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Old 04-27-2007, 07:47 PM
 
Location: Deep In The Heat Of Texas
2,639 posts, read 2,463,056 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mpope409 View Post
I still tremble when I think about Katrina. So sad, but I can't for the life of me understand why so many people didn't leave when they informed to do so.

It could be the same reason many don't take shelter when a tornado threat is issued. They just don't take the warnings seriously. So many people are just so non-chalant when it comes to storms of any kinds, and I just don't get it.
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Old 04-27-2007, 08:03 PM
 
Location: In God
3,073 posts, read 10,771,583 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KewGee View Post

It could be the same reason many don't take shelter when a tornado threat is issued. They just don't take the warnings seriously. So many people are just so non-chalant when it comes to storms of any kinds, and I just don't get it.
Now, I do understand that there were some people who simply couldn't leave. But I get upset when I think about people who risked their children's lives all because they didn't want to leave. All I know is that if I'm ever in any storm warning, I'm doing whatever I can to be safe.
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Old 04-30-2007, 07:51 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,396 posts, read 59,890,532 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KewGee View Post

It could be the same reason many don't take shelter when a tornado threat is issued. They just don't take the warnings seriously.
Does this have to do with the slim chance that a tornado, when a general warning is issued, will hit your house directly, or because of the increased plethora of weather forecasters crying wolf day in and day out? I don't know how many times I've heard the warning sirens going off when the sun was shining and there wasn't a cloud in the sky, because a tornado watch had been issued. Not a warning. It's maddening, and frankly, an abuse of power.

Quote:
So sad, but I can't for the life of me understand why so many people didn't leave when they informed to do so.
Most of the people that stayed behind had no means to leave the city.
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Old 04-30-2007, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Gulfport, MS
469 posts, read 2,557,223 times
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Lots of people in New Orleans didn't have a car, gas money, or any place to go even if they did have a car and gas. Same for lots of folks in Mississippi and across South Louisiana. You pack up and leave, you'll be paying $100+ a day for food and board and a lot of people simply cannot afford that. As for flying out, the airport closed a few days before Katrina hit, so that by the time it was obvious the hurricane was heading that way, it was too late to get a plane out. People were siphoning gas out of other people's cars trying to escape. You can't outwalk a hurricane, and even if you could, New Orleans is surrounded by swamp filled with snakes and gators.

I just plain got lucky, I went down to NO for my brother's wedding and happened to fly out a week before Katrina. Otherwise, I probably would've drowned or had to be airlifted out along with all them other people.
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Old 04-30-2007, 02:39 PM
 
Location: In God
3,073 posts, read 10,771,583 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Does this have to do with the slim chance that a tornado, when a general warning is issued, will hit your house directly, or because of the increased plethora of weather forecasters crying wolf day in and day out? I don't know how many times I've heard the warning sirens going off when the sun was shining and there wasn't a cloud in the sky, because a tornado watch had been issued. Not a warning. It's maddening, and frankly, an abuse of power.
These people are paid to keep us informed on the weather. They're just doing their job and it's important to take heed to their predictions whether you think it's silly or not. They're trained in this. We're not.


Quote:
Most of the people that stayed behind had no means to leave the city.
I was aware that some people had no choice but to stay (as I stated in my post), but I wouldn't say it was most of the people.
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Old 04-30-2007, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Gulfport, MS
469 posts, read 2,557,223 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mpope409 View Post
These people are paid to keep us informed on the weather. They're just doing their job and it's important to take heed to their predictions whether you think it's silly or not. They're trained in this. We're not.


I was aware that some people had no choice but to stay (as I stated in my post), but I wouldn't say it was most of the people.

Where you there? Did you have to chose to abandon your home? People made the best choice that they could under the circumstances -- and many had no choice. Hindsight is 20/20! You may look at the situation in New Orleans and South MS and think to yourself, Well I would've done such and such and such and such... but until you actually face a natural disaster you don't know what you would chose to do.
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Old 04-30-2007, 05:52 PM
 
Location: In God
3,073 posts, read 10,771,583 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mississippienne View Post
Where you there? Did you have to chose to abandon your home? People made the best choice that they could under the circumstances -- and many had no choice. Hindsight is 20/20! You may look at the situation in New Orleans and South MS and think to yourself, Well I would've done such and such and such and such... but until you actually face a natural disaster you don't know what you would chose to do.
Well I never claimed to realize what they were going through and I wasn't blaming anyone, so please don't attack me. I said that I was very aware that quite several people couldn't leave, but I remember hearing on the radio, a mother called into the station while she was leaving New Orleans and she was telling the radio jock about how her son and numerous other people she knew decided not to leave just because they didn't want to. They had every opportunity and everything they needed in order to leave but they didn't because they didn't take the warning seriously. I mean for real, don't try to make me feel guilty about telling the truth.

