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Old 10-15-2009, 09:50 AM
 
141 posts, read 416,258 times
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What will be the max population of your city.
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Old 10-15-2009, 10:38 AM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,129,272 times
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What it is now. Downhill from here.
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Old 10-15-2009, 10:43 AM
 
Location: moving again
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Hopefully right now is the max for my city. Have not in anyway enjoyed the explosion of growth my town has had in the least bit. Brought zero good and permanently scared a once beautiful landscape
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Old 10-15-2009, 10:50 AM
 
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If the question is how much more population can a city attain, you really have to break it down into two types of cities. There are many large US cities that have maxed out their land area, and can only grow upward and with more density. Other more spread out cities still have plenty of available land, or the ability to change zoning quite easily. Using this as an assumption, my best guesses for large increases in population would be for the first type of city, New York, San Francisco, Seattle, Chicago, Los Angeles, Boston, maybe even DC. For the second type of city, the guesses are easier: Phoenix, Dallas, Houston, Atlanta, Orlando, maybe Charlotte, Oklahoma City, and I'm probably leaving out some other obvious ones.
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Old 10-15-2009, 11:05 AM
 
Location: a swanky suburb in my fancy pants
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Somthing else to consider.....as my city continues to grow upwards, it looses population because large family households are replaced by one and two person households.
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Old 10-15-2009, 04:28 PM
 
Location: Greater PDX
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1 million. Anyone over that number, they shoot.
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Old 10-15-2009, 04:35 PM
 
Location: Long Island/NYC
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IDK, New York City is expected to grow to about 9.2-9.5 million people by 2030.

I don't see Manhattan's population growing significantly as most of it is already built up (unless they demolish brownstones and build more high-rises).

The other boroughs especially Staten Island & Queens may see significant population increases.

I'll be out of here way before this happens, I wouldn't want to live in an "apartment-city" anyways.
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Old 10-15-2009, 05:38 PM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,265,202 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pw72 View Post
If the question is how much more population can a city attain, you really have to break it down into two types of cities. There are many large US cities that have maxed out their land area, and can only grow upward and with more density. Other more spread out cities still have plenty of available land, or the ability to change zoning quite easily. Using this as an assumption, my best guesses for large increases in population would be for the first type of city, New York, San Francisco, Seattle, Chicago, Los Angeles, Boston, maybe even DC. For the second type of city, the guesses are easier: Phoenix, Dallas, Houston, Atlanta, Orlando, maybe Charlotte, Oklahoma City, and I'm probably leaving out some other obvious ones.
The city limits of Atlanta are not much larger than that of Seattle...and the populations are very nearly the same. Why is it that Seattle only has room to grow up with more density but Atlanta is categorized as "spread out"? I think you are assuming that all southern cities are just alike, when they aren't at all. Orlando is about the same size as Seattle as well, but with a considerably smaller population.

Houston, Phoenix, and OKC are all very large in area (500+ square miles)
Dallas and Charlotte are about half the size of Houston (+-300 square miles)
Atlanta and Orlando are about 1/3 the size of Dallas (+-100 square miles) - Seattle is 84 square miles.
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Old 10-15-2009, 05:55 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit Area, Michigan
1,107 posts, read 2,706,810 times
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Detroit is shrinking. But Detroit sure has the room for growth if it decides to get its act together.
http://cartophilia.com/blog/images2009/detroitsrhinking.jpg (broken link)
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Old 10-15-2009, 07:13 PM
 
3,970 posts, read 11,825,661 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
The city limits of Atlanta are not much larger than that of Seattle...and the populations are very nearly the same. Why is it that Seattle only has room to grow up with more density but Atlanta is categorized as "spread out"? I think you are assuming that all southern cities are just alike, when they aren't at all. Orlando is about the same size as Seattle as well, but with a considerably smaller population.

Houston, Phoenix, and OKC are all very large in area (500+ square miles)
Dallas and Charlotte are about half the size of Houston (+-300 square miles)
Atlanta and Orlando are about 1/3 the size of Dallas (+-100 square miles) - Seattle is 84 square miles.
That's fair. My visits to Atlanta have been infrequent, but my impression was there was still a lot of open land, but not being extremely familiar with the city limits, thank you for the correction.
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