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Old 06-25-2007, 09:12 PM
 
Location: Richmond
1,489 posts, read 8,125,712 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miamiman View Post
If you want to get technical about it, there are some parts of southern Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois that are lower latitude than the northermost town in Virginia, Cross Junction. The northernmost point of VA extends slightly north of the northernmost point in KY. Again, I think other factors should be considered other than latitude when determining what is southern and what isn't. I believe that in Kentucky you're immersed in "southern culture" much more rapidly than you are in Virginia. Many people, as far down as Virginia Beach, have absolutely no southern accent; at the sane latitude in KY, you would be hard-pressed to find any natives without extremely strong accents.
Sorry I disagree.

Have been to Kentucky. I feel Virginia is a little more Southern. Kentucky wasn't even in the Confederacy. Va Beach is transient like Northern Virginia. You won't find southern accents there. Its a resort area. And come summer, they get lots of yanks who come down from New Jersey and New York, not to mention military people all over Hampton Roads.



Go to Richmond, Charlottesville, Fredericksburg, Roanoake, or The Shenandoah Valley and you won't forget you're in the South.

 
Old 06-25-2007, 09:16 PM
 
Location: Richmond
1,489 posts, read 8,125,712 times
Reputation: 698
Quote:
Originally Posted by dvmre View Post
From TX, but lived in VA for 4 years. Virginia is Southern. They celebrate Robert E. Lee Day, fly the confederate flag, and have civil war reenactments. They serve sweet tea. Their accents are clearly southern. Sorry TX chick, you are wrong about VA. They may be geographically mid-atlantic. But culturally, very southern. Less so compared to GA, MS, SC, and NC, but def. southern.
I've heard people on the weather Channel even refer to North Carolina as Mid-Atlantic. I don't think thats accurate.

I think the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast kind of overlap each other. Northern Virginia may be Mid-Atlantic, but when you get to Richmond you're definitely in the Southeast. No matter what they say on the Weather Channel. I mean the climate alone is sub tropical.

 
Old 06-25-2007, 09:58 PM
 
Location: 602/520
2,441 posts, read 6,124,116 times
Reputation: 1815
Quote:
Originally Posted by vasinger View Post
Sorry I disagree.

Have been to Kentucky. I feel Virginia is a little more Southern. Kentucky wasn't even in the Confederacy. Va Beach is transient like Northern Virginia. You won't find southern accents there. Its a resort area. And come summer, they get lots of yanks who come down from New Jersey and New York, not to mention military people all over Hampton Roads.



Go to Richmond, Charlottesville, Fredericksburg, Roanoake, or The Shenandoah Valley and you won't forget you're in the South.
Kentucky may not have the same history as Virginia when it comes to the Civil War, but culturally Kentucky is more Southern. Throughout nearly the entire state of Kentucky you will hear southern accents. You would be hard pressed to find a restaurant in Kentucky that doesn't serve sweet tea. Kentucky hasn't been "invaded" with nearly the outside influence that Virginia has, and the culture certainly reflects that.

In some restaurants in Northern Virginia you will get stared at like an alien if you ask for sweet tea, grits, or many other foods that are southern staples. Hearing southern accents in Northern Virginia is extremely rare, despite the fact that many of the street names are named after Confederate soldiers. There is an extreme cut-off between South and North in Virginia, and I believe that northern culture is quickly sweeping down that state. Kentucky, on the other hand, has retained its southern roots and heritage.

Richmond, while more southern than a city like Atlanta, is still "southern lite" when compared to the rest of the South. Accents in Richmond are barely noticable on most people anymore; many younger residents cringe at the thought of considering themselves southerners. The one area of Virginia that I still give credit of truly retaining its southern roots is southwestern and extreme southern Virginia. The area from Emporia, Roanoke, Danville, Bristol, and Wise is undoubtedly Southern. Some of the strongest most stereotypical Southern accents in Virginia are heard near the borders with Tennessee, southern West Virginia, and oddly enough, Kentucky.
 
Old 06-25-2007, 11:46 PM
 
Location: Richmond
1,489 posts, read 8,125,712 times
Reputation: 698
Quote:
Originally Posted by miamiman View Post
Kentucky may not have the same history as Virginia when it comes to the Civil War, but culturally Kentucky is more Southern. Throughout nearly the entire state of Kentucky you will hear southern accents. You would be hard pressed to find a restaurant in Kentucky that doesn't serve sweet tea. Kentucky hasn't been "invaded" with nearly the outside influence that Virginia has, and the culture certainly reflects that.

