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Old 10-21-2014, 05:24 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wpmeads View Post
Yeah Oklahomans say the same thing. I wouldn't live in either Oklahoma or Louisiana personally. I have family in both states so I know the places well enough to know they are not for me.
This is what I find amusing and different about Texans. There are a lot of them who feel that they are too good, or sophisticated, or whatever to live in surrounding states. Generally you don't hear a person from Mississippi say "Oh, I'd never live in Louisiana, it's not for me." I have lived in Texas on three different occasions and like it very much and appreciate what it has to offer but I could live in Arkansas, Mississippi or any other place and appreciate it for they offer. This is very difficulty for a typical Texan to do. They spend a lot of time coming up with reasons that Texas is better.

I think it was 2005 I was watching the Texas Longhorns play against Ohio State in Columbus. As they panned the crowd there was a sign in the Texas section that said, "Austin is better than Columbus." I thought it was funny because only Texans would do something like that.
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Old 10-22-2014, 08:20 AM
 
Location: USA
8,016 posts, read 9,498,853 times
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Texans are way cockier I guess.
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Old 10-23-2014, 06:18 AM
 
2,084 posts, read 1,596,496 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by homeinatx View Post
The difference for me is that Texas's ties to Mexico are not just historical or residual. They are historical and living and ongoing and increasing. It is not like France forms the largest border of Louisiana, and thousands of French people move back and forth from France to Louisiana, and have done so for the last 150 years. Drive through any big city in Texas and you are going to see plenty Mexican license plates. Mexico is Texas's biggest trading partner and has been for a long time. There is a long and mostly uninterrupted shared history between Texas and Mexico like there is nowhere in the South. And it is a Mexican influence, not so much a latin influence and a northern Mexico influence at that. The impact of Mexican American culture on the state culture of Texas is way bigger than anywhere else, except perhaps for California and the impact is of a longer duration in Texas. Nearly all the great Mexican-American literature of the early part of the twentieth century comes from south Texas, plus Tex-Mex food, Tejano music etc. San Antonio has been a center for Mariachi bands since the 1920s. There are 11 Mexican consulates in Texas, the highest number for any state in the U.S. Texas's relationship with Mexico cannot really be characterized as one of "prior allegiances."

Texas is a huge and demographically, culturally and topographically diverse state with many influences. Anywhere behind the Pine curtain - Rural and small town/city East Texas as well as the golden triangle area in southeast Texas - is easily and correctly characterized as southern. However, all the big cities are over a third Latino, overwhelmingly of Mexican heritage: San Antonio over 60%, El Paso 80%, Houston 45%, Dallas 43%, Austin 42%, Fort Worth 37%. The State as a whole is close to 40% Latino/Hispanic, and I suspect that these numbers are actually a little low given the difficulties census data has with Latino populations.

While I think there are other factors that distinguish a Texas mentality from a Southern one- however such nebulous terms can be defined, Texas is absolutely NOT demographically a Southern state. Texas is one of 4 majority minority states in the US, along with CA, NM and HI. While the Latino population is growing quickly all over the U.S., no (other) Southern state is likely to see these kind of numbers in my lifetime and even if one did, it would not have the long history and character of Texas as a border state. Texas might have been more of a southern state at certain moments in its history, but right now I think it is Texas's southernness that presents as "prior allegiances" and "residual cultures."
Im curious, I wonder you would choose to quote the words "prior allegiances" and "residual cultures" in this instance...as if the plausibility of either of those phrases are in question?....its allegiances to mexico, france, etc were PRIOR allegiances...surely you dont think Texas is still aligned with either of these countries today..?..?

and because those allegiances are, YES, prior, the cultures associated with them ARE residual...Even the Mexican culture here doesnt dominate the state, nor does it often shape the states' political stance.
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Old 10-23-2014, 06:58 AM
 
1,342 posts, read 2,166,656 times
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Originally Posted by soletaire View Post
Im curious, I wonder you would choose to quote the words "prior allegiances" and "residual cultures" in this instance...as if the plausibility of either of those phrases are in question?....its allegiances to mexico, france, etc were PRIOR allegiances...surely you dont think Texas is still aligned with either of these countries today..?..?

and because those allegiances are, YES, prior, the cultures associated with them ARE residual...Even the Mexican culture here doesnt dominate the state, nor does it often shape the states' political stance.
To imply that the influence of France and Mexico on Texas are somehow equivalent is disingenuous at best, risible at worst. There are some bits of residual Spanish and Mexican culture in Texas evident in place-names and some architecture, but Mexican culture is not just residual in the state of Texas because the number of Mexican immigrants grew consistently over the course of the twentieth century, the number of Spanish-speaking radio stations is growing etc? There is residual German culture in the Texas hill country and in the style of Central Texas BBQ. I don't experience residual French Culture anywhere . . . ?? And certainly not growing French or German culture in Texas.

I never claimed Mexican culture is dominant, but it is as important as southern culture in constituting the unique mix that is Texas, and I am talking culture here not politics.
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Old 10-23-2014, 06:59 AM
 
Location: South Austin, 78745
2,996 posts, read 2,153,649 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wpmeads View Post
You would be surprised how many people friends have told me stories about how someone from out of state asked them if Texans still rode horses everywhere.
Anybody who seriously asks if "Texans still rode horses everywhere" must be extremely isolated, or really gullible to stereotypes. Their question says more about them than it says about Texas or Texans.
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Old 10-23-2014, 11:38 AM
 
2,084 posts, read 1,596,496 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by homeinatx View Post
To imply that the influence of France and Mexico on Texas are somehow equivalent is disingenuous at best, risible at worst. There are some bits of residual Spanish and Mexican culture in Texas evident in place-names and some architecture, but Mexican culture is not just residual in the state of Texas because the number of Mexican immigrants grew consistently over the course of the twentieth century, the number of Spanish-speaking radio stations is growing etc? There is residual German culture in the Texas hill country and in the style of Central Texas BBQ. I don't experience residual French Culture anywhere . . . ?? And certainly not growing French or German culture in Texas.

I never claimed Mexican culture is dominant, but it is as important as southern culture in constituting the unique mix that is Texas, and I am talking culture here not politics.
Hmmm...and I never claimed that french and mexican cultures are equally influential in texas, so where were you going with this? And are politics not usually shaped by culture? I would say they often are...just not by a distinctly mexican culture in Texas.

Last edited by soletaire; 10-23-2014 at 11:51 AM..
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Old 10-23-2014, 03:15 PM
JJG
 
Location: Fort Worth
13,249 posts, read 19,200,442 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by machiavelli1 View Post


I have seen very few cowboy hats while driving around here as well.
All the REAL cowboys are nowhere near any major cities.

Usually when you see someone wearing a cowboy hat in town, they're typically just a poser, or visitor who think's "it's the thing to do" when you get to Texas, doing it for a special event like the rodeo, or a stereotypical rich Texan.
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