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Old 05-20-2009, 11:23 PM
 
Location: Near Devil's Pond, Georgia
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When I lived in Central Florida there were a few local phrases specific to the state. Since Florida had coastline on the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean locals would make a distinction between the two coast by using Atlantic Coast or East Coast for the one and Gulf Coast or WEST Coast for the other. Seriously, you would hear some say West Coast for the Gulf Coast areas. Obviously this could lead to confusion when using the term "West Coast" for the situation unique to Florida when most folks would probably think it was a moniker reserved for the Pacific Coast contiguous states. To avoid confusion one would sometimes hear the term "Left Coast" used for California, Oregon, and Washington.
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Old 05-20-2009, 11:31 PM
 
Location: New England & The Maritimes
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coolhand68 View Post
To me, if I-95 cuts through it, then it's the east coast. That's Maine to Florida and all states in between, if I-95 doesn't touch it then it's not east coast.
Vermont?
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Old 05-20-2009, 11:49 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marya View Post
It seems to. Especially since I've seen states that don't border the ocean at all, like Pennsylvania and Vermont, included in the "East Coast." And I also hear people from Atlantic-bordering Southern states use the terms synonymously.

How do you define the "East Coast"?
It doesn't equate but then again, the Harvard educated President said there were 57 states and someone I know asked me to stop by NY and visit her on my way from MD to TN. I'm thinking geography is not an American strength.
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Old 05-21-2009, 12:18 PM
 
Location: IN
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I think a good delineation is the I-95 corridor. The areas along and southeast of the corridor generally have a faster pace of life, a higher population density, a higher job growth rate, and a higher educational achievement rate. Once you travel north away from the I-95 megaopolis corridor you experience a gradual shift toward more Appalachian influences and less "East Coast" influences. The pace of life away from the coast is less hurried, the population density is far less, the forests are much thicker with mountains, and the population is somewhat less educated.
I live in the Appalachians north of the East Coast corridor and wouldn't have it any other way. I get the best of both worlds. I don't particularly care for the Boston suburbia area of NH, but it is nice to be within a 45 minute drive of the Manchester airport. I also like the fact that Merrimack County has a micropolitan city (Concord) that has most of the services, entertainment, and goods that I need. The population density of the county is 150 people per square mile which is just about right in my book. (Neither too urbanized nor extraordinarily rural).
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Old 05-21-2009, 12:27 PM
 
Location: 3219'03.7"N 10643'55.9"W
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This was my stab at it, nationally, anyway, a couple of years ago:

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Old 05-21-2009, 12:32 PM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike0421 View Post
This was my stab at it, nationally, anyway, a couple of years ago:
That is a fairly good map. However, I would not consider any part of Arkansas, Oklahoma, or Texas to be in the Midwest region. I am a little confused by what region is delineates Florida
Also, I would eliminate the Mid Atlantic in central and northern NY. The Adriondacks are a large wilderness area that is a crossover between New England and Canada in terms of forest types. The Adirondacks are also part of the Canadian Shield geologically, and have nothing in common with the Appalachian mountains in the southern tier counties of NY nor the mountains of northern New England.
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Old 05-21-2009, 12:38 PM
 
Location: 3219'03.7"N 10643'55.9"W
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
That is a fairly good map. However, I would not consider any part of Arkansas, Oklahoma, or Texas to be in the Midwest region. I am a little confused by what region is delineates Florida
Also, I would eliminate the Mid Atlantic in central and northern NY. The Adriondacks are a large wilderness area that is a crossover between New England and Canada in terms of forest types. The Adirondacks are also part of the Canadian Shield geologically, and have nothing in common with the Appalachian mountains in the southern tier counties of NY nor the mountains of northern New England.
The Adirondacks, along with the southern region of Texas, were the two most difficult regions to classify, when I made this map. I almost felt like creating two separate micro-regions for them.
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Old 05-21-2009, 01:46 PM
 
4,247 posts, read 9,713,753 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike0421 View Post
The Adirondacks, along with the southern region of Texas, were the two most difficult regions to classify, when I made this map. I almost felt like creating two separate micro-regions for them.
Interesting. I think I would have New England wrap up a little more into Northern NYS rather than extending the "Mid-Atlantic" to the St. Lawrence though. That would make New England border Appalachia, and in truth there is some degree of cultural gradation. The rural sections of northern third of PA, like most of upstate NY west of about ten miles west of the Hudson, and honestly northeast and north-central Ohio, really were settled as an outgrowth of New England, and the old house and barn forms resemble New England more than they do southern PA. Yet rural poverty has spread up the hinterland highland chain at least through the Mohawk Valley. So it's a toss-up as to whether to draw a line roughly paralleling I-80 15 miles to the north (or about where the coal outcrop runs out), and to call the section of Appalachia without coal "New England" due to the familial heritage, and to make that area honorary "swamp Yankees".

I'd also move the Great Valley from Appalachia to Mid-Atlantic, from Harrisburg to at least as far south as Front Royal, or perhaps as far south as Staunton. Areas where the south German-Swiss strain predominates seem more a Mid-Atlantic than Appalachian trait to me.
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Old 05-21-2009, 01:57 PM
 
Location: where my heart is
5,642 posts, read 7,968,487 times
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Default Left Coast

Quote:
Originally Posted by buckhead View Post
When I lived in Central Florida there were a few local phrases specific to the state. Since Florida had coastline on the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean locals would make a distinction between the two coast by using Atlantic Coast or East Coast for the one and Gulf Coast or WEST Coast for the other. Seriously, you would hear some say West Coast for the Gulf Coast areas. Obviously this could lead to confusion when using the term "West Coast" for the situation unique to Florida when most folks would probably think it was a moniker reserved for the Pacific Coast contiguous states. To avoid confusion one would sometimes hear the term "Left Coast" used for California, Oregon, and Washington.
has come to mean political leanings.
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Old 05-22-2009, 01:44 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TANaples View Post
has come to mean political leanings.
Both coast are left coasts (if you follow the restriction of 'east coast' to the Northeast, that is).


ABQConvict
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