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Old 04-27-2007, 12:07 AM
 
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska (moving to Ohio)
673 posts, read 3,753,447 times
Reputation: 474

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*sorry about the smiling face, it should be a question face.

I was wondering if there is a wide income disparity of if your community is very divided and very economically segregated?

In Lincoln, Nebraska it is very divided by class here. higher-socio economic class people dont associate with lower-socio economic class people in a social setting.

Sometimes I jog in my ripped-up shorts and shirts with BBQ stains down there and old tennis shoes just to get dirty looks from those high-class south Lincolnites who have very prententious, snooty attitudes as a whole.

Last week after a jog in my ripped-up shorts, a shirt with a big BBQ stain and old tennis shoes I went to one of the grocery stores that borders an affluent area and the owners (its locally owned) looked shocked that some one like me could be walking into their grocery store. In that area of town people tend to dress up to go almost everywhere which is bizzare but I guess some people just like to make sure that they always seen in high-class designer brands.

Alot of the southern part of Lincoln is quite a few mansions sitting on large lots with lots of trees. Also, alot of brand-new huge, custom built homes with all the amenities. Also around on the southside of this community lots of people in europran SUV's.

Alot of the northern area and the central part of town are completely different though and very, very lower-socio economic class. Lots of rusted out cars, cars that have been in accidents driving around. Women with torn clothes pushing old baby strollers and alot of apartment buildings that are very blighted and quite a few condemned ones also. Not only that but lots of alcoholism on display in that area.

Lincoln is very, very divided. Only a few middle-class neighborhoods, but overall its a mix between rich (alot of very affluent farmers who have retired from farming have mansions here) and relatively poor neighborhoods that are very run-down.

Alot of what suprising is just how segregated the rich and poor areas are. Alot of cities are somewhat integrated based on class but not Lincoln.
This cities elite wants to live far, far away from where the poorer areas.

On the other hand, Colorado Springs my hometown is very middle-of the road throughout. The poorest neighborhoods (actually they would be considered lower middle-class) in Colorado Springs are mainly clean areas with 1970s era tri-level homes with late 90s model cars while alot of the affluent neighborhoods are more upper-middle class as opposed to very affluent. Which basically means that very few people in Colorado Springs in mansions but more upper-middle class with newer homes but usually the late 90s model cars one would see in lower-middle class areas.

In Colorado Springs a neighborhood at risk for decline is one where maybe 5 houses in the entire neighborhood dont have well manicured lawns or a few homes are in need of a coat of paint.

Not only that but the supposed roughest area of Colorado Springs Hillside is just blocks from the most affluent areas of the city. I remember going through the worst neighborhood in Colorado Springs last December that everyone talks about as being so bad and mainly it was because they had maybe 10 homes in the entire neighborhood that use a coat of paint and the fact that they are very modest 2 bedroom homes from the late 1800s.

Last edited by MattDen; 04-27-2007 at 01:27 AM..
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Old 04-27-2007, 05:10 AM
 
Location: NJ
12,284 posts, read 31,777,286 times
Reputation: 5220
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattDen View Post
*sorry about the smiling face, it should be a question face.

I was wondering if there is a wide income disparity of if your community is very divided and very economically segregated?

In Lincoln, Nebraska it is very divided by class here. higher-socio economic class people dont associate with lower-socio economic class people in a social setting.

Sometimes I jog in my ripped-up shorts and shirts with BBQ stains down there and old tennis shoes just to get dirty looks from those high-class south Lincolnites who have very prententious, snooty attitudes as a whole.

Last week after a jog in my ripped-up shorts, a shirt with a big BBQ stain and old tennis shoes I went to one of the grocery stores that borders an affluent area and the owners (its locally owned) looked shocked that some one like me could be walking into their grocery store. In that area of town people tend to dress up to go almost everywhere which is bizzare but I guess some people just like to make sure that they always seen in high-class designer brands.

Alot of the southern part of Lincoln is quite a few mansions sitting on large lots with lots of trees. Also, alot of brand-new huge, custom built homes with all the amenities. Also around on the southside of this community lots of people in europran SUV's.

Alot of the northern area and the central part of town are completely different though and very, very lower-socio economic class. Lots of rusted out cars, cars that have been in accidents driving around. Women with torn clothes pushing old baby strollers and alot of apartment buildings that are very blighted and quite a few condemned ones also. Not only that but lots of alcoholism on display in that area.

Lincoln is very, very divided. Only a few middle-class neighborhoods, but overall its a mix between rich (alot of very affluent farmers who have retired from farming have mansions here) and relatively poor neighborhoods that are very run-down.

Alot of what suprising is just how segregated the rich and poor areas are. Alot of cities are somewhat integrated based on class but not Lincoln.
This cities elite wants to live far, far away from where the poorer areas.

