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Old 09-07-2009, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Suburban Philly
55 posts, read 181,506 times
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I would say that a cultured person is educated to some degree, well traveled domestically and internationally, is open minded, and has a broad range of tastes and a high tolerance for variety and diversity.
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Old 09-07-2009, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Hernando County, FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TehStone View Post
I would say that a cultured person is educated to some degree, well traveled domestically and internationally, is open minded, and has a broad range of tastes and a high tolerance for variety and diversity.
I think this is a very good break down of what could make someone cultured.

The high tolerance for variety and diversity being key.

The travel part is questionable. While it may help someone becoming cultured it is not a given that large amounts of travel can make someone cultured.
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Old 09-07-2009, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Suburban Philly
55 posts, read 181,506 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Peterson View Post
I think this is a very good break down of what could make someone cultured.

The high tolerance for variety and diversity being key.

The travel part is questionable. While it may help someone becoming cultured it is not a given that large amounts of travel can make someone cultured.
agreed. maybe "a variety of life experiences" would be more suitable than well traveled, but the traveling part has some merit. Could you call someone cultured who has lived in one town their whole life, never been outside a 50 mile radius of it, but has all the other qualities of a cultured person?
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Old 09-07-2009, 03:48 PM
 
Location: Concrete jungle where dreams are made of.
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In a few months I'm going to Dublin and Warsaw to experience those cultures, but I'm mostly going to Warsaw to learn about the history of that city; specifically around WW2 (finishing up another novel on that subject). Half of the trip is mostly for research. While I'm there I plan on traveling a little bit around Poland
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Old 09-07-2009, 04:11 PM
 
Location: A Cultural Backwater
225 posts, read 620,037 times
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Originally Posted by tpk-nyc View Post
There are cultured people everywhere, even in small towns. What makes New York different is the enormous number of cultured people. So many that, in Manhattan and the affluent parts of Brooklyn, they are the dominant culture. The only city that can compare is Boston.

What is the effect? For professional middle- and upper-middle-class people, it is socially unacceptable to be a philistine (just as it's unacceptable to be openly racist, homophobic or sexist). In Manhattan, being educated and (at least casually) conversant with high-culture is the norm, not the exception. What's more, even people who have no interest in music, or painting or literature have respect, or at least acceptance, of those who do.

In much of the rest of the country, high-culture is viewed with suspicion by many. Some see it as a conspiracy or even a fraud. "Cultured" people are often seen as hoity-toity and highfalutin; they are the objects of scorn and ridicule. Politicians get a lot of mileage out of mocking "cultured" people. That doesn't happen in New York. Cultured people are not perceived as a threat. Rather, they are often celebrated.

Does that mean everyone on the subway is reading Dostoevsky or listening to Stravinsky on a iPod? No, but a surprising number of people do.
I tend to agree with this post. Cultured people do not need to be of any particular socio-economic status. It is not necessary for a cultured person to prefer classical music over all other types of music, but it is necessary IMO for a cultured person to have an appreciation of the arts in general. By the "arts" I am including all performing arts, visual arts and creative arts. That doesn't necessarily mean that they need to have a Bachelor's degree or higher in the arts. Also, IMO a person does not need to enjoy every art form equally.

People whom I consider cultured also have an appreciation and knowledge of the cultures of other countries, though not necessarily their languages. Cultured people are not homophobic, racist, or otherwise unaccepting of those they consider to be "different" from themselves. Although cultured people tend to prefer large cities, there are cultured people living all over the United States, including in small towns and rural areas.
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