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Old 10-14-2009, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
5,847 posts, read 11,045,800 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ian07 View Post
This is a chicano-english dialect.
Yep.

I wouldn't call it an accent, but many white affluent southern-california girls have a vocal affliction where they drop the tone of their voice and/or pronounce a subtle hard consonant (when it should be soft) at the end of their sentences.

but this is not valley speak.
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Old 10-14-2009, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia,New Jersey, NYC!
6,967 posts, read 18,239,834 times
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they do have a distinct accent, although, i can't put a finger on what it is exactly
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Old 10-14-2009, 02:26 PM
 
55 posts, read 139,451 times
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Everyone with a voice has some kind of an accent.
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Old 10-14-2009, 02:29 PM
 
Location: Long Island/NYC
11,334 posts, read 17,140,248 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by john_starks View Post
they do have a distinct accent, although, i can't put a finger on what it is exactly
Me either, its so weird that I can't really figure it out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kcee510 View Post
I am majoring in Communication Studies in college and many of my professors train people how to speak in public and they claim it is always better if you over pronounce. Your audience has a better chance of understanding you.

I live in California and I don't think I have ever heard someone call the Park P-O-R-K or Mark M-O-R-K In California we have the Cot-Caught merger. The sound change causes the vowel in Caught, Talk, and small to be pronounced like the vowel in cot, rock, and doll. However the change does not affect a vowel followed by r. So in California you would never hear a person call a Park P-O-R-K, it would be pronounced correctly. For example Barn and Born remain distinct out here in California. Park and Mark are bad examples because we actually do not change the vowel in those instances.
I was referring to the Californians I knew, I've heard other people in California talk like that as well, I know its probably not representative of the whole state though (the same way the "non-pronunciation" of R's isn't representative of the whole Northeast) as I've seen Californians speak very proper with only a hint of an accent. I'll try to find an example of the P-O-R-K type thing.
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Old 10-14-2009, 04:49 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,244 posts, read 24,491,477 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Ahhhh, thank you! I hear this accent from time to time but never figured out where it came from. Windshield = windshill, sale = sell, e-mail = e-mell, etc...
I would think it's safe to say that this accent covers not just Utah, but a good portion of the Great Basin, the Mojave Desert and parts of Colorado.
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Old 10-14-2009, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,244 posts, read 24,491,477 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Infamous92 View Post
Ha, we under-pronounce and y'all over-pronounce. You act like everyone in Massachusetts talks like Peter Griffin.

Lol @ P-A-R-K getting changed to P-A-H-K, most Californians I know would say P-O-R-K. M-A-R-K would be M-O-R-K, etc. so don't even try it.

So don't try and front on us when a lot of y'all are just as bad lol.

I like Californian accents except that Valley Girl nonsense lol.
I've never heard "pork" or "mork" either.
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Old 10-14-2009, 05:16 PM
 
Location: where my heart is
5,642 posts, read 7,991,153 times
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Default I cannot either

Quote:
Originally Posted by john_starks View Post
they do have a distinct accent, although, i can't put a finger on what it is exactly
except that they have a certain twang and draw out their words. I worked with two people who were from the LA area last year.
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Old 10-14-2009, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Chicago
38,690 posts, read 89,347,563 times
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Lots of coastal Californians have what I call the "surf-drawl" accent epitomized by Sean Penn in Fast Times at Ridgemont High, though his is obviously a highly exaggerated version of it. Of course it's thicker in SoCal but I've even detected it in a few Bay Area residents.

I think I've only met one inland Californian and honestly she just kinda sounded like a hick.
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Old 10-14-2009, 08:28 PM
 
5,861 posts, read 14,075,455 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post
I've never heard "pork" or "mork" either.
I know what he means. In contrast with the way many easterners and upper midwesterners come down hard on the Rs (parrrk, marrrk), park and mark do sound a bit like pork and mork. Not sure which ones have the accent--both, I guess!
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Old 10-14-2009, 08:32 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington
2,317 posts, read 6,898,838 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
Lots of coastal Californians have what I call the "surf-drawl" accent epitomized by Sean Penn in Fast Times at Ridgemont High, though his is obviously a highly exaggerated version of it. Of course it's thicker in SoCal but I've even detected it in a few Bay Area residents.

I think I've only met one inland Californian and honestly she just kinda sounded like a hick.
The inland California accent is pretty hick. I had a co-worker and a good friend who are both from the Sacramento area and they drop all the g's off their present participles i.e. goin' instead of going, among other things.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
Anyway as Wikipedia is used some here

California English - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

What it says of vowels sort-of fits what I was thinking, but was maybe not able to express. Also it seemed to indicate a "Californian accent(s)" is perhaps somewhat recent. The few Californians I've dealt with were college students.
Not necessarily a new thing. I've met middle aged folks in their 40s with the stereotypical Californian vowel sounds and it's really surprising and funny, because you don't expect it from someone that "old."

Conversely, I have met young people from Boston and New York City without any perceptible 'accent' that was markedly different than my own Northwestern accent.
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