U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-28-2007, 06:27 PM
 
Location: :0)1 CORINTHIANS,13*"KYRIE, ELEISON"*"CHRISTE ELEISON"🙏 ❄⭐🎄⛄
2,707 posts, read 5,135,667 times
Reputation: 4739

Advertisements

Hello MOMARK!

Thank you so much for your response!

I am sorry that you had 4 tornadoes around your area at once! (in 2006) That sounds awful!
I saw on CNN the report from the tornado that swept central FL recently, and it looked like a bomb had hit the place! And since it took place at around 3:00 am (if I remember correctly) everyone was sleeping! It looked horrible!
I also saw a portion of a special on tornadoes, they showed one in Oklahoma, Texas, I cannot remember the rest, but everything was destroyed!
And I think that it is sad that a lot of the states mentioned above, tend to have affordable housing compared to the rest of the country. Places like Kansas, MO, etc. But then you have to deal with this every year!
Anyway, thanks for always responding to everyone on this forum. You always seem to have a wealth of information! And it is very much appreciated!
Have a great day! Take care,
Countrylv22
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-28-2007, 06:58 PM
 
Location: :0)1 CORINTHIANS,13*"KYRIE, ELEISON"*"CHRISTE ELEISON"🙏 ❄⭐🎄⛄
2,707 posts, read 5,135,667 times
Reputation: 4739
Thumbs up To Kewgee! Thank You So Much!

Hello KewGee!

Thank you so much for the link! GREAT INFO!

And I guess there is no way to get away from them!
You have been very helpful!
Countrylv22
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2007, 07:02 PM
 
Location: :0)1 CORINTHIANS,13*"KYRIE, ELEISON"*"CHRISTE ELEISON"🙏 ❄⭐🎄⛄
2,707 posts, read 5,135,667 times
Reputation: 4739
Thumbs up To Poprocksncoke ! Thank You!

Hello there!

That sounds terrible! To be on the highway in the middle of a tornado! NOT FUN!
Thanks for the reply! I appreciate your help!
Take care,
COUNTRYLV22
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2007, 07:09 PM
 
Location: :0)1 CORINTHIANS,13*"KYRIE, ELEISON"*"CHRISTE ELEISON"🙏 ❄⭐🎄⛄
2,707 posts, read 5,135,667 times
Reputation: 4739
Thumbs up To Prango! Thank You!

Hello PRANGO!

I hope that your weather has calmed down a bit! And that you are well!

TORNADO ALLEY DOES NOT SOUND LIKE FUN! And it covers SO SO SO MANY STATES! WOW!
Anyway, thanks for the response! I really appreciate it!
Countrylv22


TO: MOMOF2DFW!

Hello there! Thank you so much for your input!
So we are in right in the middle of it! SPRING!
Countrylv22
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2007, 08:17 PM
 
22 posts, read 67,943 times
Reputation: 30
I've been in one tornado (in Minnesota) and it was certainly frightening. But I'd rather live, as I do, in a tornado-prone state (Illinois) than in one prone to wildfires or hurricanes, which cover a much wider territory and can cause so much more destruction. My mother still lives in Pittsburgh, where I grew up, and points out the relative lack of natural disasters. I guess the north east part of the country is the safest in that regard. But if you look for a place to be perfectly safe, you could wind up driving yourself nuts - what about crime? Pollution? Nuclear reactors? There's nowhere to go! So just relax.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2007, 09:31 PM
 
Location: Way on the outskirts of LA LA land.
3,040 posts, read 10,445,409 times
Reputation: 1927
I know that there have been tornadoes in all of the lower 48 U.S. states, but as you've already read, the "Tornado Alley" area gets hit the worst. In my lifetime, I can remember hearing about somewhere near a half dozen that have caused property damage in Southern California. Here, there is a good possibility of damage from any tornado that forms, for the simple reason that it's so crowded. Usually, though, it's something like a mobile home or a storage shed that gets damaged or destroyed.

I think tktez has a good point about the widespread damage from hurricanes and wildfires. We have severe wildfires every year, and the damage can be extensive. There have been times where whole neighborhoods have been destroyed by fire, with something like 200 or more homes being destroyed. The other disaster that California has is, of course, earthquakes. When we get a severe one, tens or hundreds of thousands of homes become damaged or destroyed.

In terms of probability, I think your chance of losing your home to a tornado is very low compared to earthquakes, hurricanes, or wildfires.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-29-2007, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Deep In The Heat Of Texas
2,639 posts, read 2,458,564 times
Reputation: 700
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdavid93225 View Post
I know that there have been tornadoes in all of the lower 48 U.S. states, but as you've already read, the "Tornado Alley" area gets hit the worst. In my lifetime, I can remember hearing about somewhere near a half dozen that have caused property damage in Southern California. Here, there is a good possibility of damage from any tornado that forms, for the simple reason that it's so crowded. Usually, though, it's something like a mobile home or a storage shed that gets damaged or destroyed.

