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Old 07-22-2019, 07:33 AM
 
97 posts, read 32,900 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Other cities are what you'd consider to be true "river cities" but are located on relatively small river systems, so while the river helps to define the geography of the city, it resulted in their being a relatively small "hinterland" which was connected in the early days by riverine traffic. Hartford, Albany, Richmond, San Antonio, and Portland are all examples of this.
FYI Portland is located not only on the Willamette which divides the city into halves but also the Columbia which divides Oregon from Washington. While the Willamette has a small "hinterland" the Columbia has a massive drainage basin (most water flowing into the Pacific in the Western hemisphere) and the Bonneville Power Administration helped define the region and provide plentiful cheap electricity. It also enabled barge traffic down the Columbia from the Inland Empire (California does not have a monopoly on this term). Portland is still a major port both for river traffic and for oceangoing vessels.
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Old 07-22-2019, 07:40 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,494 posts, read 12,006,720 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pavlov's Dog View Post
FYI Portland is located not only on the Willamette which divides the city into halves but also the Columbia which divides Oregon from Washington. While the Willamette has a small "hinterland" the Columbia has a massive drainage basin (most water flowing into the Pacific in the Western hemisphere) and the Bonneville Power Administration helped define the region and provide plentiful cheap electricity. It also enabled barge traffic down the Columbia from the Inland Empire (California does not have a monopoly on this term). Portland is still a major port both for river traffic and for oceangoing vessels.
I know what you meant, and I considered that Portland might be a "half tier" larger. But there are no other major cities on the Columbia, meaning Portland basically has the river valley to itself.

In terms of potentially connecting urban areas, the Willamette is actually the more important river, because Salem/Albany/Corvallis/Eugene/Springfield beat out Kennewick/Richland/Pasco.
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Old 07-22-2019, 08:20 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheseGoTo11 View Post
Los Angeles - LA River, Phoenix - Salt River, Santa Fe - Rio Grande

The Rio Grande doesn't flow through any part of Santa Fe. It's a few miles to the west.
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Old 07-22-2019, 08:36 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Minneapolis and Saint Paul. Saint Paul feels more like a river city, though.



For towns, Stillwater is really charming.



New Orleans is a classic river city as well.
As charming as Stillwater is, it really should be moreso given it's history and location. Many of the business aren't thriving, and they have narrow hours. The food is always mediocre and the loud motorcycles annoying. I took friends shopping one time, and we hit up both Stillwater and Hudson, WI, and Hudson hands down had the better antique shopping in DT but you'd never know it the way Stillwater gets talked about.

Don't get me wrong, I still enjoy the town, we even spent our wedding night at a bed and breakfast there. But I'm constantly having to defend the town to out of town friends and relatives who remark "did I miss something, was that it?"
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Old 07-22-2019, 10:37 AM
 
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The Mississippi and Ohio Rivers are impressive (length, volume) but they are also pretty ugly and narrow.
Washington is a better river city than any city along those rivers. The Potomac is much prettier, 1000 times more accessible, has much greater variety and isnít junked up with a lot of commercial traffic (and the ugly infrastructure necessary to accommodate said traffic).

Just being able to look at a river isnít enough for me. I need to actually get into a cityís river (beaches, places to swim, rock hop, paddle...) to consider that a city has a relationship with the river.
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Old 07-22-2019, 10:51 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
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I think Chattanooga, TN has a beautiful river presence and emphasis.
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Old 07-22-2019, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
4,013 posts, read 2,255,179 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I know what you meant, and I considered that Portland might be a "half tier" larger. But there are no other major cities on the Columbia, meaning Portland basically has the river valley to itself.

In terms of potentially connecting urban areas, the Willamette is actually the more important river, because Salem/Albany/Corvallis/Eugene/Springfield beat out Kennewick/Richland/Pasco.
Considering that after 2011 the locks on the Willamette Falls are permanently closed and prevents any boat traffic going any further south of the Portland Metro area, I would argue that the Columbia is way more important, Also if we are going to include any city in the water basin, then Spokane and Boise need to be included as well.

List of metro areas in the Columbian river basin.

Portland, OR: 2,478,810
Boise, ID: 730,426
Spokane, WA: 573,493
Salem, OR: 432,102
Eugene, OR: 379,611
Kennewick, WA: 296,224
Yakima, WA: 251,446
Kelowna, BC: 194,882
Coeur d'Alene, ID: 161,505
Idaho Falls, ID: 148,904
Albany, OR: 127,335
Wenatchee, WA: 119,943
Missoula, MT: 118,791
Twin Falls, ID: 110,096
Long View, WA: 108,987
Moses Lake, WA: 97,331
Corvallis, OR: 92,101
Hermiston, OR: 88,888
Pocatello, ID: 87,138
Walla Walla, WA: 64,981
Lewiston, ID: 63,018
Vernon, BC: 61,334
Ontario, OR: 54,276
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Old 07-22-2019, 03:03 PM
 
9,420 posts, read 9,600,473 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spencer114 View Post
The Mississippi and Ohio Rivers are impressive (length, volume) but they are also pretty ugly and narrow.
Washington is a better river city than any city along those rivers. The Potomac is much prettier, 1000 times more accessible, has much greater variety and isn’t junked up with a lot of commercial traffic (and the ugly infrastructure necessary to accommodate said traffic).

Just being able to look at a river isn’t enough for me. I need to actually get into a city’s river (beaches, places to swim, rock hop, paddle...) to consider that a city has a relationship with the river.
The River is pretty and accessible because it’s window dressing. It’s irrelevent the growth/development of Washington DC. New Orleans exists as a city because of the Riverport. So obviously there is more industry on the water front.


Pretty much the less fun a waterfront is the more economically important it is to the city. Endless parkland along a river pretty much is a sign it isn’t a River City.
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Old 07-22-2019, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Willowbrook, Houston
767 posts, read 654,401 times
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Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, New Orleans, Memphis, St. Louis, Philadelphia, Boston are some of my favorite river cities.
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Old 07-22-2019, 06:32 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
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St. Louis is my favorite— I was born there. It has always had a river focus and a river culture. The Mississippi and Missouri are real pulsing rivers — beautiful and sometimes deadly with an amazing history and folklore. Think of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn and the mystique of the river as a living thing. In my late 20s I moved to a small town upstream on the Missouri River and lived there for 35 years. A friend was part of the keelboat crew of the reenacted Lewis and Clark Expedition in 2004 that went up the Missouri River. These rivers are so big and powerful that there is a great deal of respect and sometimes even fear of going into the river. That was still a major undertaking 200 years after the first trip. There isn’t a sense that they are recreational venues, although some will take a boat out especially where the river is impounded like at Alton. As a kid we would sneak over to an island on the Missouri River on a rock causeway built by the Corps of Engineers. It was a primeval place with trees ten feet around with flood-deposited driftwood piled up ten or twelve feet against the trunks. It was alive with snakes and foxes and just about everything else. As big as these rivers are, they grow even more when the Ohio/Tennessee and Arkansas rivers pour into the main channel and head toward New Orleans (my 2nd favorite city) and the Gulf.
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