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Old 05-03-2007, 11:08 AM
Air Air started this thread
 
150 posts, read 495,827 times
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I've noticed many people on threads asking why some cities are more polluted than others, or where the pollution is, so I found this satellite photo from the University of Heidelberg in Germany from 2003. The red areas show the highest concentration of air pollution, as measured by nitrogen dioxided, followed by orange, yellow, green and finally blue.

[url]http://www.newscientist.com/data/images/ns/cms/dn6515/dn6515-1_996.jpg[url]

I hope you are able to see it!
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Old 05-03-2007, 11:12 AM
Air Air started this thread
 
150 posts, read 495,827 times
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Still can't get it to show.
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Old 05-03-2007, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
30,184 posts, read 67,327,076 times
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YUCK! Scranton sits roughly right in the middle of those two big red blobs over PA! No wonder why I coughed so hard after my run the other day that I threw up my Propel all over the pavement! Come to think of it, there is a sickening layer of smog that settles in over the city of Wilkes-Barre and much of the Wyoming Valley on excessively warm summer days; we're borrowing NYC's culture and LA's air pollution, it seems. LOL!
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Old 05-03-2007, 12:40 PM
Air Air started this thread
 
150 posts, read 495,827 times
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I actually posted this photo because of discussion from people in Pennsylvania about air pollution. What I heard is that coal burning in the Ohio River Valley has seriously polluted the East Coast. Every county in North Carolina save one gets an F for air quality from the American Lung Association, and its not even in the Red area!

Another factor affecting air quality is cars, and now with suburban sprawl, everyone is driving more and more. I started looking at areas that seemed clean on this photo, and they are --overwhelmingly unpopulated. (Northern California, the Rockies) It's very depressing. Where is this left to go?
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Old 05-03-2007, 12:45 PM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
30,184 posts, read 67,327,076 times
Reputation: 15830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Air View Post
I actually posted this photo because of discussion from people in Pennsylvania about air pollution. What I heard is that coal burning in the Ohio River Valley has seriously polluted the East Coast. Every county in North Carolina save one gets an F for air quality from the American Lung Association, and its not even in the Red area!

Another factor affecting air quality is cars, and now with suburban sprawl, everyone is driving more and more. I started looking at areas that seemed clean on this photo, and they are --overwhelmingly unpopulated. (Northern California, the Rockies) It's very depressing. Where is this left to go?

There was just an article in a local newspaper that highlighted Pennsylvania's struggles with air pollution. My best summary of it was "We only had 15 code red days last year in Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, which is an improvement over the year before." Shouldn't we be striving for no summer days when spending time outdoors can be hazardous to your health? I'll never forget one day last summer when I was driving down into the Wyoming Valley via the Cross Valley Freeway off of I-81 and saw a thin layer of smog lingering over the city of Wilkes-Barre. It makes me frightened when I realize that I work outside and have a good deal of that slop entering my lungs! Pittsburgh was just ranked as the second-most polluted city in the nation behind Los Angeles. Other PA cities didn't fare very well either, including Allentown/Bethlehem/Easton and Philadelphia. We're cursed here in PA---midway between the coal burning in the Ohio Valley and the massive sprawl-induced carbon-dioxide emissions from New Jersey and the NYC area. It's a great place to live, but our air quality is deplorable!
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Old 05-04-2007, 09:15 PM
 
1,005 posts, read 1,473,503 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScrantonWilkesBarre View Post
YUCK! Scranton sits roughly right in the middle of those two big red blobs over PA! No wonder why I coughed so hard after my run the other day that I threw up my Propel all over the pavement! Come to think of it, there is a sickening layer of smog that settles in over the city of Wilkes-Barre and much of the Wyoming Valley on excessively warm summer days; we're borrowing NYC's culture and LA's air pollution, it seems. LOL!
Scranton/W-B area is also listed as one of the worst in the country for allergy sufferers. Odd, as I have allergies/asthma, but am fine there. Perhaps depends on allergies & triggers.

The influx into some places have changed their atmospheres, too. People used to be told by dr's years ago to go into the desert for a dry climate which benefitted those with lung problems. Seems that Phoenix is now filled with some of the worst pollen around, not native to the region, as so many from other regions moved in, bringing their plants with them & successfully growing them. Amazing how we as humans, can influence so many things, whether meaning to or not.

Have fun... VV
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Old 05-05-2007, 09:49 AM
Air Air started this thread
 
150 posts, read 495,827 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KittensPurr View Post
The influx into some places have changed their atmospheres, too. People used to be told by dr's years ago to go into the desert for a dry climate which benefitted those with lung problems. Seems that Phoenix is now filled with some of the worst pollen around, not native to the region, as so many from other regions moved in, bringing their plants with them & successfully growing them. Amazing how we as humans, can influence so many things, whether meaning to or not.

Have fun... VV
I had always heard that the Southwest was great for air quality, and was really saddened to learn the it has ALREADY been ruined. That was too fast. Just so people could have certain types of potted plants.

In this state, we already hear about air pollution from the suburban sprawl and everyone driving so much, and chemical runoff into the waters from lawns. Shouldn't we stop? Gosh, the other day, someone got angry at me for putting bottles aside for recycling. They seemed to take it as a personal affront. Do people have a right to pollute?
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