I think tktez has a good point about the widespread damage from hurricanes and wildfires. We have severe wildfires every year, and the damage can be extensive. There have been times where whole neighborhoods have been destroyed by fire, with something like 200 or more homes being destroyed. The other disaster that California has is, of course, earthquakes. When we get a severe one, tens or hundreds of thousands of homes become damaged or destroyed.

In terms of probability, I think your chance of losing your home to a tornado is very low compared to earthquakes, hurricanes, or wildfires.

I think the count of tens or hundreds of thousands of homes becoming damaged or detroyed in one CA quake is a little high. I did a little research and in the past 56 years, only 214 people were killed in CA quakes. I could not find a $ amount of damage, although I don't doubt it's high considering the costs of property out there.

In CA, wildfires in the past 56 years have killed only 30 people and the property damage totalled to $3.882 billion. Again, the costs of homes are out of sight.

In Florida, hurricanes in the past 56 years have killed 620 people with $32.500billion in property damage, another high cost of homes area. I believe many of those deaths were caused by tornadoes that form with the hurricanes.

Tornadoes are actually the most violent of all storms on Earth.

In Texas, I could not get a reading of all the tornadoes as there were too many for the web site to list, a total of 7,601, so I did a search for the F3s or higher. 466 people have been killed with $1.906 billion in property. Of course, the houses in Texas are much less money than CA or FL and there is so much country land in TX that I feel certain many tornadoes hit those areas as well avoiding property damage and deaths.

I don't feel the most important thing about any disaster is losing one's home but losing one's life. Homes can be replaced, lives cannot. With that being said, I believe it's the hurricanes with tornadoes within them that kill the most people, followed by tornadoes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-30-2007, 12:12 AM
 
Location: Way on the outskirts of LA LA land.
3,040 posts, read 10,445,409 times
Reputation: 1927
Quote:
Originally Posted by KewGee View Post

I think the count of tens or hundreds of thousands of homes becoming damaged or detroyed in one CA quake is a little high. I did a little research and in the past 56 years, only 214 people were killed in CA quakes. I could not find a $ amount of damage, although I don't doubt it's high considering the costs of property out there.

In CA, wildfires in the past 56 years have killed only 30 people and the property damage totalled to $3.882 billion. Again, the costs of homes are out of sight.

In Florida, hurricanes in the past 56 years have killed 620 people with $32.500billion in property damage, another high cost of homes area. I believe many of those deaths were caused by tornadoes that form with the hurricanes.

Tornadoes are actually the most violent of all storms on Earth.

In Texas, I could not get a reading of all the tornadoes as there were too many for the web site to list, a total of 7,601, so I did a search for the F3s or higher. 466 people have been killed with $1.906 billion in property. Of course, the houses in Texas are much less money than CA or FL and there is so much country land in TX that I feel certain many tornadoes hit those areas as well avoiding property damage and deaths.

I don't feel the most important thing about any disaster is losing one's home but losing one's life. Homes can be replaced, lives cannot. With that being said, I believe it's the hurricanes with tornadoes within them that kill the most people, followed by tornadoes.
The reason I said what I did about the damage from the earthquakes in California is that I've seen the damage first hand. In the 1994 Northridge earthquake, there were very few homes in the San Fernando, Simi, and Santa Clarita Valleys that were not damaged to some extent. The total population of these areas is well over 1 million people. I am not suggesting that most of their homes were unable to be occupied, but many suffered damage, from minor to severe. I don't recall the figures for the cost of the damage, but I know it was in the Billions of dollars. While it's true that not many lost their lives (Thank God), there were a lot of people displaced by the earthquake. Some left for good, while others moved back home when their homes were again able to be occupied. The 1906 San Francisco earthquake was worse than the Northridge quake in terms of damage and loss of life, since huge portions of the city burned to the ground as a result of fires caused by the earthquake. The damage to the city made it difficult, if not impossible to fight the fires, and they spread rapidly throughout the city. There have been estimates that as many as 3000 people lost their lives in that event.

The severity of the wildfires in California is nowhere near that of the earthquakes, but there have been some that caused a significant amount of damage. I don't remember the year (early 80's, I think), but there was a wildfire in the Oakland, CA area that destroyed at least 200 homes, possibly many more. The number of folks that have lost their lives in this type of event are generally pretty low due to the amount of warning people have, and effective evacuation procedures.

I am not in any way trying to minimize the destructive force of tornadoes or hurricanes. The record books are full of events that at one time were among the worst in our nation's history. Most of these have been hurricanes. On a global scale, there have been severe events that have killed hundreds of thousands of people, ranging from earthquakes to hurricanes to severe floods. There have even been volcanic events that have killed tens of thousands of people. All of this information was easily obtained by searching the internet.

To back up your final point, the worst single tornado disaster this country has ever seen was back in 1925, when one tornado killed over 600 people across three states. Considering the relatively sparse population in our country at that time, that is a very deadly storm. If it were to happen in the same place today, I would not be at all surprised for the death toll to be ten times that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-30-2007, 09:56 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,901,869 times
Reputation: 660
Tornado states are basically Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Missouri, Kansas, Iowa, and Nebraska. Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio have just as much potential for tornadoes however as these states.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top