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Old 11-13-2009, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,674,548 times
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Another popular thing is Texas "Get yo paper!". People use this when people are fighting lol
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Old 11-13-2009, 05:06 PM
 
Location: Dayton, OH/Portland, OR
398 posts, read 1,162,683 times
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I was reminded of another one here in SW Ohio today:

Dayton: Meemaw
Everywhere else I've ever lived: Grandma or Grandmother

Dayton: Pappaw
Everywhere else I've ever lived: Grandpa or Grandfather

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Old 11-13-2009, 07:47 PM
 
1,247 posts, read 3,429,738 times
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^Those phrases come from Dayton's Appalacia immigrants' roots.
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Old 11-13-2009, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Hell's Kitchen, NYC
2,271 posts, read 4,529,520 times
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New England/Boston: "All set"

Drives me nuts to this day.
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Old 11-13-2009, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Dayton, OH/Portland, OR
398 posts, read 1,162,683 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daytonnatian View Post
^Those phrases come from Dayton's Appalacia immigrants' roots.
oooooh - that reminds me - can you tell me, Daytonnatian if it's supposed to be pronounced "app-uh-LATCHA-uh" or "app-uh-LAY-shuh"? I have always said the latter, but around here I always hear "app-uh-LATCH-uh" and I'm thinking I've probably said it wrong all my life! I'm thinking since we have all the Appalacian immigrants around here, it's probably pronounced correctly around here too!
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Old 11-13-2009, 08:07 PM
 
1,247 posts, read 3,429,738 times
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^I personally say it like: "app-uh-LAY-shuh"

Many of the people I work with at a local tool and die shop say it like: "app-uh-LATCHA-uh"

I kinda think that native Ohioans and other outsiders say it the second way you posted, and those south of the Ohio say it the first way.
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Old 11-13-2009, 09:19 PM
 
7,595 posts, read 9,448,275 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theSUBlime View Post
New England/Boston: "All set"

Drives me nuts to this day.
I'm not sure why; when a waitress asks me if I want anything else, I usually respond, "No thanks, I'm all set"...seems like a rather ordinary thing to say..
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Old 11-13-2009, 09:49 PM
 
Location: Mequon, WI
7,835 posts, read 19,567,727 times
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As far as the Midwest, in all my travels I have never heard anyone outside Milwaukee-Chicago say "lookit" as used in a way to say understand or you know what I am saying.
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Old 11-14-2009, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Dayton, OH/Portland, OR
398 posts, read 1,162,683 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MassVt View Post
I'm not sure why; when a waitress asks me if I want anything else, I usually respond, "No thanks, I'm all set"...seems like a rather ordinary thing to say..
I think that is a very normal thing to say as well. I personally would say "No thanks, I'm good". That would come naturally to me, being from the PNW. But here in the Midwest I do hear "all set" all of the time. And even heard it back in Oregon sometimes too.
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Old 11-14-2009, 12:09 PM
 
Location: In my view finder.....
8,521 posts, read 13,985,405 times
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"Bob's your uncle"


When I first heard this, I actually thought the guy was telling me that Bob was my uncle, than I heard it again.

I did some research and found out it means "and there you have it". Often times used after giving simple directions or instructions. It's mainly used by Brits.

Example: "To make a ham sandwich, simply put a piece of ham between two slices of buttered bread, and Bob's your uncle."
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