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Old 10-30-2009, 03:31 PM
 
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Texans are proud and cherish manners, like Southerners, but we have our own thing. We are also more friendly, independent, oustpoken, libertarian and maverick with a wild party streak!
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Old 10-30-2009, 03:33 PM
 
Location: Houston
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
It changed drastically for the entire South around 1860 with the Civil War...not just for Texas.
Texas hadn't been a state very long in the 1860's. It had and has been associated with several different regions other than the South. I don't think it was ever associated with the Deep South, but I could be wrong. I wasn't alive in the 1800's.

But I do know that no one in Texas or the Deep South state's I've talked to consider Texas a part of the Deep South. You are the only one I've heard make that argument.
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Old 10-30-2009, 03:35 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wpmeads View Post
Texas hadn't been a state very long in the 1860's. It had and has been associated with several different regions other than the South. I don't think it was ever associated with the Deep South, but I could be wrong. I wasn't alive in the 1800's.

But I do know that no one in Texas or the Deep South state's I've talked to consider Texas a part of the Deep South. You are the only one I've heard make that argument.
The Deep South is no longer a cohesive area...the reason it was in the past was due to it's plantation culture, and Texas was included in that culture. Look it up - I'm not the only one who is familiar with history.

Historic Deep South
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/a/a6/US_map-Deep_South_States.png/300px-US_map-Deep_South_States.png (broken link)
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Old 10-30-2009, 03:45 PM
 
Location: Houston
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
The Deep South is no longer a cohesive area...the reason it was in the past was due to it's plantation culture, and Texas was included in that culture. Look it up - I'm not the only one who is familiar with history.

Historic Deep South
If that's true, my guess would be Texas hasn't been a Deep South state sense the 1870's. In today's terms, it refers to Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia, and South Carolina (the states in dark maroon). I've heard people refer to the region as the Deep South in those states and out of those states. In modern times, it's just a term to describe a handful of states with cultural similarities that Texas is NOT included in. That doesn't mean their the same, just similar.
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Old 10-30-2009, 03:47 PM
 
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Texas is such a huge state both geographically and in population that it's hard to really come up with a stereotypical Texan. I guess you could say the same about the south as a whole.

I do kind of envy the Texas pride thing. Sadly "southern" pride tends to be accompanied with confederate flags and reactionism. Texas seems more individualistic; more libertarian as a previous poster mentioned. Some are arrogant. I think these people are the south's version of the arrogant New Yorker. Regardless, I have met some of the nicest, most gracious people in both places.

I don't think I've met any Texan who looked down on people who weren't from there.
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Old 10-30-2009, 04:18 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wpmeads View Post
If that's true, my guess would be Texas hasn't been a Deep South state sense the 1870's. In today's terms, it refers to Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia, and South Carolina (the states in dark maroon). I've heard people refer to the region as the Deep South in those states and out of those states. In modern times, it's just a term to describe a handful of states with cultural similarities that Texas is NOT included in. That doesn't mean their the same, just similar.
No, it's used by people to disparage that area...that's why you don't want Texas to be associated with it. If it was a complimentary term, Texas would be all up in being a part of it.
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Old 10-30-2009, 04:43 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,712,804 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
No, it's used by people to disparage that area...that's why you don't want Texas to be associated with it. If it was a complimentary term, Texas would be all up in being a part of it.
No, its the just that Texas really has never been known as deep south. Yes the map clearly points it out, but that was mostly due to the eastern parts of Texas. Texans aren't embarrassed or ashamed of their southern heritage, but to group it with places like MS,AL,GA,LA,TN,etc is incorrect.

This isn't about superiority; its about that fact that you continuously ignore the western influence that separates Texas from truly being a southern state. If you want to talk just about East Texas; than sure, but Texas as a whole can't really be called southern or even western. Only parts can.

Last edited by blkgiraffe; 10-30-2009 at 04:55 PM..
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Old 10-30-2009, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Houston
2,026 posts, read 3,679,030 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
No, its the just that Texas really has never been as as deep south. Yes the map clearly points it out, but that was mostly due to the eastern parts of Texas. Texans aren't embarrassed or ashamed of their southern heritage, but to group it with places like MS,AL,GA,LA,TN,etc is incorrect.

This isn't about superiority; its about that fact that you continuously ignore the western influence that separates Texas from truly being a southern state. If you want to talk just about East Texas; than sure, but Texas as a whole can't really be called southern or even western. Only parts can.
What he said.

Whether the term is used as a derogatory term or a sense of southern pride, it does not include Texas. That's just the way it is.
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Old 10-30-2009, 04:49 PM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,287,653 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wpmeads View Post
What he said.

Whether the term is used as a derogatory term or a sense of southern pride, it does not include Texas. That's just the way it is.
Check the map...and the history...and you'll find out differently. This isn't simply an opinion thing - it's historical fact.

Anyway, the thread isn't about whether Texas is part of some historical, outdated regional reference area. It's about something much more ridiculous...the "mentality" of the entire state vs. the "mentality" of the entire South. There is no way either place has a overall general mentality.
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Old 10-30-2009, 04:52 PM
 
737 posts, read 1,041,392 times
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Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
"Rust Belt" isn't an official region of the U.S. - Northeast and West ARE regions of the U.S. On that same note, "Deep South" isn't a region of the U.S.

"Sun Belt", "Bible Belt", "Rust Belt", "Deep South" are terms used to lump a large area of the U.S. together by some unflattering (and questionable) characteristics. If this weren't true, why would people from Texas argue so vehemently that they aren't part of it?
By unflattering characteristics? Like what? Take the "rust belt", how is it "unflattering" for it to be where auto manufacturing and the steel industry were much more prevalent than other parts of the country?

How is the "sun belt" used in an unflattering manner? Because it is has more mild winters and longer summers?

I would argue as vehemently that Iowa is not part of the rust belt and that Kansas isn't part of the sun belt. So the point you're trying to make isn't true.
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