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Old 05-02-2007, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
1,231 posts, read 3,446,294 times
Reputation: 396

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Plains10 View Post
Where is all the water going to come from when 10-15 million people live in Arizona?
I keep puzzling over that, given the fact that Vegas, Salt Lake, Los Angeles, San Diego and Phoenix are all fighting for similar sources of water that are absolutely going to dry up one of these years.

Records kept by ranchers in the 1800s show there was a 20 year drought that would completely devastate the region if it were to happen now. And it will, we just don't know when. It's good that So Cal had a very dry winter, it helps wake up the powers that be to the fact that they're eventually going to be dealing with a crisis, just as Phoenix will.
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Old 05-02-2007, 08:49 PM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,942,861 times
Reputation: 13287
Post Maps showing the current southwest/California drought (Updated Today)

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheHarvester View Post
I keep puzzling over that, given the fact that Vegas, Salt Lake, Los Angeles, San Diego and Phoenix are all fighting for similar sources of water that are absolutely going to dry up one of these years.

Records kept by ranchers in the 1800s show there was a 20 year drought that would completely devastate the region if it were to happen now. And it will, we just don't know when. It's good that So Cal had a very dry winter, it helps wake up the powers that be to the fact that they're eventually going to be dealing with a crisis, just as Phoenix will.
The drought in the southwest and California is becoming quite severe with large soil moisture deficits being reported right now. I am not a fan of deserts and dry air. That is why I prefer the moist climate in the areas of the US that are east of the Mississippi River. This river is a good dividing line separating the moist climates to the east from the dry conditions that exist in most of the west, excluding the Pacific Coast and some higher elevated mountain areas out west.
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/soilmst...full.daily.gif
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/soilmst...anom.daily.gif
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Old 05-03-2007, 07:38 AM
 
Location: mid wyoming
2,008 posts, read 6,041,282 times
Reputation: 1878
WYOMING FOR SURE they have a energy boom going on. So everything is also going out there. Hurry up or you will be left out. Hurry, hurry.
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Old 05-03-2007, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
1,231 posts, read 3,446,294 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Plains10 View Post
...I prefer the moist climate in the areas of the US that are east of the Mississippi River. This river is a good dividing line separating the moist climates to the east from the dry conditions that exist in most of the west...
First, great links! There's also this drought indicator map with links to long-range forecasts and lots of other weather info: http://drought.unl.edu/dm/monitor.html

About the dividing line, interesting you choose the river. I would place it right where I live, along the I-35 corridor or maybe 50 miles west of that corridor. Or, to make it very easy, look at the western edge of the Gulf of Mexico and draw a straight line up the middle of the country from there, that's a very good divider.

But I think you're talking about "year-round reliably green" as opposed to this transitional zone between the line from Brownsville, TX to Winnipeg and the "line" represented by the MS River. In between these boundaries there are phases of extreme drought and extreme moisture. Around Austin last year it looked like Southern California, this year it looks like a subtropical jungle in some areas, gorgeous!

Also, the wettest area east of the Cascades is near the Houston to New Orleans coast. Over 60 inches of rain per year, all west of the river. It's tough to draw perfect lines as boundaries but it's fun trying.
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Old 05-03-2007, 02:23 PM
 
Location: IN
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Post Soil Moisture

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheHarvester View Post
First, great links! There's also this drought indicator map with links to long-range forecasts and lots of other weather info: http://drought.unl.edu/dm/monitor.html

About the dividing line, interesting you choose the river. I would place it right where I live, along the I-35 corridor or maybe 50 miles west of that corridor. Or, to make it very easy, look at the western edge of the Gulf of Mexico and draw a straight line up the middle of the country from there, that's a very good divider.

But I think you're talking about "year-round reliably green" as opposed to this transitional zone between the line from Brownsville, TX to Winnipeg and the "line" represented by the MS River. In between these boundaries there are phases of extreme drought and extreme moisture. Around Austin last year it looked like Southern California, this year it looks like a subtropical jungle in some areas, gorgeous!

