U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-11-2007, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Midwest
1,903 posts, read 7,283,363 times
Reputation: 464

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by NittanyLion View Post
State College, Pa is doing very well. Home to Penn State, the largest employer is the University. But many other things are also there, like Accuweather! SC is where Accuweather started!
I have relative that works there, other relatives in the Altoona and Clearfield areas, and my brother was at Penn State for one year. One of my favorite professors moved from Michigan to Penn State, too. Yet, they turned me down for grad school.

Do you have any statistics for State College, i.e. comparative growth numbers versus Ann Arbor, Bloomington, Champaign, Chapel Hill, Charlottesville, Madison, etc other research university towns, big and small? The last time I was in State College, it appeared to be growing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-11-2007, 09:34 PM
 
Location: northern big wonderfull (Wyoming)
150 posts, read 480,898 times
Reputation: 53
wyoming has a state unemployment rate below 4 percent and some counties are around 2 percent. Every employable person in the state has a job. Fast food is starting people at $9-12/hour in some towns and they arnt big citys bigest town in WY is around 50k people.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-11-2007, 09:58 PM
 
Location: Girard, OH
9 posts, read 80,794 times
Reputation: 13
Default agreed

Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio, and Kentucky I agree are all pretty dead I agree compared to other states out there. The Midwest has seen better days.
also agreed here. i find ohio to be extremely depressing. even when i live in a city, i still feel like there is nothing to do but go out to eat, get drunk, or go to the movies. haha. of course, i am exaggerating some, but these are the reasons i cant wait to move to an area with a warmer climate where i can do oudoor type things almost year round!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-11-2007, 10:20 PM
 
Location: Midwest
1,903 posts, read 7,283,363 times
Reputation: 464
Quote:
Originally Posted by ruggergal3 View Post
also agreed here. i find ohio to be extremely depressing. even when i live in a city, i still feel like there is nothing to do but go out to eat, get drunk, or go to the movies. haha. of course, i am exaggerating some, but these are the reasons i cant wait to move to an area with a warmer climate where i can do oudoor type things almost year round!!
Yes, you just described Akron. It's too bad, as the region has enough natural wonder and architectural history, but it's all going to pot.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-18-2007, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Henderson, NV
157 posts, read 443,755 times
Reputation: 134
Default Moody's Business Vitality Index

Moody’s Economy.com has devised a Business Vitality Index that rates the overall economic vitality of a metro area by looking a a range of factors rather than just one measure. Of the top 50, Florida led with 12 cities followed by Texas 5, California 3, Oregon 3, with 2 cities each for North Carolina, Idaho, South Dakota, North Dakota, Montana, and Utah.

Here’s the top 10 out of the 359 metros:
Austin, Tx
Fort Walton Beach, Fl
Corvallis, OR
Raleigh, NC
Fort Lauderdale, Fl
Boise City, ID
Orlando, Fl
Huntsville, Al
Sioux Falls, SD
Fargo, ND

For the rest of the top 50:
http://online.wsj.com/public/resourc...15_STATPKG.pdf

There are also other lists on the page for tax burden, poverty etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-19-2007, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
1,231 posts, read 3,447,068 times
Reputation: 396
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigreez View Post
wyoming has a state unemployment rate below 4 percent and some counties are around 2 percent. Every employable person in the state has a job. Fast food is starting people at $9-12/hour in some towns and they arnt big citys bigest town in WY is around 50k people.
Unemployment stats can be very misleading. Low unemployment doesn't mean that a place is booming, it could also mean that there aren't very many people moving there seeking work, while those who cannot find work leave the place for other areas with more opportunity. Another factor to consider is that the nice parts of Wyoming are very expensive. And the climate is extremely rugged.

In contrast, the highest unemployment areas of the country are almost always found along the southern Rio Grande river. Immigrants pouring over the border seeking work, northerners flocking to the region to escape cold winters --- lots of people seeking to be there and work, plagued with poverty, a horrible area of the country with heinous summers... Yet the economic growth rate and the opportunities for an entrepreneur along the Rio Grande are probably way beyond anything that Wyoming can offer.

A handful of counties around Brownsville has more people (labor) than the entire state of Wyoming. There's an imbalance between people seeking work and people offering it, and the explanations for these imbalances differ from place to place. My main point is that unemployment stats do not directly indicate economic growth and vitality. They simply measure the ratio of people who want to work relative to the number of people actually working, nothing more.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-19-2007, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
1,231 posts, read 3,447,068 times
Reputation: 396
Quote:
Originally Posted by desertgirl View Post
Moody’s Economy.com has devised a Business Vitality Index that rates the overall economic vitality...

Here’s the top 10 out of the 359 metros:
Austin, Tx
Fort Walton Beach, Fl
Corvallis, OR
Thanks for the info.

I'm depressed about Austin. We don't need more growth. I can't stand trying to get from one side of town to the other any more, it's merely an opportunity to listen to audio books or music while sitting in traffic that doesn't move.

Not surprised about Fort Walton, but very disappointed by that too. It's an ecologically important region with beautiful beaches AND it's prone to hurricanes.

The big surprise for me is Corvallis. Last time I was there it was a sleepy and quaint college town, quite small, very cute, and I hate to think of it booming and being inundated by transplants who will destroy the character of the place. But I can see why people would want to move there. Great university, easy access to a gorgeous coastline, easy access to Eugene and Portland, and a very mild (though drizzly, cloudy and cool) climate. What's not to like?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-19-2007, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Raleigh,NC
351 posts, read 975,368 times
Reputation: 178
Hottest Job Markets

America's best jobs in the hottest markets | 1 | Business 2.0
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-19-2007, 04:18 PM
 
Location: Raleigh,NC
351 posts, read 975,368 times
Reputation: 178
Forbes best places for business and careers:

Best Places For Business And Careers - Forbes.com
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-19-2007, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
1,231 posts, read 3,447,068 times
Reputation: 396
carolina, those are fantastic links! Thanks for posting them, and thanks to city-data for permitting hot-linking to such resources.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top