I sympathize completely for the people who had no choice but to stay. And all I was saying to Ohiogirl is that we need to learn from Katrina, so from now on when we are told to take precaution when a dangerous storm is expected, we need to do just that.
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Old 04-30-2007, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Gulfport, MS
469 posts, read 2,557,223 times
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I jumped like I did because I'm sick and tired of hearing everyone blaming what happened on the people of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast. It's really annoying to hear lots of well-meaning lectures on "well, here's what you SHOULD have done" as though so-and-so knows any better than the people who actually lived there and lived through Katrina.

New Orleans and the Gulf Coast are in areas in danger of being flooded and destroyed by hurricanes. This is true. It's also true that there is nowhere on this planet that is 100% safe. In the North you have ice-storms. In California you have earthquakes. In some states you have mudslides, volcanoes, wildfires, Tornado Alley, etc. No matter where you move, you can get wiped off the face of the earth by a natural disaster.

The people worst affected by Hurricane Katrina were also the people who could least afford to be affected. Anyone with money, means, and initiative escaped. The ones left behind were poor, sick, too old, too young to make it out. People talk like it's so easy to just pack up and leave. Newsflash: you need a car, a truck, a bus, or some kind of transportation. You cannot outwalk a hurricane, and even if you could, you'd be running in 90+ degree heat with 100% humidity, in August, through swamps filled with alligators, venomous snakes, and who knows what else. Lots of folks in New Orleans didn't own cars. Why should they? They live in a city with mass transit, they're poor, and they may never have left the city their whole lives. Even if you had a car, it was hard to find gas for it, especially when the gas stations closed down as everyone fled the hurricane.

New Orleans especially has its own unique culture. There are people there, such as Creoles, where New Orleans is their whole world. Their families have lived there for hundreds of years. They don't know anything else. They don't want to just abandon their homes. They may well be uninsured, and if they leave their homes, they're scared to come back and find them looted. Besides, if you live with hurricane warnings every year, and nothing comes of it for decades, yes, you'd be nonchalant about hearing yet another one. Californians are the same way, how many years have there been predictions of "The Big One", and yet I don't see a mass exodus of L.A. every time there's a tremor.

There may well have been people who willingly stayed. They probably stayed because they didn't think it would be that bad, because they wanted to protect their belongings, because they didn't have anywhere else to go. Whatever their reasons were, they ended up just as hungry, just as terrified, just as desperate, and in some cases just as dead as the people who couldn't leave because of poverty.

Last edited by Mississippienne; 04-30-2007 at 06:23 PM.. Reason: spelling
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Old 04-30-2007, 10:33 PM
 
Location: In God
3,073 posts, read 10,771,583 times
Reputation: 510
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mississippienne View Post
I jumped like I did because I'm sick and tired of hearing everyone blaming what happened on the people of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast. It's really annoying to hear lots of well-meaning lectures on "well, here's what you SHOULD have done" as though so-and-so knows any better than the people who actually lived there and lived through Katrina.

New Orleans and the Gulf Coast are in areas in danger of being flooded and destroyed by hurricanes. This is true. It's also true that there is nowhere on this planet that is 100% safe. In the North you have ice-storms. In California you have earthquakes. In some states you have mudslides, volcanoes, wildfires, Tornado Alley, etc. No matter where you move, you can get wiped off the face of the earth by a natural disaster.

The people worst affected by Hurricane Katrina were also the people who could least afford to be affected. Anyone with money, means, and initiative escaped. The ones left behind were poor, sick, too old, too young to make it out. People talk like it's so easy to just pack up and leave. Newsflash: you need a car, a truck, a bus, or some kind of transportation. You cannot outwalk a hurricane, and even if you could, you'd be running in 90+ degree heat with 100% humidity, in August, through swamps filled with alligators, venomous snakes, and who knows what else. Lots of folks in New Orleans didn't own cars. Why should they? They live in a city with mass transit, they're poor, and they may never have left the city their whole lives. Even if you had a car, it was hard to find gas for it, especially when the gas stations closed down as everyone fled the hurricane.

New Orleans especially has its own unique culture. There are people there, such as Creoles, where New Orleans is their whole world. Their families have lived there for hundreds of years. They don't know anything else. They don't want to just abandon their homes. They may well be uninsured, and if they leave their homes, they're scared to come back and find them looted. Besides, if you live with hurricane warnings every year, and nothing comes of it for decades, yes, you'd be nonchalant about hearing yet another one. Californians are the same way, how many years have there been predictions of "The Big One", and yet I don't see a mass exodus of L.A. every time there's a tremor.

There may well have been people who willingly stayed. They probably stayed because they didn't think it would be that bad, because they wanted to protect their belongings, because they didn't have anywhere else to go. Whatever their reasons were, they ended up just as hungry, just as terrified, just as desperate, and in some cases just as dead as the people who couldn't leave because of poverty.
And I agree. Part of me feels that the nation didn't really care because of the color and social class of a majority of the people the hurricane affected.

And I do understand certain people not leaving, but this should be a lesson to many, that we should never underestimate the power of nature, and that when the silly little weather man tells us that danger is possible, we need to listen.
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