Also, the wettest area east of the Cascades is near the Houston to New Orleans coast. Over 60 inches of rain per year, all west of the river. It's tough to draw perfect lines as boundaries but it's fun trying.
Their are some areas west of the Mississippi River that get reliable rainfall, but only a few locations. Some of the locations are the northwest, parts of the northern Rockies, and portions of the deep south along the Gulf Coast. The more substantial soil moisture levels, however, will always be found in a bigger area geographically in areas east of the Mississppi River. Much of the precipitation in the intermountain west falls in the winter, but the summer season is quite dry. The areas that usually have higher soil moisture levels are in the northeast because they get precipitation in all seasons, and the higher latitude and cloudier climate yields lower evapotranspiration rates from the soil.
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Old 05-04-2007, 04:12 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,902,786 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheHarvester View Post
The midwest is dead. When I drove cross-country last summer (through at least 30 states plus southern Canada) I was stunned by how depressing it was in areas like Indiana, Illinois, Ohio, PA and Kentucky. Even western New York seemed very depressing, like time stood still. Horrible food, no new music, little vitality, just a feeling of dying.

With all due apologies to those who live there and like that part of the country, this was just an impression from traveling.

It's extremely vibrant along the east coast and throughout the "sun belt". The interior west is booming. The coast thrives but has major problems with crowding and prices, so this is driving a lot of growth into interior regions of the west. Salt Lake seemed super-high-energy, and even the small towns of western Colorado had great grocery stores with fresh produce and health foods, unlike the white-bread-and-margarine stores of small town Indiana.

Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio, and Kentucky I agree are all pretty dead I agree compared to other states out there. The Midwest has seen better days.
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Old 05-05-2007, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Villanova Pa.
4,908 posts, read 12,523,477 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StuckPA View Post
Not in PA. NJ is good still though.
Huh? The unemployment rate in the Philly suburbs of Chester/Bucks/Montgomery/Delaware Counties is less than 2%.

The northeast part of the usa from DC to Boston is home to 21 of the top 32 wealthiest counties in the country.

When you talk about economic vitality of this country it begins and ends with the northeast. As long as NYC remains the financial hub of the USA and DC remains the political hub than the northeast corridor will always be the rock of the USA. You want a solid family supporting job move to the suburbs of DC/Philly/NYC/Bos
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Old 05-05-2007, 12:36 PM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,942,861 times
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Post Rural Missouri needs a boost

Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio, and Kentucky I agree are all pretty dead I agree compared to other states out there. The Midwest has seen better days.
Once Missouri gets a new governor I am hoping that they focus on economic development in rural Missouri. Rural Missouri has much higher poverty rates than compared to most rural areas in the Midwest. Rural areas of northern Missouri are doing especially poor economically with substantial job losses just in the past few years.
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Old 05-05-2007, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Concord, NC
1,418 posts, read 6,383,253 times
Reputation: 635
Some of the stronger economies I've seen.....

Charlotte
Raleigh/Durham
Nashville
Atlanta
Houston
Dallas/Ft. Worth
Phoenix
Denver
Salt Lake City
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Old 05-06-2007, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
1,231 posts, read 3,446,294 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rainrock View Post
The unemployment rate in the Philly suburbs of Chester/Bucks/Montgomery/Delaware Counties is less than 2%.

...When you talk about economic vitality of this country it begins and ends with the northeast.
Wow, I thought you were showing a bias in the "top ten city" thread but now you sound like a Chamber of Commerce ad for an entire region!

Having lived in New England, California, Seattle and Texas, and having traveled extensively many times throughout the "lower 48", I can safely say that you're exaggerating wildly. Economic vitality "begins and ends with the northeast"???

You're undermining your credibility. Yes, there's economic vitality in the Northeast. Now go do some research on growth and trade and importance of shipping ports and where entrepreneurial strength lies and where people are moving to and from...

Culturally, it's wonderful that the NE is preserving the past so well, but it's not exactly the epicenter of the future.

Am expecting a retort, so sock it to me. Hopefully we won't have our debate deleted. I'm debating in good faith that we both enjoy the topic and there's no animosity and it can somehow contribute to the mission of City-Data (if you read their rules then you know, almost everything is against their rules, it's quite a tightrope to walk...)
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