U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 10-27-2009, 10:11 PM
 
Location: The land of sugar... previously Houston and Austin
5,429 posts, read 13,175,496 times
Reputation: 3642

Advertisements

Interesting article and map.

Census: 'Brain gains' for high-tech cities - Yahoo! News (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20091028/ap_on_go_ot/us_census_smart_cities - broken link)
"The data covering 2006-2008 show that Austin, Texas, Portland, Ore., Charlotte and Raleigh, both in North Carolina, and Seattle saw large jumps in residents with at least a college degree. San Francisco, with its burgeoning biotech industry, and Houston, home to NASA and several medical centers, saw significant increases in residents with advanced-level graduate degrees."
More at the link...

Close-up of the map
Net migration among population 25 years and over who moved from ... - Yahoo! News Photos
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-28-2009, 02:20 PM
 
634 posts, read 1,266,507 times
Reputation: 712
Unfortunately, having a college degree is not always indicative of one's success or usefulness. I think I saw last night on The Colbert Report (he's one of my many TV boyfriends) that Harvard is attributed with having produced the most billionaires, but that quite a few university dropouts were also billionaires! It was a fun little segment.

It's good to have an educated population, but it certainly does make competition for positions all the more fierce. Scary thought in these times.

Great links! Thanks so much for sharing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-28-2009, 03:04 PM
 
Location: New York City
4,036 posts, read 8,938,981 times
Reputation: 3703
This is a strange map that has very little to do with the data discussed in the article.

Note: "Net migration among population 25 years and over who moved from different counties within the same state, bachelor’s degree or higher, by major metropolitan area."

Yet the article seems to be talking about migration across state lines. It makes no sense to display this map with this article. Of course new graduates from outstate Arizona will likely move to Phoenix (if they remain in state).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top