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Old 09-27-2009, 11:48 AM
 
6,351 posts, read 13,407,247 times
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Well, yes, I don't think $100,000/year is unreasonable money for someone who's perfected their craft over many years, devoting LOTS of unpaid hours as well as paying for lots more credit hours to maintain and improve their knowledge. ESPECIALLY in the Northeast where cost of living and taxes are sky-high!!! That much longevity in a union job, a government job such as some policy wonk at the state capitol or inside the Capital Beltway pays that kind of money.

How come those that complain about teacher salaries NEVER complain about "corporate welfare"??? Why are our taxes paying for government programs that industry should be funding themselves? Why is MY trucking industry allowed to pay drivers "per diem" and get out of contributing fairly to SS, Medicare and Workman's Comp. AND get tax money to fund an idiotic "Highway Watch" program that quickly went down in flames (Because drivers have been doing it on their own all along) ...for free!

Last edited by Crew Chief; 09-28-2009 at 05:42 AM.. Reason: Add information
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Old 09-27-2009, 12:48 PM
 
75 posts, read 120,120 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PalmBch View Post
Why do Americans work so much? Compared to Europe, Americans work much much more and take off from work/vacation much less than they do in most of Europe. I also noticed that many old people (over 65 years old !) are still working in the U.S., I even saw people that are 80 working as h*ll. In Europe, and probably most other countries, very few people work after 65.
Why is it like this in the U.S., that people work a lot, goes on vacation less - some even don't, ( don't enjoy their lives outside work)?

Very interesting article:
Why Europeans Work Less Than Americans - Forbes.com

Our government does not make it possible to retire comfortably before the set retirement age. If you do they tax the hell out you. Most people are low income or middle class. Low income never can truely retire to live the so called dream, middle class scrape along like the lower class because they now no longer qualify for subsidies or assistance programs and must pay full price for everything. They struggle to save as well. Wealthy class are small group and are retired from the get go, they keep working because they are greedy and never share. When they do donate it's to other countries rather than their own. I am probably way off this and just rambling on with my own opinions so offense anyone.
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Old 09-27-2009, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Concrete jungle where dreams are made of.
8,904 posts, read 6,791,225 times
Reputation: 1819
Quote:
Originally Posted by Badger View Post
all beginning teachers in 'red' texas start between 41 - 45,000 / year. Not too shaby.

we've been talking to Rachel, a teacher on long island NY. here are some articles about pensions, benefits and salary for destitute people like her.

Rise of the Six-Figure Teacher - New York Times

TEACHING has always been known as a noble calling, but as affluent parents and administrators strive to give their children every possible advantage, it has also become a better-paid profession than in the past, with thousands of public school teachers in the New York suburbs now earning more than $100,000 a year.

One in 12 teachers in Nassau, Suffolk, Westchester, Rockland and Putnam Counties now earns more than $100,000, and the ranks are growing fast, according to an analysis of state data by The New York Times. On Long Island from 2001 to 2003 (the most recent figures available), the number grew fivefold, to 2,800, including 498 elementary school teachers, 29 physical education teachers and 83 kindergarten teachers.

Six-figure teachers are not unique to the New York suburbs. Connecticut officials reported about a dozen in 2004, and news reports indicate that some Chicago suburbs pay that much. But the highest salary for New York City teachers is $81,232, and only a handful in the rest of New York State are paid as well. In California, the highest teacher salary in 2003 was well under $100,000, according to state figures.

And despite the economy, teachers are still getting 6% pay increases.


Mar. 8, 2009 (McClatchy-Tribune Regional News delivered by Newstex) -- Even in the face of a souring economy, many Long Island school districts have approved hefty raises for teachers that soon will push salaries to more than $140,000 a year for the highest earners.
A Newsday review of 10 new teacher contracts -- all signed after experts began warning late in 2007 of looming financial troubles -- finds typical raises for the coming school year of more than 6 percent. Surpassing that, many individual teachers are due increases of better than 7 percent or 8 percent.
The raises come even as teachers unions and school districts pushed for the federal stimulus package, saying it was needed to prevent classroom layoffs. School costs account for about 66 percent of property taxes; salaries and benefits for the Island's 42,500 full-time teachers.

Central Islip's contract, signed five years ago, runs through the 2014-15 school year. By then, its top earners will be paid $173,840.
Teachers, of course, are not the only well-paid public employees. Nassau police officers, for example, earn $103,973 after eight years. In Suffolk, top scale is $97,950.

