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Old 09-07-2009, 09:29 AM
 
Location: home is in the heart
231 posts, read 411,724 times
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I am trying to get a feel of the humidity situation in these areas. I have been to Wisconsin in the summer (and it could be stifling hot due to the humidity). I grew up in Arizona and never felt as hot as I did in Wisconsin because it was much drier in AZ. The issue is I have never been anywhere humid in the winter. I am in Utah now and we do get dreary winters (inversion/polution issues) and tons of snow and cold, but I am assuming its not the same bone chilling cold I hear about happening in the midwest and east coast.

My basic question is how do these two areas compare to each other as far as humidity tolerability in the summer and in the winter too? (talking like ohio/michigan/indiana vs new hampshire/maine) Are some areas more tolerable in the summer and winter than others? Is the midwest much more humid than the east coast?

(Looking at a chart that says 80-85 F sounds awfully nice for a summer temperature, but with humidity involved, this could still be pretty hot? And on the flip side, seeing 23-30 F in the winter seems bearable, but that is because it is, here in Utah - how about in the midwest or east coast?)

TIA for any thoughts on this, it will help us immensely before we make some trips out to the areas
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Old 09-07-2009, 10:32 AM
 
Location: New York City
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I went to college in Massachusetts and live in Minneapolis for five years.

New England has milder summers than the midwest. Also, the landscape is much more varied with the sea and mountains, so there are different ways to beat the heat.

New England, especially northern New England, does get a lot of snow, but it's not as cold as the midwest. Nothing can compare to Minnesota or Wisconsin in January. That's bone-chilling cold.
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Old 09-07-2009, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Boston Metro
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New England
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Old 09-07-2009, 10:58 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
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Actually both regions are quite dry in the winter. Summers it really depends on where you are at and how close to either the Great Lakes or the Ocean. The further away from either, the hotter it gets in the summer and the colder it gets in the winter. I have lived in Northern Maine for close to 20 years and also different parts of Michigan for 23 years. Where I was at in Maine (Caribou, Presque Isle area) it was hotter in the Summers and colder in the winter than most places I lived in Michigan. Both had about the same humidity levels, which were lower than Wisconsin. Utah gets cold, but the upper Midwest gets COLD. Minnesota and Wisconsin can dip down to some rather impressive numbers during the winter months. Northern Maine can reach those temps as well. I have seen -50 without the wind factored in in Northern Maine. At that point it doesn't really matter how humid it is or it isn't. Where I am now it is milder winters without a lot of snow (average is about 80") and nice summers with the daily highs in the high 70's to low 80's usually and generally not high humidity levels. Our winters are a lot more mild than those just across Lake Michigan because the Lake tends to moderate the weather keeping it warmer than just 60 or 80 miles away in Wisconsin in the winter and cooler in the Summers.
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Old 09-07-2009, 02:32 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
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inland heating and cooling effect... i hope you are not coming to upper midwest expecting 23-30..add a - to the front of that, then maybe.
tpk-nyc said it right.
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Old 09-07-2009, 02:44 PM
 
Location: St Paul, MN - NJ's Gold Coast
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The midwest stays cooler than New England for the most part.
Humidity in places Like MA, CT, and RI are definitely higher than all of the mid-west from what i could imagine... Being on the atlantic ocean calls for high humidity hands down... some of the highest humidity at that is all along the eastern Seaboard.

It also snows more in the midwest overall, but some of New England (Vermont/Maine) have some of the highest snowfalls and longest lingering winters in the country. (excluding AK)
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Old 09-07-2009, 03:30 PM
 
Location: home is in the heart
231 posts, read 411,724 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bydand View Post
Actually both regions are quite dry in the winter. Summers it really depends on where you are at and how close to either the Great Lakes or the Ocean. The further away from either, the hotter it gets in the summer and the colder it gets in the winter. I have lived in Northern Maine for close to 20 years and also different parts of Michigan for 23 years. Where I was at in Maine (Caribou, Presque Isle area) it was hotter in the Summers and colder in the winter than most places I lived in Michigan. Both had about the same humidity levels, which were lower than Wisconsin. Utah gets cold, but the upper Midwest gets COLD. Minnesota and Wisconsin can dip down to some rather impressive numbers during the winter months. Northern Maine can reach those temps as well. I have seen -50 without the wind factored in in Northern Maine. At that point it doesn't really matter how humid it is or it isn't. Where I am now it is milder winters without a lot of snow (average is about 80") and nice summers with the daily highs in the high 70's to low 80's usually and generally not high humidity levels. Our winters are a lot more mild than those just across Lake Michigan because the Lake tends to moderate the weather keeping it warmer than just 60 or 80 miles away in Wisconsin in the winter and cooler in the Summers.
That's good to know about the lake effect. We are mostly considering lower michigan, indiana/ohio area. Not really looking at wisconsin or minnesota. Do you know how these areas are as far as humidity/heat in summer and cold in the winter? Compared to new hampshire / maine? I don't think we'd be quite as far up as presque isle, more the bangor downeast area most likely. I have an inclination that the bangor area is more dry and milder summer and winter than ohio, is this true? If you were to go inland more from the coast in maine (or to new hampshire) would it be pretty comparable to upper ohio / lower michigan area?
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Old 09-07-2009, 04:30 PM
 
Location: New York City
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I worked in southern New Hampshire during the summer for several years. I loved the weather. I never found it particularly hot or humid. New England is the best part of the country to spend the summer, in my opinion.
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Old 09-07-2009, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
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Lived in IL, WI, and MA. The humidity was comparable in all areas; however, the summer temperatures in IL were about the warmest of the three.
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Old 09-07-2009, 04:50 PM
 
Location: AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emu742 View Post
I am trying to get a feel of the humidity situation in these areas. I have been to Wisconsin in the summer (and it could be stifling hot due to the humidity). I grew up in Arizona and never felt as hot as I did in Wisconsin because it was much drier in AZ.
I get soooo tired of reading stuff like this, I really do. First off, WI's summers are far, far, far, far more comfortable than AZ's. On the stickiest, hottest summer day in WI youll maybe see a heat index reach 100 degrees. Thats BELOW the AVERAGE PHX summer day, dry or not. WI might feel stickier, but it definitely does not feel hotter. Stickier, yes, but not hotter. And on those days where it does get that hot in WI, it only lasts for a day or two, then its back in the 70s and 80s (about as perfect as summer temps can get). WI's summers are generally very pleasant for the most part. AZ's are much hotter for much longer. Lets not exaggerate now shall, we?

And regarding winter, I find our winter's here in Chicagoland to be quite humid at times, but overall are VERY dry. Humidifiers and lots of lotion are needed for some people here in winter. In fact, it gets so dry here in winter at times that it makes places like AZ feel downright sticky in comparison.
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