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Old 09-25-2009, 11:24 AM
 
7,635 posts, read 9,488,615 times
Reputation: 9006

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Do you know this for a fact, or are you shooting from the hip? Regardless of tax rates, I am guessing the NYC school system represents a pretty big and powerful buying pool. I wouldn't doubt that they were able to cut themselves a sweet deal with the insurance companies. But I suspect there are co-pays and deductables for non-preventive services which Rachel has never seen because she's never needed that type of care.

Rachel, please weigh in.
..if this might be a "luxury" that NYC can't afford for much longer; remember, if I recall correctly, that the Big 3 Automakers in Detroit had to cut back on the health insurance benefits of their retirees because they simply couldn't afford to pay for them anymore. Virtually everyone pays "something" for their health insurance benefits, usually through weekly payroll withholdings; if someone is getting these benefits for free, then they are 1) very lucky, and 2) living on borrowed time, because this will probably not go on much longer, as retirees' medical expenses soar through the simple process of the aging of the beneficiaries.
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Old 09-25-2009, 12:11 PM
 
5,861 posts, read 14,079,042 times
Reputation: 3492
Quote:
Originally Posted by MassVt View Post
..if this might be a "luxury" that NYC can't afford for much longer; remember, if I recall correctly, that the Big 3 Automakers in Detroit had to cut back on the health insurance benefits of their retirees because they simply couldn't afford to pay for them anymore. Virtually everyone pays "something" for their health insurance benefits, usually through weekly payroll withholdings; if someone is getting these benefits for free, then they are 1) very lucky, and 2) living on borrowed time, because this will probably not go on much longer, as retirees' medical expenses soar through the simple process of the aging of the beneficiaries.
Well, I thought everyone had co-pays and deductables (of various amounts) these days, but let's see what Rachel says.

Imposing and gradually increasing co-pays and deductables are your employer's way of saying, "I can't afford this anymore...employees need to start paying for this." Gradually, the cost is being shifted to the employees. Luckily, most employers recognize the value of preventive care, so don't impose OOP costs on those, whcih would discourage many from getting physicals, etc.
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Old 09-25-2009, 02:29 PM
 
Location: Denver
6,628 posts, read 12,537,430 times
Reputation: 4059
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
The article's implicit arguement is that coverage should not be expanded to all citizens because there wouldn't be enough physicians to treat them is predictable from this conservative professional journal. Many doctors do not want to share their turf, when in actuality, nurse practitioners are growing in thier ranks and are able to pick up much of the health care services and procedures that are today relegated solely to MDs. Educating nurse praticitoners takes much less time and is much less expensive than educating MDs. Study after study has shown that the quality of the care provided by NPs is equal to that of MDs. In addition, the development of the "medical home" care model is also reducing the burden placed on primary care docs, while their patients get more quality time with them.
I noticed that too. I also noticed they chose a doctor out in Amherst, which is a very rural area in Western Massachusetts. I've never had any trouble seeing a doctor, and I'd be interested if they're facing the "overcrowding" problem in other places in and around Boston.
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Old 09-25-2009, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Concrete jungle where dreams are made of.
8,900 posts, read 13,277,319 times
Reputation: 1819
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Really free? No co-pays or deductables?

No...we get treated nicely here as teachers. Also only pay $5 for antibiotics.
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Old 09-25-2009, 04:13 PM
 
Location: MI
1,068 posts, read 2,864,723 times
Reputation: 577
I don't have it right now, and the last 5 or so years I was employed I declined it......too expensive, it didn't cover enough, and I hardly used it.
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Old 09-25-2009, 06:44 PM
 
672 posts, read 1,553,683 times
Reputation: 496
The US has this weird backward system where we get our healthcare through our employers. I can't think of any other system in the World that does it this way.

Insurers are taking 10-30% of the premiums that your employers pay on your behalf as pure profit and/or administrative waste as well. Average composite premiums are running as much as $1,000-1,500 per month per family these days.

Imagine getting rid of the insurance companies, paying a little bit more in taxes, but getting paid more in terms of wages in return. How's an extra $15-20 thousand dollars more in your pocket each year sound?

Much of the stagnation in wages we're seeing can be directly attributed to the increases in healtcare costs to your employer.

We need to end this cycle.
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Old 09-25-2009, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Wherever I want to be... ;)
2,539 posts, read 8,851,948 times
Reputation: 1958
We have major medical health, but no life or dental.
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Old 09-25-2009, 07:42 PM
 
Location: Sarasota, Florida
15,400 posts, read 19,612,290 times
Reputation: 11067
Quote:
Originally Posted by DailyJournalist View Post
CNN released a map of uninsured percentages by state. How did your state do? Congrats to MA for keeping so many insured.

State by state: Who’s got health insurance and who doesn’t - CNNMoney.com

Massachusetts boasts lowest rate of uninsured in 2008 - Sep. 21, 2009
Why am I not surprised by how "red" Florida is on the map for the percentage of uninsured???
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Old 09-26-2009, 12:50 PM
 
5,969 posts, read 7,768,529 times
Reputation: 1614
Quote:
Originally Posted by PITTSTON2SARASOTA View Post
Why am I not surprised by how "red" Florida is on the map for the percentage of uninsured???
Its a state dominated by low wage jobs with little to no benefits.
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Old 02-21-2010, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Kennett Square, PA
1,699 posts, read 2,616,515 times
Reputation: 2594
Yeah, I have health insurance: it just went up to 650.00 a month with LESS service coverage and TRIPLE the co-pays. i'm just THRILLED
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