But there are 3,600 county police officers in Suffolk and Nassau combined. In contrast, the region has 42,500 full-time teachers, guidance counselors and other professionals covered by teacher contracts.
The median salary for school professionals was $77,290 in 2007, according to the state tax-relief commission. That same year, workers for other local government agencies averaged $58,790 in Suffolk and $63,320 in Nassau, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
A further advantage for teachers is that their higher wages are for a 10-month academic year. That leaves two months free for summer vacation, or for earning additional income from another job.

some info re; pensions and benefits:

Searchable database of pensions paid by New York State Teacher Retirement System

I don't teach on Long Island, I teach in NYC. Our benefits are actually quite better than the island. They have to pay for theirs, but get paid more. We get them for free, but don't make quite as much. It ends up evening out. The top salary for city teachers stands at 100,000. But that's going up in the next 2 years. We're getting an 8% raise in the next 2 years, so it will go above $100k.

That must be a really old article, or just not accurate. The top salary for city teachers isn't 83,000; 100k like I just mentioned. My husband is a 5th year teacher with some credits over his Masters degree, and makes around 61,000. I get paid $3400 extra a year for working in a school where 95% or more of the students receive free lunch. Not that many schools in the city are that high; really just the south Bronx, Harlem, and a few bad areas in Brooklyn.
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Old 09-27-2009, 03:16 PM
 
3,278 posts, read 3,146,426 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CMDallas View Post
I was listening to Lou Dobs the other day
That explains it.
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Old 09-27-2009, 04:24 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California
2,496 posts, read 5,734,568 times
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Both my parents are in education (mother is teacher, father is principal), and I respect them for doing a job that I would never have the patience for, or the tolerance for mistreatment for.
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Old 09-29-2009, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Portlandia "burbs"
8,043 posts, read 7,878,649 times
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Going back to the OP's original posting:

We can blame that a$$hole, Henry Ford, for establishing the 40-hr work weeks!

I cannot imagine people working even longer hours than that, and I know that there are plenty of workaholics out there. Not me, man. And I use my PTO (Personal Time Off) hours to get the Hell away from the job as needed. I took at least three weeks' worth of vacations this year because I'm not interested in accumulating hundreds of hours like many people do. I do keep enough in there for when I'm sick; gratefully, that doesn't occur often.

A lot of people at work wonder why and how I take so much time off. I think it's because I don't take a lot of single days off like some of them do. And, despite health issues, my attendance is pretty dang good.
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Old 09-29-2009, 05:54 PM
 
7,852 posts, read 12,754,268 times
Reputation: 2611
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluesbabe View Post
Going back to the OP's original posting:

We can blame that a$$hole, Henry Ford, for establishing the 40-hr work weeks!

I cannot imagine people working even longer hours than that, and I know that there are plenty of workaholics out there. Not me, man. And I use my PTO (Personal Time Off) hours to get the Hell away from the job as needed. I took at least three weeks' worth of vacations this year because I'm not interested in accumulating hundreds of hours like many people do. I do keep enough in there for when I'm sick; gratefully, that doesn't occur often.

A lot of people at work wonder why and how I take so much time off. I think it's because I don't take a lot of single days off like some of them do. And, despite health issues, my attendance is pretty dang good.
That's great...but exactly the point of the thread. 3 weeks worth of vacation is a very small amount compared to the amount of time off taken in many other countries.
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Old 09-29-2009, 06:56 PM
 
Location: Portlandia "burbs"
8,043 posts, read 7,878,649 times
Reputation: 17927
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
That's great...but exactly the point of the thread. 3 weeks worth of vacation is a very small amount compared to the amount of time off taken in many other countries.
Very true, indeed. I was comparing myself to those who settle for, or are stuck with, only one or two weeks per year, which is nothing. And to think that there are still employers who don't offer it at all.

I also think that many Americans don't like 'staycations', to stay home and relax or go somewhere within short driving distance. I've known of some who took a week off here 'n' there for domestic projects, which is understandable. But too many of us think we have to go somewhere to give our minds and bodies a rest. Kinda' sad, huh?
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Old 09-30-2009, 01:36 AM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,395 posts, read 14,898,134 times
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The only liberty an inferior man really cherishes is the liberty to quit work, stretch out in the sun, and scratch himself. -Mencken
...

given that...
The biggest problem many americans have is the nature of their work but...there are certainly many who choose greed over piety at the cost of their fellow man, and of course, their own happiness as well.
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Old 09-30-2009, 01:40 AM
 
Location: southern california
50,303 posts, read 47,653,355 times
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drive by the 805 see all those people in the state park living in their RV? they used to park it in front of the house and go to the park on weekends to picnic. now they live there.
and that my friend is what motivates the rest of us to keep working hard.
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