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Old 04-25-2007, 05:57 PM
 
151 posts, read 659,400 times
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Heres a map of what I call South.

There are people in the Southern halves of Northern States that tend to act little more Southern. I call them "States with Little Dixies".

 
Old 04-25-2007, 06:01 PM
 
Location: North Dakota Farm
322 posts, read 1,135,350 times
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Anything BELOW the Mason Dixon line
 
Old 04-25-2007, 06:51 PM
 
Location: In God
3,073 posts, read 10,771,034 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TerrySRA View Post
Heres a map of what I call South.

There are people in the Southern halves of Northern States that tend to act little more Southern. I call them "States with Little Dixies".
But see, that's how people mess up. Southern does not necessarily mean country. That's kind of stereotypical. There are farms, countrysides, and conservative lifestyles in probably every state in this country.

Again, southern and country are not the same thing.
 
Old 04-25-2007, 07:22 PM
 
Location: North Dakota Farm
322 posts, read 1,135,350 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TerrySRA View Post
Heres a map of what I call South.

There are people in the Southern halves of Northern States that tend to act little more Southern. I call them "States with Little Dixies".
I am curious as to how South Dakota got onto this map as 'deep south'? Or am I just completely ignorant to this map?
 
Old 04-25-2007, 07:59 PM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,057,064 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
The Mason-Dixon line does not extend due west from the Maryland-Pennsylvania border!!! It starts there and then becomes the Ohio River basically and then where the Ohio meets the Mississippi the line extends due west across the 36 degree latitude line established by the Missouri Compromise. That is the modern (modern being early 1800's LOL) definition of the Mason-Dixon line. Using the Mason Dixon line this way, all of the cities you just mentioned except for San Diego and Phoenix are far north of Dixie. Baltimore and Wilmington and Washington are obviously not purely Southern because they are ON the Mason-Dixon practically and I've been there and I'll be damned if Dixie is in Maryland or Delaware or D.C. And frankly the modern definition of the Mason-Dixon line is a much better way to define Dixie then the way you just mentioned. However it's not the best way because you don't simply leave the pure North and enter the pure South upon the crossing of a simple line, speaking in terms other than geographical ones. But it pretty much accurately measures where the two cultures meet each other.
I know, afj131. Just having some fun.
 
Old 04-25-2007, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Southern California
3,455 posts, read 7,304,853 times
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hahaha. I love that you threw in south dakota. nice touch.

I pretty much agree with your map, and definitley the little dixie areas...except pennsylvania and new jersey surprise me -- but I have never spent much time in the eastern part of the country (I almost said east coast, but that might get me in trouble too!).

Oh....and Texas is not deep south to me. Deep south to me is Alabama, Mississippi (those are the two that come to mind right away!) then lousiana and georgia. I dont consider the carolinas deep south either.

nice map though!
 
Old 04-25-2007, 08:31 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,909,420 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by TerrySRA View Post
Heres a map of what I call South.

There are people in the Southern halves of Northern States that tend to act little more Southern. I call them "States with Little Dixies".
This map is one of the dumbest and most grossly inaccurate I have ever seen at least as far as defining the culture of any state that touches the Mason-Dixon line. I agree with Maryland and West Virginia but not with Kentucky and Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio. Missouri these days is every bit as Midwestern as Kansas, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio. The Southern portions of these dates are not Dixie that is laughable they are too Midwestern. Again, the Mason-Dixon line as the literal divide between North and South is for those who basically don't want to accept there is a border region in the United States. The areas around the Mason-Dixon are culturally mixed with the exception of Cincinnati, Baltimore, and D.C. which I would say qualify as Northern. Cincinnati is Midwesetern. All areas except the ones I just mentioned around the Mason-Dixon have blended cultures. I have been to Louisville and Lexington many times, and each time I go there I get the same impression....they are mixed in culture, dialect, everything. They are far closer to Ohio and Indiana than they are to Tennessee or Virginia. Kentucky is never predominantly Midwestern, but I would not go so far as to say it really is predominantly Southern until you are south of the Louisville and Lexington metro areas. I have always thought of Kentucky as being more like West Virginia than any Southern state...it touches many Northern and Southern states so I think that it cannot definitely be classified as uniformly the same in culture everywhere you go throughout the state. Southern Indiana, Southern Illinois, and Southern Ohio (excluding Cincinnati, which I consider purely Midwestern) and Southern Missouri with the exception of extreme Southeastern Missouri and the bootheel all seem culturally mixed. Maryland and West Virginia are definitely culturally ambiguous. Virginia with the exception of the suburbs of D.C. is predominately Southern. I could never call any state that seceded during the Civil War except maybe Texas due to the fact it's so huge anything other than Southern. The MAson-Dixon line does not literally divide the North and South....it is an approximation of where the cultures meet. I am one of the people who is willing to acknowledge there are border regions in the U.S. Missouri for the most part is predominantly Midwestern. Sorry mpope409. Did not mean to quote you.

Last edited by ajf131; 04-25-2007 at 08:53 PM..
 
Old 04-25-2007, 08:36 PM
 
90 posts, read 243,679 times
Reputation: 53
Maryland is a "wanna be" state......the north wants it to be considered south and the south wants it be considered north.
 
Old 04-25-2007, 08:43 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,909,420 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
Missouri never officially joined the Confederacy...

They were thinking about it, but somehow the Union (or enough pro-union citizens) got control of its state government before could get around to seceding. However, one of the stars on the Confederate Battle Flag represents Missouri, since many Missourians fought for the Confederacy anyways. It was probably like Kenutcky, a mish-mash of pro-Confederate and pro-union citizens instead of a relatively homogenous area of public opinion.
Missouri had a pro-Southern governor determined to take Missouri out of the Union no matter if the citizens overwhelmingly opposed secession or not. When he was elected he made it look like he was neutral in stance It's citizens were not pro-Southern. Over 100,000 men fought for the Union, 50,000 for the Confederacy. Antebellum Missouri and post-Civil War Missouri are very different from one another. Missouri voted for Douglas, a moderate pro-Unionist from Springfield, Illinois during Lincoln's election....NO SOUTHERN STATE VOTED FOR DOUGLAS. Give it a rest. Also, as far as I'm concerned...if an area does not meet the classification of Southern and is geographically far enough North (regardless of the Mason-Dixon)...it's not Southern. The Mason-Dixon line does not tell the entire cultural truth about areas lying immediately south of it.
 
Old 04-25-2007, 08:48 PM
 
3,042 posts, read 8,092,047 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mpope409 View Post
But see, that's how people mess up. Southern does not necessarily mean country. That's kind of stereotypical. There are farms, countrysides, and conservative lifestyles in probably every state in this country.

Again, southern and country are not the same thing.

Thank you, you would think with all the public education people love to love in this country people would know demographics and geography by now. the south is not any more rural in Georgia, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, Texas, than New York, Pennsylvania, Vermont, NH, Minnesota, Maine, Mass.

Mass has boston only-Alabama has Montogomery and Birmingham
Vermont has Burlington only-Miss has jackson(same size)
NH has portsmouth and Nashua--same as Memphis and Nashville Tenn
New york has NYC, Albany, Buffalo as big cities and rochester but they are no comparison to Houston, Dallas, Austin, San Antonio, Lubbuck and Elpaso

Pennsylvania has pittsburgh and philly but NC has charlotte, raliegh durham
and virginia has Va beach, Richmond, alexandria arlington
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