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Old 04-25-2007, 08:08 AM
 
Location: Hell
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Old 04-25-2007, 09:22 AM
 
Location: In God
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
Maybe it depends on the species of palms. In South Carolina they seem to be able to blend their palms into their tall pine/oak background easily and nicely. But at the same time there are less palm trees to choose from there since their winters get colder than around Houston.

In SC, you see cabbage palmettos (state tree), pindo palm (small date-like palm), sago palm (very small cycad) and banana plants mostly. Sometimes you see tiny windmill palms, needle palms and chinese fan palms.

I suppose a giant, regal-looking Canary Island date palm would look strange next to a live oak with moss. I don't think they can grow in SC but I've seen pics of them even in San Antonio. In the East, you usually don't see that palm until you hit Florida.
Yeah you'll find types of palms pretty much all throughout the south, or atleast the cities near by the coast. You'll see them in Georgia too, along the Savannah River. But of course in Georgia you have pine woods sooooo tall and thick you hardly even notice.
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Old 04-25-2007, 10:55 AM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
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Originally Posted by mpope409 View Post
Yeah you'll find types of palms pretty much all throughout the south, or atleast the cities near by the coast. You'll see them in Georgia too, along the Savannah River. But of course in Georgia you have pine woods sooooo tall and thick you hardly even notice.
I know that area well. At least in the neighouring Low Country (SC) Sea Islands. Many places around there palmettos are scattered through the woods. Very numerous and visible sometimes, like in places around Hilton Head and Beaufort. The woods in north and central Florida are loaded with all kinds of native palmettos, growing like dandelions, and I don't think they look out of place, in fact their woods look better to me.

But I realize you lived around Savannah GA so I'm probably not telling you anything new.

BTW the pine woods I've seen around Savannah GA and Low Country SC don't look especially tall and thick to me. At least compared to places like central NC.

Do pines grow smaller and/or slower in TX?
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Old 04-25-2007, 11:43 AM
 
Location: In God
3,073 posts, read 10,772,603 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
I know that area well. At least in the neighouring Low Country (SC) Sea Islands. Many places around there palmettos are scattered through the woods. Very numerous and visible sometimes, like in places around Hilton Head and Beaufort. The woods in north and central Florida are loaded with all kinds of native palmettos, growing like dandelions, and I don't think they look out of place, in fact their woods look better to me.

But I realize you lived around Savannah GA so I'm probably not telling you anything new.

BTW the pine woods I've seen around Savannah GA and Low Country SC don't look especially tall and thick to me. At least compared to places like central NC.

Do pines grow smaller and/or slower in TX?
The pines in Texas are a little shorter and a little bit more scattered.

Now as far as the pines in Georgia, Savannah not so much, but where I lived (Augusta, GA. About an hour up the river) certain areas were so thick with pines it seemed almost inpenetrable. You drive on the freeway and looking out, you can't even see the city because it's almost completely canopied in pines. Except for the downtown area and the places where there's construction. It's like a city hidden in the woods to me.
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Old 04-25-2007, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
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Originally Posted by mpope409 View Post
The pines in Texas are a little shorter and a little bit more scattered.

Now as far as the pines in Georgia, Savannah not so much, but where I lived (Augusta, GA. About an hour up the river) certain areas were so thick with pines it seemed almost inpenetrable. You drive on the freeway and looking out, you can't even see the city because it's almost completely canopied in pines. Except for the downtown area and the places where there's construction. It's like a city hidden in the woods to me.
Is there much of a canopy in and around towns in East TX?

To me the woods all the way up I-95 though the Carolinas had approximately the same denisty. I'm familiar with seeing at least some part, in some places nearly all of the horizon completely blocked by a 40 foot or higher treeline.
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Old 04-25-2007, 01:59 PM
 
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People who first are true Americans and support our troops and president.... Even in un-popular times. That before we are conservatives and liberals, we all are American first. If we disagree with our current govermant. That we are not critics out in public, because what message do send to the rest of the world? And specially our enemies. They see that we are falling appart and wash our dirty laundry out in public. Rosie O'Donnel is so UN-AMERICAN. CONSPIRACY believers, GET OUT OF OUR CUTY!! Grow up becasue being rebellious just isn't cool any more.

That's what's important. That's what makes a good city. Starting with our fundumental values, then the rest we can tackle together.
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Old 04-25-2007, 02:02 PM
 
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Default Good City? Good Fundamental Values First !!!

People who first are true Americans and support our troops and president.... Even in un-popular times. That before we are conservatives and liberals, we all are American first. If we disagree with our current govermant. That we are not critics out in public, because what message do send to the rest of the world? And specially our enemies. They see that we are falling appart and wash our dirty laundry out in public. Rosie O'Donnel is so UN-AMERICAN. CONSPIRACY believers, GET OUT OF OUR CUTY!! Grow up becasue being rebellious just isn't cool any more.

That's what's important. That's what makes a good city. Starting with our fundumental values, then the rest we can tackle together.
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Old 04-25-2007, 06:45 PM
 
Location: In God
3,073 posts, read 10,772,603 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
Is there much of a canopy in and around towns in East TX?

To me the woods all the way up I-95 though the Carolinas had approximately the same denisty. I'm familiar with seeing at least some part, in some places nearly all of the horizon completely blocked by a 40 foot or higher treeline.
In southeast Texas, only parts of the land have a canopy of pines, but nothing like Georgia. A lot of is just small scattered groups.
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Old 04-26-2007, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
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Originally Posted by mpope409 View Post
In southeast Texas, only parts of the land have a canopy of pines, but nothing like Georgia. A lot of is just small scattered groups.
How about the treeline? Is that still about as dense, but a mixed of pines and hardwoods, or are the woods themselves more scattered pockets?

Some parts of the southeast U.S., it looks like a wall of trees and to put roads it looks like they have to take a chunk or notch out of the surrounding forest.
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Old 04-26-2007, 01:55 PM
 
Location: In God
3,073 posts, read 10,772,603 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
How about the treeline? Is that still about as dense, but a mixed of pines and hardwoods, or are the woods themselves more scattered pockets?

Some parts of the southeast U.S., it looks like a wall of trees and to put roads it looks like they have to take a chunk or notch out of the surrounding forest.
Well, kind of but not really. I guess you would have to see Houston for yourself to be able to distinguish between the two. All I know is that in Augusta it's like you can't escape the jungle of pines. So beautiful.
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