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Old 07-31-2009, 08:44 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
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Can't remember if someone has posted this before, but it is interesting to listen to the different styles/accents of speech given regional affiliation. I thought it was pretty interesting how different (yet in an odd way similar) the Southern accents were.

If you can make it through all 4 minutes of the video with out dozing off, well done.

Here it is:
YouTube - American Accents
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Old 07-31-2009, 08:52 PM
 
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Here is a New Jersey accent:


YouTube - Vito From Jersey -- Americans traveling in Italy
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Old 07-31-2009, 10:10 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
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Hahaha! His accent is definitely of that "tougher" strain.

I like it....all Tony Soprano like.
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Old 07-31-2009, 10:33 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
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The Michigan accent... a few examples


YouTube - B-93 Birthday Bash concertgoers stranded by flood waters
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Old 07-31-2009, 11:34 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michigan83 View Post
Goodstuff!

The way the guy said "truck" was definitely different than how I would say it....I think it would be a little more drawn out with my Okie twang.

I cracked up at the girl's voice = took me back to the movie Fargo.
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Old 08-01-2009, 02:51 AM
 
Location: California
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I don't think that was a good example of a Texas accent.. I have found there to be a few different accents in Texas anyway.
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Old 08-01-2009, 05:54 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michigan83 View Post
The Michigan accent... a few examples
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bass&Catfish2008 View Post
Goodstuff!

The way the guy said "truck" was definitely different than how I would say it....I think it would be a little more drawn out with my Okie twang.

I cracked up at the girl's voice = took me back to the movie Fargo.

Yep, that is West Michigan alright! I don't hear "Fargo" in there though Must be too close to home to catch it. (That video was shot an hour south of me)
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Old 08-01-2009, 08:20 AM
 
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This video shows the range of typical Central Upstate NY accents (including the commercial!). One of the women speaking is probably from a little further downstate. The older gentleman talks like many older upstaters with certain ethnic backgrounds do ("HO-tel" for "hotel")


Click here for video: Local - NewsChannel 9 WSYR

The Central NY accent is quite similar to Michigan's, except it sounds less "Fargo"-ish. (No, Michigan speakers don't sound just like they're from "Fargo," only slightly)

In Western NY they talk just a little different from CNY. A little more like Ohioans.

This is a map of the Northern Cities Vowel Shift, a particular kind of American accent group which shows that people in these areas have many things about their accents in common:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...owel_Shift.svg

(I salute my Michigan brothers and sisters in "flat A-ness")
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Old 08-01-2009, 08:25 AM
 
Location: Denver via Austin
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I found it interesting that there was a "General American" accent and then a "Standard". I had never thought about it before, but the accents used in the media 50 years ago are clearly different from the ones used today. When I think of the General American accent, I think of the Standard, not the one used in some of the older movies. I think that shows that our idea of what a "neutral" accent is changes over time.
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Old 08-01-2009, 09:29 AM
 
Location: New Hampshire
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Some excellent examples of Maine accents (very similar to New Hampshire accents):


YouTube - The Fair
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