. Virginia is a great state wether it gets classified as a northern state or a southern state. In reality, those classifications are just man made judgements, always open to debate and differient opinions.

Many Blessings....Franco
 
Old 06-06-2007, 10:40 AM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,115,139 times
Reputation: 5742
I just got in on this lengthy discussion and have enjoyed reading it. The topic of which states can be considered Southern have always been a source of interest and facination to me. So much has been stated (most of it very informative), that there is really not much I can add to it, originally speaking. However, I would like to take quick swing at a few things...

FIRST of all, I agree with Louisville about the map on Wikipedia (which I modestly admit to also have had a hand in defining and creating LOL) being a very good one so far as deliniating the Southern states, and "degrees" of Southerness. That is, as a WHOLE, and not making intra-state regional distinctions:

Always/Almost Always considered Southern:
Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee, North and South Carolina

Usually considered Southern: Texas, Kentucky, Virginia, Florida.

Sometimes/Occasionally considered Southern by some sources: Oklahoma, West Virginia, Missouri, Maryland, and Delaware

(Personally, my OWN South is the one outlined as the "Historic South" on the Wikipedia page, but includes Kentucky).

Anyway, with that said, just a few more points as concerns my native state of Texas.

1. Texas is essentially a Southern state, some parts more to MUCH more so than others. East Texas is where the Deep South begins, while the trans-pecos El Paso area is more a part of the true desert Southwest.

2. The "Southwest" thing about Texas is confusing, I think. With again that exception of the El Paso area (and perhaps, anymore, deep South Texas which is turning into Northern Mexico) the term as applies to the state is considerably different, in terms of history, culture, and traditions, than the same label applied to New Mexico and Arizona. Texas is the "western South", while the latter two states are the "southern West." Folks in the Deep South, especially those who have never been to Texas, might not draw that distinction, but it is there. Even most of West Texas, settled primarily by anglo Southerners after the "War for Southern Independence" is generally 'Southern" in many important cultural ways (heavily Baptist, socially conservative, etc). For anyone interested, I once wrote a little piece on this general subject which can be found at: Texas and the Deep South - Randy Hill

3. While there are undeniably "Western" influences on Texas, the "West" is not a coherent cultural region per se, but rather, a group of them which can be distinguished from the "East" mostly in terms of post-bellum settlement. If one looks closely at those states of the so-called West, then there are vast differences...especially with Texas. Even the most identified icon of all associated with the state (cowboys) have Southern roots.

4. Linguistically speaking, a "Texas accent" is simply one sub-variety of what is known as Southern speech. Of course, there is no such thing as one single "Texas accent"...folks in East Texas, especially among older residents, tend to have that soft "drawl" associated with the Hollywood stereotype of a Southern accent. In West Texas, it is more akin to that of eastern Tennessee. Now, admittedly, with the influx of northern migrants, a true Texas/Southern accent is fading in certain big metropolitan areas, particularly the suburbs of the same. However, in "True Texas" the speech patterns, inflections, idiom, etc, are MUCH more akin to the states of the southeast than those north of Oklahoma City and west of the New Mexico border.

5. That is all for the moment! LOL
 
Old 06-06-2007, 09:15 PM
 
301 posts, read 1,266,653 times
Reputation: 174
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
I just got in on this lengthy discussion and have enjoyed reading it. The topic of which states can be considered Southern have always been a source of interest and facination to me. So much has been stated (most of it very informative), that there is really not much I can add to it, originally speaking. However, I would like to take quick swing at a few things...

FIRST of all, I agree with Louisville about the map on Wikipedia (which I modestly admit to also have had a hand in defining and creating LOL) being a very good one so far as deliniating the Southern states, and "degrees" of Southerness. That is, as a WHOLE, and not making intra-state regional distinctions:

Always/Almost Always considered Southern:
Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee, North and South Carolina

Usually considered Southern: Texas, Kentucky, Virginia, Florida.

Sometimes/Occasionally considered Southern by some sources: Oklahoma, West Virginia, Missouri, Maryland, and Delaware

(Personally, my OWN South is the one outlined as the "Historic South" on the Wikipedia page, but includes Kentucky).

Anyway, with that said, just a few more points as concerns my native state of Texas.

1. Texas is essentially a Southern state, some parts more to MUCH more so than others. East Texas is where the Deep South begins, while the trans-pecos El Paso area is more a part of the true desert Southwest.

2. The "Southwest" thing about Texas is confusing, I think. With again that exception of the El Paso area (and perhaps, anymore, deep South Texas which is turning into Northern Mexico) the term as applies to the state is considerably different, in terms of history, culture, and traditions, than the same label applied to New Mexico and Arizona. Texas is the "western South", while the latter two states are the "southern West." Folks in the Deep South, especially those who have never been to Texas, might not draw that distinction, but it is there. Even most of West Texas, settled primarily by anglo Southerners after the "War for Southern Independence" is generally 'Southern" in many important cultural ways (heavily Baptist, socially conservative, etc). For anyone interested, I once wrote a little piece on this general subject which can be found at: Texas and the Deep South - Randy Hill

3. While there are undeniably "Western" influences on Texas, the "West" is not a coherent cultural region per se, but rather, a group of them which can be distinguished from the "East" mostly in terms of post-bellum settlement. If one looks closely at those states of the so-called West, then there are vast differences...especially with Texas. Even the most identified icon of all associated with the state (cowboys) have Southern roots.

4. Linguistically speaking, a "Texas accent" is simply one sub-variety of what is known as Southern speech. Of course, there is no such thing as one single "Texas accent"...folks in East Texas, especially among older residents, tend to have that soft "drawl" associated with the Hollywood stereotype of a Southern accent. In West Texas, it is more akin to that of eastern Tennessee. Now, admittedly, with the influx of northern migrants, a true Texas/Southern accent is fading in certain big metropolitan areas, particularly the suburbs of the same. However, in "True Texas" the speech patterns, inflections, idiom, etc, are MUCH more akin to the states of the southeast than those north of Oklahoma City and west of the New Mexico border.

5. That is all for the moment! LOL
Glad to see you enter the debate Texreb.
 
Old 06-07-2007, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Kentucky
6,749 posts, read 19,953,132 times
Reputation: 2129
I read on one of these forums somewhere that Louisville is almost identical to Austin, TX and even has similar slogans.... is that true?
 
Old 06-07-2007, 03:08 PM
 
1,965 posts, read 5,788,160 times
Reputation: 1273
"Louisville is almost identical to Austin, TX"

Let me put it this way. I could live in Austin. I would never live in Louisville.
 
Old 06-07-2007, 04:20 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
142 posts, read 955,454 times
Reputation: 105
"We had Winn-Dixies here for years and then they went Bankrupt and left. I loved Winn-Dixie" - missymomof3

Winn-Dixie sucked...I was in one in Miami, Florida looking for pita bread and hummus...not one employee in the entire store....including the general manager... even knew what it was...mind blowing... I mean, I don't expect everyone to know that it is a spread made from garbanzo beans as it is not very common in the south, but in a supermarket, in Miami? Comon!
 
Old 06-07-2007, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,764 posts, read 16,876,079 times
Reputation: 9324
acs.1979

What good is a store if you can't even get hummus. It's a wonder they don't all go out of business. LOL

Franco
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