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Old 06-17-2007, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Kentucky
6,749 posts, read 19,955,891 times
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Here where I am you can get sweet tea in almost any restaurant, not just McDonald's. In fact, they JUST started offering it there. Apparently there are places in other parts of the country where it is rare in any restaurant, especially places not in the South.

 
Old 06-17-2007, 09:05 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,907,044 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plains10 View Post
I agree, the Mississippi Delta counties and the counties in Missouri south of Highway 60 should be grouped with the south. It is interesting that you brought up Rolla. Rolla is right near the Ozark National Forest and has more of what I would call "Ozark culture." However, when I have visited this area their were southern accents for sure. However, I often hear more people with southern accents in KC than STL.
Rolla does have a twang to their accents I will admit....look no further than Mel Carnahan. he had an accent. I met somebody from Rolla actually the other day....I dunno...Rolla does have Southern influences and I agree that you do meet folks with Southern speech patterns there. On the other hand, it's not the same Southern slur to me at least that you find in the Upper South...it's a slight twang, well...anyways...the woman I met sounded pretty Midwestern with a slight twang. In any case, to deny Rolla has southern influences (it supported the confederacy during the civil war) is to deny facts. On the other hand, Phelps County is named after a Rolla governor who was pro-Yankee. But yea...I agree...Rolla does have Ozark culture. Whether that is Southern or not is open to debate...it does have some commonalities to the South, that's for sure, but it also is a culture of its own. in any case, I agree Plains10. Rolla does have Southern characteristics. In any case, i think it's not as southern as Louisville. I would agree that Rolla could be far south enough in Missouri that there could be room for a little Southern overlap.

Last edited by ajf131; 06-17-2007 at 09:41 PM..
 
Old 06-17-2007, 09:47 PM
 
Location: Nashville
81 posts, read 296,956 times
Reputation: 51
^^I drove thru Rolla on my way to the very beautiful state of New Mexico, and stopped at the local McDonalds to get lunch. While there some of the locals smiled and greeted me as if I was a local who lived there my entire life. I did detect a "twaing" in the accent but nothing as pronounced as, say, in the South. As far as being Southern is concerned there's no question Rolla has Southern influences being in the extreme northern end of the transition zone of course, but it is still nowhere near what I would consider Dixie. Now, by the time you get to Branson, Cape Girardeau, Sikeston, all that **** down there, then you're in Dixie.
 
Old 06-17-2007, 10:38 PM
 
Location: Richmond
1,489 posts, read 8,125,132 times
Reputation: 698
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
FINALLY somebody with common sense Don't get me wrong, I've got nothing against the south, I'm actually considering moving to North Carolina when I finally retire, but Missouri is not the Upper South, not by a long shot, ESPECIALLY the northern half of Missouri. Southern Missouri may have some Southern characteristics but unless you are in the Mississippi Delta counties of southeast Missouri (around Cape Girardeau), it is not Dixie by a long shot. You'd be surprised how much more southern Louisville is than places in Missouri that are further south, like Rolla, for example. Even Carbondale, Illinois, which is practically at the latitude of Richmond, Virginia, is not as southern as Louisville. How is this possible, you might ask? Quite simple...THE OHIO RIVER a.k.a. Mason-Dixon line separating the Midwest and the South. It's quite an accurate divider these days. As an avid traveler, I've crossed it many times so I would know, including the areas where it becomes the 36 degree latitude line in Missouri.
Thats true. But tell some Kentuckians I know who think they are South of Virginia to look at a map and explain how they are south of Virginia.

Kentucky ain't South of Virginny. Its west.


Richmond is actually south of Louisville, but some people think east means north.

Its so funny because this guy in Nashville actually asked me how things were up north (I was coming to play his venue in Nashville). He's actually a yankee not native to Nashville. I'm more southern than he is on any day.

If you drew a line from Richmond Virginia straight across to Kentucky you would be no more than 2 hours north of Nashville. Richmond is actually parellell to Elizabethtown, KY.

Its a 10 hour drive from Richmond to Nashville only because you have go far and west.
 
Old 06-17-2007, 10:40 PM
 
Location: Texas!
332 posts, read 359,556 times
Reputation: 108
I consider the South:

Alabama,Louisana,Atlanta,northern Florida,Mississippi,Tennesse,and the majority of Texas.
 
Old 06-17-2007, 10:49 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,907,044 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by vasinger View Post
Thats true. But tell some Kentuckians I know who think they are South of Virginia to look at a map and explain how they are south of Virginia.

Kentucky ain't South of Virginny. Its west.


Richmond is actually south of Louisville, but some people think east means north.

Its so funny because this guy in Nashville actually asked me how things were up north (I was coming to play his venue in Nashville). He's actually a yankee not native to Nashville. I'm more southern than he is on any day.

If you drew a line from Richmond Virginia straight across to Kentucky you would be no more than 2 hours north of Nashville. Richmond is actually parellell to Elizabethtown, KY.

Its a 10 hour drive from Richmond to Nashville only because you have go far and west.

Did I ever say Kentucky was south of Virginia? I said Richmond was south of louisville. What are you trying to prove to me that I don't already know?
 
Old 06-18-2007, 01:00 PM
 
301 posts, read 1,266,774 times
Reputation: 174
Quote:
Originally Posted by vasinger View Post
Thats true. But tell some Kentuckians I know who think they are South of Virginia to look at a map and explain how they are south of Virginia.

Kentucky ain't South of Virginny. Its west.


The bottom that Kentucky and Virginia share actually slants Upwards when you get to Virginia, not to mention the purchase of Kentucky dips more into the South than anywhere in Virginia.
 
Old 06-18-2007, 02:52 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,907,044 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by DefaultAlias View Post
^^I drove thru Rolla on my way to the very beautiful state of New Mexico, and stopped at the local McDonalds to get lunch. While there some of the locals smiled and greeted me as if I was a local who lived there my entire life. I did detect a "twaing" in the accent but nothing as pronounced as, say, in the South. As far as being Southern is concerned there's no question Rolla has Southern influences being in the extreme northern end of the transition zone of course, but it is still nowhere near what I would consider Dixie. Now, by the time you get to Branson, Cape Girardeau, Sikeston, all that **** down there, then you're in Dixie.
I couldn't agree more Default.
 
Old 06-18-2007, 09:22 PM
 
Location: Richmond
1,489 posts, read 8,125,132 times
Reputation: 698
Quote:
Originally Posted by Louisvilleslugger View Post


The bottom that Kentucky and Virginia share actually slants Upwards when you get to Virginia, not to mention the purchase of Kentucky dips more into the South than anywhere in Virginia.
That little tiny part of Kentucky dips slightly south of Virginia.

But the rest slants at the same point.

But Im in Richmond , and I'm south of Louisville.
 
Old 06-18-2007, 11:23 PM
 
301 posts, read 1,266,774 times
Reputation: 174
Quote:
Originally Posted by vasinger View Post
That little tiny part of Kentucky dips slightly south of Virginia.

But the rest slants at the same point.

But Im in Richmond , and I'm south of Louisville.
No if you look at the map the bottom border that Kentucky and Virginia share slants downward as you make your way east ward to Kentucky. The purchase only pushes it further South.

Yeah Richmond slightly South of Louisville.
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