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Old 01-31-2008, 11:45 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,814 posts, read 12,316,247 times
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My definition is from Northern Virginia and Washington, D.C. all the way up to Maine. I exclude West Virginia and western Pennsylvania. North Carolina is a southern state, as is most of Virginia.

"Eastern Seaboard" might include everything down to Florida though.
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Old 02-01-2008, 12:01 AM
 
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The term East Coast is not meant as a geographic title or, yes, anywhere from Miami to Maine would be included. It really means anywhere from D.C. to NE, mainly Boston. More particularly, though, to most people, I think its East of the Alleghenies and north of the Mason-Dixon line, which really does separate North from South and runs along the southern border of PA. "East Coast" is a colloquialism, and is synonymous with the more dated term: "Back East." Of course, along with it always meant the implications of wealth, style and Ivy League sophistication.

The southern Eastern seaboard simply isn’t sophisticated enough to be considered “East Coast” though physically, it meets the definition.
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Old 02-01-2008, 02:28 AM
 
Location: Henderson NV
1,134 posts, read 913,255 times
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I never associate the east coast with wealth, style and Ivy League sophistication. I always think "..crumbling red brick, dirty gutters, bitter weather and depressed people with bags under their eyes!" What's with the 'bags'?
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Old 02-01-2008, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
2,237 posts, read 6,564,464 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by milquetoast View Post
I never associate the east coast with wealth, style and Ivy League sophistication. I always think "..crumbling red brick, dirty gutters, bitter weather and depressed people with bags under their eyes!" What's with the 'bags'?
Ya, I'm not sure I would equate most of Baltimore, Philly, and Brooklyn with wealth, style and Ivy League sophistication (although I love all three areas).
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Old 02-01-2008, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia,New Jersey, NYC!
6,967 posts, read 18,203,309 times
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you west coasters crack me up
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Old 02-01-2008, 10:54 AM
 
5,857 posts, read 14,041,383 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
I would suspect that you don't hear about the "WEstern Seaboard" because the cities on the West Coast are a very good distance apart from each other with the exception of San Diego and Los Angeles. San Francisco is about 6 hours from Los Angeles, Portland is very far away from San Francisco, and Seattle is a good distance away from Portland. With the east coast, you essentially have major cities that are continuously lined up with each other every 100 miles, and once you get into the Northeast, it becomes that or possibly less. D.C. and Baltimore are practically the same city, Baltimore is very close to Wilmington, Wilmington is very close to Philadelphia, Philadelphia is very close to New York, New York is pretty close to Hartford, Hartford is very close to Providence, Providence is very close to Boston, etc. You essentially have a whole bunch of major cities lining the east coast.
Not sure I follow you. Are you saying that the term "seabord" is defined by closely spaced cities?
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Old 02-01-2008, 10:57 AM
 
5,857 posts, read 14,041,383 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terrapin2212 View Post
My definition is from Northern Virginia and Washington, D.C. all the way up to Maine. I exclude West Virginia and western Pennsylvania. North Carolina is a southern state, as is most of Virginia.

"Eastern Seaboard" might include everything down to Florida though.
Is Jamestown, NY an East Coast city, then? Why/why not?
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Old 02-01-2008, 11:43 AM
 
2,770 posts, read 5,355,507 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by milquetoast View Post
I never associate the east coast with wealth, style and Ivy League sophistication. I always think "..crumbling red brick, dirty gutters, bitter weather and depressed people with bags under their eyes!" What's with the 'bags'?
How convenient to dismiss the following:

Princeton (NJ)
Harvard (MA)
Yale (CT)
Cornell (NY)...just to name a 'few'

I suppose everyone in the west is 'happy' and depression is a none-issue. I suppose there are no slums and perhaps 'clean' gutters, etc. And I'm sure everyone loves hot weather in the winter (for sure) and boiling weather in the summer (not so sure)

I'm certain if everything were indeed as peachy on your end then NV wouldn't be rated one of the highest crime states. Only to be followed by NM and Arizona.

Most Dangerous States, 2007 — Infoplease.com

The NE, by whatever definition it is listed, is fast-paced for sure, but that can be seen as a trait to be enjoyed by some but not liked by all.
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Old 02-01-2008, 11:47 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,899,356 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Not sure I follow you. Are you saying that the term "seabord" is defined by closely spaced cities?
Yes, that's one thing I'm trying to say. I'm also saying that when you line up all the cities on the East Coast, it looks like essentially a seaboard, you have these huge amounts of closely spaced dots to each other next to each city. In the West Coast you don't have a lot of dots to connect so to speak. I dunno...it's just one theory.
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Old 02-01-2008, 12:43 PM
 
5,102 posts, read 5,977,342 times
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Some of this just amazes me. ALL of PA is Northeastern.

As for the semantics of East Coast. Well the East is not like the West.

Once you leave the west coast cities, there's not much, but the Eastern U.S. is different. East Coast doesn't work as term like that.

Not to mention the Northeast (Pgh, DC on up) is not the same as Southeast.

The West coast is considered the same region.
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