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Old 05-06-2007, 05:10 AM
 
Location: VA
786 posts, read 4,319,743 times
Reputation: 1107

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I am from Minnesota originally and there are many stories in the local media about Black and Asian professionals being unset that there are not more people like them in Minneapolis. In fact, many Blacks are leaving the Twin Cities because they feel there is not enough of "their people" in the area, and this effects their chosen lifestyle. They want more Blacks to move into MN so there will be more Black Churches, Black Music, Black Food, Black nightclubs, etc.

http://www.startribune.com/535/story/1152159.html (broken link)

The small Asian Community in the Twin Cities is also saying the same thing and many of them are moving out and going to San Francisco and Seattle, places with a larger Asian population.

As Whites become a minority in Cities all over America, can they say with out being Politically incorrect, " I want to move to a city with more White people so I can experience more White music, White Churches, White Food and White Nightclubs?"
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Old 05-06-2007, 09:20 PM
 
47 posts, read 36,552 times
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Judging by the lack of response to this post, it would seem there aren’t many racial minorities here. Anyway, I’ll post my own and it is- Yes, I would prefer to live in a place where I don’t feel like I’m the “only one” of very few, like where I am now, or the environment where I grew up. But I was willing to trade that for the opportunity to do work that interests me and pays well, for a company I respect.

Just to relate-- I’ve been reading some of City-Data’s message boards, and found many of the complaints/realizations voiced by “the transplant” hint at my own experience as a minority (politics, language and historical injustices aside). You move somewhere, where you have no friends or family, and now you are transplant who feels:
- you are being judged from all angles and need to prove yourself to everyone else before you will be accepted, and even then there will likely be a distance; or else simply having stereotypes attributed to you and leaving it at that
- a weird connection with a total stranger who is from your home state or part of the country, someone who you would have never even spoken to if you had actually met in your hometown
- a newly found appreciation for everything you took for granted in your former home, and even wanting to learn more about it after you have moved
- pride as you recall your hometown hero
- anger or defeat facing complaints or hatred from locals wanting you all to go back to your hometown, where you belong

I am not an immigrant, but I’ve often found myself viewed as one ever since I was little. It has in turn prompted my interest in my roots and also those of others, giving me a new and different perspective than what I would have had if I were automatically accepted as a normal, “just like the rest of us” member of the majority. Some people like places with more transplants; similarly, I would prefer to live in a diverse area.
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Old 05-06-2007, 09:24 PM
 
47 posts, read 36,552 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dingler View Post
As Whites become a minority in Cities all over America, can they say with out being Politically incorrect, " I want to move to a city with more White people so I can experience more White music, White Churches, White Food and White Nightclubs?"
Do you mean "White flight"?
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Old 05-06-2007, 10:41 PM
 
942 posts, read 1,066,738 times
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it works both ways, some areas that were more white people are no longer that way. My town Gresham Oregon a suburb of Portland, is I believe the paper said 60% hispanic, and a smaller percentage Russian immigrants. I do feel like a complete stranger here, even more so since I am not from here, and have not lived here very long. I will be leaving because there is no real friendliness or neighborhood feel to this community because of this imbalance in the population. We all need a community of like minded people, there is noting politically incorrect in that, or we would be having a very lonely life. So there is white flight out of Gresham Oregon
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Old 05-06-2007, 10:56 PM
 
4,270 posts, read 13,970,430 times
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When we lived in upstate NY, my husband said this potential employee didn't take the job b'c he couldn't find any products for his hair (African American). I can see how that affects a person's decision to live somewhere. Maybe that sounds trite to you but it may be an important factor for some people.

I loved living in upstate NY but the problem was there wasn't enough authentic Chinese restuarants and the Chinese grocery markets were really small. I grew up on Chinese food so yeah, it's important to me to be near Asian markets. Maybe if Wal-mart had several aisles dedicated to Asian foods, I wouldn't be so picky about where I lived but then non-Asians I'm sure will make a big issue about that. "Our American aisles our being over run by Chinese grocery items! Can't they just assimilate?!" Sorry, that was a little sarcasm.

I think generally speaking, people just like to be around people that look like them and there's nothing wrong with that. I personally like to live in a diverse area b'c I'm interested in all sorts of people and I love to learn about other cultures and customs. It is nice though to have the "comforts of your culture" so I'm glad that there's a larger Asian market where I live now ... and better, more authentic, Chinese food restuarants.
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Old 05-07-2007, 10:20 AM
 
942 posts, read 1,066,738 times
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There is nothing worse than living in a area, and being different than the majority of people. Anyone that thinks that is discriminatory, is actually being reverse discriminatory. Its one thing to live in diverse areas, its an entirely different matter when there are one or two cultures that are dominant, and the person that is of neither is completely left out. We have way too much of this type of demographics now in this country, and it is forcing people to move, or be a part of nothing.
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Old 05-07-2007, 11:59 AM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,048,152 times
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Dingler, you posted this in two forums, and I responded to the one you posted in the MN forum (which has now been moved).

Anyway, I'm going to copy my response here. I think this forum is the more appropriate place for this discussion, as it's not just a MN thing.

Originally Posted by PghPaNative: "If they did move for that reason, would this make them racist? I don't think so, people generally like to be around things that are commonplace to them....why it should offend is beyond me...goes the same if it were Asians or Whites or purple people....people just prefer in general to be with others who they share something in common with.

And on that same note here, some rather do something totally different, to each his or her own"

Posted by Ben Around: Exactly! It's cultural, not racial. There are tons of black faces in the Twin Cities. The issue is, there are few black professionals. The average black person here in Mpls/St Paul cannot support the kinds of institutions, services, cultural activities, etc. that a black professional might long for. There's certainly a critical mass of blacks, but not a critical mass of black professionals.
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Old 05-07-2007, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
30,191 posts, read 67,339,144 times
Reputation: 15830
I know we're not a "race" of people, but I wish there were more gays/lesbians in Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. I haven't had a date in nearly three years, and I'm tired of serenading my turtle. (Sniffle, sniffle).
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Old 05-07-2007, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Bay Area, CA
29,041 posts, read 45,025,391 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScrantonWilkesBarre View Post
I know we're not a "race" of people, but I wish there were more gays/lesbians in Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. I haven't had a date in nearly three years, and I'm tired of serenading my turtle. (Sniffle, sniffle).
Aw, poor Scranton... come out here to SF, and I can find you PLENTY of dates!

As for the original question, I totally understand wanting to be around "your own kind". I used to live in an area without any Jewish community to speak of, and it got a bit lonely - not to mention, it's awfully hard to find a Synagogue, Jewish food items, decorations for our holidays, etc. So it's not just about who else lives there, but also what they offer to the community.
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Old 05-23-2007, 11:24 PM
 
Location: Alberta
110 posts, read 544,641 times
Reputation: 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by filmfan View Post
- a weird connection with a total stranger who is from your home state or part of the country, someone who you would have never even spoken to if you had actually met in your hometown
- a newly found appreciation for everything you took for granted in your former home, and even wanting to learn more about it after you have moved

I like your list, although i haven't moved yet, I can definetly relate to how I would feel if I were to move.

I am a minority and would prefer there to be atleast some people who are the same race as me. 10% is probably decent. 15-20% would probably be even better.
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