On the other hand, Colorado Springs my hometown is very middle-of the road throughout. The poorest neighborhoods (actually they would be considered lower middle-class) in Colorado Springs are mainly clean areas with 1970s era tri-level homes with late 90s model cars while alot of the affluent neighborhoods are more upper-middle class as opposed to very affluent. Which basically means that very few people in Colorado Springs in mansions but more upper-middle class with newer homes but usually the late 90s model cars one would see in lower-middle class areas.

In Colorado Springs a neighborhood at risk for decline is one where maybe 5 houses in the entire neighborhood dont have well manicured lawns or a few homes are in need of a coat of paint.

Not only that but the supposed roughest area of Colorado Springs Hillside is just blocks from the most affluent areas of the city. I remember going through the worst neighborhood in Colorado Springs last December that everyone talks about as being so bad and mainly it was because they had maybe 10 homes in the entire neighborhood that use a coat of paint and the fact that they are very modest 2 bedroom homes from the late 1800s.
not really. with an median family income of about $120K and a minority population of about 2%, it's kind of hard to be segregated. where I grew up however, yes, the majority of minorities lived in the projects where the white residents lived in the 1 and 2 family homes.
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Old 04-27-2007, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Wi for the summer--Vegas in the winter
653 posts, read 3,133,534 times
Reputation: 259
MILWAUKEE WI is a prime example of a major city that is highly divided/segregated by economic class. Maybe more so than any other major city in the U.S.
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Old 04-27-2007, 10:02 AM
 
1,229 posts, read 3,154,742 times
Reputation: 286
Williamsburg, Va (HAVES AND HAVES NOT)and is greatly divided, your either a millionaire or your lumped in with the poor, even if you make 65 grand a year here. If you bought a home here like 5 years ago, you got it made, try to get something nice for 200 and your be greatly disappointed.
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Old 04-27-2007, 11:23 AM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,055,227 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreggB View Post
MILWAUKEE WI is a prime example of a major city that is highly divided/segregated by economic class. Maybe more so than any other major city in the U.S.
Gregg, are you sure you don't mean segregated by race, not economic class?Admittedly, I haven't lived in MKE for awhile so maybe it's changed, but for example, when I lived there, Holton St was the dividing line between blacks and whites. East of it was almost 100% white, west was 100% black. But if you didn't see any faces, the neighborhoods immediately on either side of Holton looked the same in terms of type, age and condition of housing.
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Old 04-27-2007, 11:32 AM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,055,227 times
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Not everywhere. Here in St Paul there are some re-gentrifying neighborhoods where the economic classes live cheek-to-jowl. Cathedral Hill, which was the epicenter of St Paul's 60s racial riots, today house many highly educated, high income people. In the same block are poor minority folks who've been there since the early 60s when freeway construction displaced them from their old neighborhood. They took the place of the Cathedral Hill swells who were headed for their paradise in the suburbs.

On the other side of town is Dayton's Bluff, where lots of middle class folks live in restored Victotians on the same block as drug dealers and the unemployed, who live in the unrestored Victorians that were chopped into apartments decades ago.

The suburbs? Yes.
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Old 04-27-2007, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Pikeville, Ky.
13,573 posts, read 21,724,553 times
Reputation: 18115
Where I live, we don't usually judge our neighbors (meaning anyone within 100 miles)on how little or much money they make, or the type of dwelling they live in. I do notice that a very few (gotta be careful here) people who are transferred here because of their jobs are likely to look down their noses at us, and make fun of us..We welcome them anyway and try to make them comfortable. So, point is, WE aren't divided-Some of our visitors are, and we strive to make them whole. Ya'll come see us. We'll treat you real good
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Old 04-27-2007, 01:48 PM
 
Location: VA
786 posts, read 4,321,071 times
Reputation: 1112
Default I see nothing wrong with not mixing with poor people if you are rich and educated

I think it is a case of human nature to want to interact with people at your social and economic class or higher. It is a matter of comfort, fit, and interests also. Most poor people have a different way of living and a different subculture than rich people. They are likely to not have much in common. Also many poor people have certain social norms that are not encouraged by richer folks, they would not relate well with each other.
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Old 04-27-2007, 07:26 PM
 
Location: Wi for the summer--Vegas in the winter
653 posts, read 3,133,534 times
Reputation: 259
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Gregg, are you sure you don't mean segregated by race, not economic class?Admittedly, I haven't lived in MKE for awhile so maybe it's changed, but for example, when I lived there, Holton St was the dividing line between blacks and whites. East of it was almost 100% white, west was 100% black. But if you didn't see any faces, the neighborhoods immediately on either side of Holton looked the same in terms of type, age and condition of housing.
Milwaukee is segregated by both race AND economic class. The segregation by race is more profound, I will admit.
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Old 04-27-2007, 07:37 PM
 
Location: In God
3,073 posts, read 10,770,360 times
Reputation: 510
Default Houston

Not really, since they seem to go to school together and live amongst each other in some parts. Pretty much the way of any major-major city
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