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Old 04-26-2007, 05:42 AM
 
Location: York, UK
89 posts, read 345,805 times
Reputation: 29

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Hi all,
This maybe a dumbass question but I'll ask anyway. As a Brit that considers 80mph winds bad how do you guys cope with hurricanes/tornados and are their things that can help protect yourself and your property? I guess we see only the very worse things on the news regarding hurricanes and tornado damage on the news in the UK. I've travelled around the US on vacations for the last 25 years but fortunately not been close to any hurricanes or tornado's. Thanks.
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Old 04-26-2007, 07:33 AM
 
Location: NOTfromhere, Indiana
341 posts, read 1,368,301 times
Reputation: 203
Hurricane: You pack up your Chihuahua and leave. Go visit Aunt Mable who lives in nice safe Nevada.

Tornado: You grab a pitcher of margarita's, a flashlite, your Chihuahua and your cell phone,to gab at your Aunt Mable who lives in nice safe Nevada while you sit in your cellar.
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Old 04-26-2007, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,364 posts, read 59,796,813 times
Reputation: 54006
At least with hurricanes you get a day or two warning. With tornadoes, you're lucky if you get any warning at all.

There's no protecting your property from a tornado, if it bears down on your home. You just hope for the best. Tornado damage is horrific, and often the most horrific thing is that it can destroy one house, but the house next door can be untouched. There's no explaining it.

And by all means, if you live in Tornado Alley, avoid living in mobile homes if at all possible. Those things are tornado magnets.

Coyote_Blond, you forgot to include shoes! After the tornado flattens your house, you don't want to pick through all that rubble in your bare feet.
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Old 04-27-2007, 10:46 AM
 
Location: NOTfromhere, Indiana
341 posts, read 1,368,301 times
Reputation: 203
Upside:

Hurricane: You'll suddenly get that pool or oceanside house you wanted.

Tornado: You might inherit the guys down the block new Dodge Viper you've been wanting.
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Old 04-27-2007, 10:57 AM
 
1,229 posts, read 3,153,549 times
Reputation: 286
After living through my first hurricane in Williamsburg, Va, and knowing it was only a weak one, I deceided to start making plans to move, never want to live through that again!!! It was totally amazing that no died too. They put up hurricane gates on the interstate in Hampton Roads and its rather errie to see as well...glad to be leaving for many reasons and this being one of them!
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Old 04-27-2007, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska (moving to Ohio)
673 posts, read 3,751,948 times
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I am in tornado Alley now and grew up on the edge of tornado alley.

Basically, tornado's tend be very, very isolated and very localized events.
Most tornado's might be on the ground a few minutes at most and alot of them only have the winds typical of a strong mountain gust of wind.

The powerful tornado's are very, very rare and like alot of others are very, very localized in nature.
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Old 04-27-2007, 12:11 PM
 
Location: In God
3,073 posts, read 10,766,415 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MattDen View Post

The powerful tornado's are very, very rare
Not to mention, quite possibly the most terrifying thing ever.
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Old 04-27-2007, 12:14 PM
 
Location: In God
3,073 posts, read 10,766,415 times
Reputation: 510
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
At least with hurricanes you get a day or two warning. With tornadoes, you're lucky if you get any warning at all.

There's no protecting your property from a tornado, if it bears down on your home. You just hope for the best. Tornado damage is horrific, and often the most horrific thing is that it can destroy one house, but the house next door can be untouched. There's no explaining it.

And by all means, if you live in Tornado Alley, avoid living in mobile homes if at all possible. Those things are tornado magnets.

Coyote_Blond, you forgot to include shoes! After the tornado flattens your house, you don't want to pick through all that rubble in your bare feet.
Actually, with all of this modern technology, it's rather unlikely that a tornado should come become hours and hours of being forewarned.
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Old 04-27-2007, 12:57 PM
 
Location: Gulfport, MS
469 posts, read 2,555,950 times
Reputation: 496
When I was a kid, we had a couple close brushes with tornados, but never suffered anything worse than a downed tree. Hurricanes are mega-storms that have the ability to kill or displace THOUSANDS of people. I know people who floated out of their houses on doors or furniture when Katrina hit. Other people, the unlucky ones, washed up on the beaches. I myself flew out of New Orleans about a week before Katrina hit, and if I'd missed my flight or been stranded, I would've been one of those people dying on the roof of a house. Even now, I get panicky in the summer time when hurricane season starts to roll around again.
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Old 04-27-2007, 01:54 PM
 
Location: In God
3,073 posts, read 10,766,415 times
Reputation: 510
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mississippienne View Post
When I was a kid, we had a couple close brushes with tornados, but never suffered anything worse than a downed tree. Hurricanes are mega-storms that have the ability to kill or displace THOUSANDS of people. I know people who floated out of their houses on doors or furniture when Katrina hit. Other people, the unlucky ones, washed up on the beaches. I myself flew out of New Orleans about a week before Katrina hit, and if I'd missed my flight or been stranded, I would've been one of those people dying on the roof of a house. Even now, I get panicky in the summer time when hurricane season starts to roll around again.
I still tremble when I think about Katrina. So sad, but I can't for the life of me understand why so many people didn't leave when they informed to do so.
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