In some restaurants in Northern Virginia you will get stared at like an alien if you ask for sweet tea, grits, or many other foods that are southern staples. Hearing southern accents in Northern Virginia is extremely rare, despite the fact that many of the street names are named after Confederate soldiers. There is an extreme cut-off between South and North in Virginia, and I believe that northern culture is quickly sweeping down that state. Kentucky, on the other hand, has retained its southern roots and heritage.

Richmond, while more southern than a city like Atlanta, is still "southern lite" when compared to the rest of the South. Accents in Richmond are barely noticable on most people anymore; many younger residents cringe at the thought of considering themselves southerners. The one area of Virginia that I still give credit of truly retaining its southern roots is southwestern and extreme southern Virginia. The area from Emporia, Roanoke, Danville, Bristol, and Wise is undoubtedly Southern. Some of the strongest most stereotypical Southern accents in Virginia are heard near the borders with Tennessee, southern West Virginia, and oddly enough, Kentucky.

Thats simply because of location. Kentucky has less transplants, and less industry from outside. But to me is not quite like the Old South as is Virginia.

The accents are mountain and twangy, not drawls like Virginia.

But I think most Southerners today are losing their distinctive regional accents.

I have been to Deep South and even there the younger generation sounds less and less Southern than they did before.

Richmond Southern Lite?

Hardly. The New York times even did an article about how Richmond is southern to the core in every regard from cuisine, to architecture and culture.

Old Richmonders pride themselves on their gracious manners and fine living.

There's magnolias and dogwoods on every corner.

Virginia is changeing and is not as Southern as it has been , but Virginia's history and culture quite frankly surpasses Kentucky in all respects.

And I would disagree with your assesment of Southest VA. Southwest Virginia is more mountain, and I don't consider representative of true Virginia culture. The real Southern areas of Virginia are Richmond and Charlottesville and Danville around South Boston. And also the Shenandoah Valley

And yes, even in Northern Virginia today you can get BBQ, grits, sweet tea, and spoonbread and other southern favorites.
 
Old 06-26-2007, 05:56 AM
 
Location: Kentucky
6,749 posts, read 19,957,210 times
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I went to Nashville last month and took my son to Dukes fest. When we went to park, there was a family selling spaces, parents and teen. The parents had an accent, the teen did not. How is that?
 
Old 06-26-2007, 12:53 PM
 
Location: Richmond
1,489 posts, read 8,125,712 times
Reputation: 698
Quote:
Originally Posted by missymomof3 View Post
I went to Nashville last month and took my son to Dukes fest. When we went to park, there was a family selling spaces, parents and teen. The parents had an accent, the teen did not. How is that?
Its sad but true. I thought it was just here in Virginia, but it seems all across the South the local accents are dissapearing. It seems each generation is more and more homogonized.

While we learn our accents from our parents, we also speak like those we most associate with. We also learn our acccents from our peers and teachers. And if more people around us speak non Southern, then we will begin to develop northern accents as well.

I have met people from Georgia who barely have a trace of Southern accent.

I actually have more myself because I spent most of my time with my older relatives from Tidewater Virginia.

I think TV and also influx from northern states has a lot to do with it.

Also people's ignorance about the southern accents in general. They think it means hillbilly or uneducated. They think speaking southern is the same as improper grammar. And of course, improper grammar is improper, whether its Bostonian , Californian, or East Tennessee.

I have a friend who went to school in Fairfax where they actually had a course to remove southern accents.

If anyone can remember the days when Northern Virginia was still southern.
 
Old 06-26-2007, 02:50 PM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,121,427 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vasinger View Post
Its sad but true. I thought it was just here in Virginia, but it seems all across the South the local accents are dissapearing. It seems each generation is more and more homogonized.

While we learn our accents from our parents, we also speak like those we most associate with. We also learn our acccents from our peers and teachers. And if more people around us speak non Southern, then we will begin to develop northern accents as well.

I have met people from Georgia who barely have a trace of Southern accent.

I actually have more myself because I spent most of my time with my older relatives from Tidewater Virginia.

I think TV and also influx from northern states has a lot to do with it.

Also people's ignorance about the southern accents in general. They think it means hillbilly or uneducated. They think speaking southern is the same as improper grammar. And of course, improper grammar is improper, whether its Bostonian , Californian, or East Tennessee.

I have a friend who went to school in Fairfax where they actually had a course to remove southern accents.

If anyone can remember the days when Northern Virginia was still southern.

I, sadly, agree with all said on this subject. A true Southern accent (whether it be the soft drawls of the southeast coast, the "moonlight and magolias" of the Deep South, or the twangs of the upper South and west Texas) IS disappearing among younger Southerners.

As was said, our modern mobile society and the influx of transplanted yankees has a lot to do with it, especially in the larger metropolitan areas like Atlanta, and urban cities of Texas, most of Florida, and northern Virginia, to name a few.

As was also stated, when kids spend most of their time watching TV, that is bound to affect, over time, as well.

A both funny and revealing story I just have to share about all of this, starts When, a few years ago, attending a convention, I checked into a motel room near the Dallas-Ft.Worth International Airport. The clerk was a very nice black lady, and we exchanged small talk as she was taking my information. Even before I presented my DL, she said to me "you must be from Texas!."

I was both amused and taken aback. After all, weren't we STILL in Texas?? Anyway, I asked, grinning, what clued her in. She replied, "cos honey, you don't sound like you are from around here!"

I had to laugh ... but feel a little sadly lamenting, too...
 
Old 06-26-2007, 06:07 PM
 
Location: NJ
12,284 posts, read 31,777,286 times
Reputation: 5220
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
The clerk was a very nice black lady, and we exchanged small talk as she was taking my information.
not to be a bit*h or anything, but what does the fact that she was black have to do with your story?

kinda reminds me of the commercial back in the early 70's with the kid and his grandfather on the fishing boat. who remembers it?
 
Old 06-26-2007, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Richmond
1,489 posts, read 8,125,712 times
Reputation: 698
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
I, sadly, agree with all said on this subject. A true Southern accent (whether it be the soft drawls of the southeast coast, the "moonlight and magolias" of the Deep South, or the twangs of the upper South and west Texas) IS disappearing among younger Southerners.

As was said, our modern mobile society and the influx of transplanted yankees has a lot to do with it, especially in the larger metropolitan areas like Atlanta, and urban cities of Texas, most of Florida, and northern Virginia, to name a few.

As was also stated, when kids spend most of their time watching TV, that is bound to affect, over time, as well.

A both funny and revealing story I just have to share about all of this, starts When, a few years ago, attending a convention, I checked into a motel room near the Dallas-Ft.Worth International Airport. The clerk was a very nice black lady, and we exchanged small talk as she was taking my information. Even before I presented my DL, she said to me "you must be from Texas!."

I was both amused and taken aback. After all, weren't we STILL in Texas?? Anyway, I asked, grinning, what clued her in. She replied, "cos honey, you don't sound like you are from around here!"

I had to laugh ... but feel a little sadly lamenting, too...
I've had it stranger than that.

Some people have thought I wasn't from Virginia in my native state . When I told them I was a native of Virginia, they said " oh it sounds much further south". When ironically, its probably the closest thing you'd hear to a real Virginia accent. And I never was aware of this. But I also was home schooled so I didnt spend a lot of time with my peers my age or watch a whole lot of tv. I hung around older people. My grandmother lived with me and she had a very deep Richmond accent that is rare to hear these days.

But most of these people I encounter are not from Virginia originally, or only used to the much lighter version of Virginia that you hear from our local tv announcers I suppose.

My accent is weird though because I grew up in northern virginia but my father is from kentucky and my mother is from Richmond and I spent my early summers with my older relatives from Tidewater and Richmond. I also had a lot of friends from the Shenandoah Valley so that rubbed off on me. I'm a walking hybrid of stuff.
 
Old 06-26-2007, 08:35 PM
 
Location: Kentucky
6,749 posts, read 19,957,210 times
Reputation: 2129
My husband is Irish. Off the boat Irish. When we first met, his accent was so appealing and I was hooked. We were married three years later :-). However, I don't hear his accent much anymore unless he says certain words. Has he lost it? No, I am just used to it. Could it be that we are used to the way people around us talk?
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