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Old 11-01-2009, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Houston
2,026 posts, read 3,674,141 times
Reputation: 466

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
Iowa floods nowhere as much as Houston. Flooding is pretty much a normal thing in Houston. Whenever it rains; my apartment parking lot gets pretty flooded.
Houston gets and average of 60 inches of rain a year. I'm not sure you can say the same for Iowa. It can flood anytime of the year here, not just during hurricane season.
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Old 11-01-2009, 10:12 AM
 
778 posts, read 1,459,657 times
Reputation: 442
Quote:
Originally Posted by city_data91 View Post
Maybe Southerners aren't as arrogant so they don't feel the need to brag, even though handling the heat makes someone equally as tough as handling the cold.
Most folks working outside for a living down here tend to burn out quicker so you'll notice many more younger Mexicans '.. doing those jobs American's don't want to do..' to paraphrase our former president. ..The relentless heat, humidity and hot sun wears you down. I really feel more for those guys doing landscaping,road work and roof work in the long hot months. Optimal temps are those you'll find in coastal CA.. In the winter up north little work is done outside except when you get that snow storm and even then it is temporary. There is a reason Minneapolis has two seasons..winter and road construction...
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Old 11-01-2009, 11:49 PM
 
195 posts, read 559,403 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by city_data91 View Post
You would be delusional if you were to believe Chicago summers are comparable to Southern summers. Yes, Chicago gets the occasional heat wave. But Chicago summers are nothing like Southern summers on average. If you think the occasional heat wave means you get both in Chicago, then that would mean the occasional cold snap means the South gets both.
Who said occasional?

Like I said, in RECENT history, weather has been a little milder with winters not being as cold and snowy and summers not being as hot, but that's only recent history.


When has the wind chill factor ever hit -30 in Atlanta? I don't consider 40 degrees a "cold snap". That's November weather.

Like I said,

With heat indexes of over 100 degrees

and wind chill factors of below zero, that is a more extreme swing in climate than say an overall warm climate in The South.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
True, but it's not really a constant thing. I mean Chicago gets to 100 degrees on average once every 2-3 years. The last time was a little over 4 years ago. The Great Lakes really have nothing to do with humidity up here, it's the humidity coming from the southeast that occasionally makes it up north during the summer.

Also - I'm 30 years old and from Iowa. The state really have only had 2 floods in the 30 years I've been alive...not really sure when the previous flood was - but Iowa is in absolutely no way a state that constantly floods. Last years flood there was the worst in recorded history. Before that was 15 years ago, which was the worst in history up until that point. There are minor floods on low lying areas every few years, but something that devestates areas or causes widespread disruption is extremely rare. The fact it's happened twice in 15 years is very unprecidented.
The heat index in the area is over 100 on a fairly regular basis in the summer, historically. When it's 100 degrees in Arizona, it feels like it's 100 degrees. When the temperature in Indiana or Illinois is 100 degrees, it feels like it's 115 degrees. See the difference. That's why they had to invent terms like "wind-chill factor" and "heat index", because the temperature itself may say one thing, but you go outside and it feels like something totally different.

So, it may say. . . 88 degrees, but feels like 100.

That was something that we grew up with as a reality
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Old 11-02-2009, 12:43 AM
 
Location: Houston
2,026 posts, read 3,674,141 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lake County IN View Post
Who said occasional?

Like I said, in RECENT history, weather has been a little milder with winters not being as cold and snowy and summers not being as hot, but that's only recent history.


When has the wind chill factor ever hit -30 in Atlanta? I don't consider 40 degrees a "cold snap". That's November weather.

Like I said,

With heat indexes of over 100 degrees

and wind chill factors of below zero, that is a more extreme swing in climate than say an overall warm climate in The South.



The heat index in the area is over 100 on a fairly regular basis in the summer, historically. When it's 100 degrees in Arizona, it feels like it's 100 degrees. When the temperature in Indiana or Illinois is 100 degrees, it feels like it's 115 degrees. See the difference. That's why they had to invent terms like "wind-chill factor" and "heat index", because the temperature itself may say one thing, but you go outside and it feels like something totally different.

So, it may say. . . 88 degrees, but feels like 100.

That was something that we grew up with as a reality
With the humidity in Houston, what do you think the heat index is on a day when it's about 110 (which happens regularly during the summer BTW)? Why do you seem to think that Illinois and Indian are more humid than the swampy marshes and everglades of the gulf coast? The heat index also has a lot more to do with just about humidity. A great amount of steel and concrete can greatly effect the heat index. So a summer day in urban Chicago is not going to be a much greater heat index than the majority of the Midwest. And in addition, summers in Phoenix don't need the heat index to reach 115. It's not uncommon for it to get up to 120's during the summer in Arizona. Heat index or not, Indiana and Illinois do not have the same kind of heat waves that we get in the South and the Midwest is not nearly as humid as the gulf coast.
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Old 11-02-2009, 01:01 AM
 
Location: Chicagoland
4,028 posts, read 6,394,762 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wpmeads View Post
With the humidity in Houston, what do you think the heat index is on a day when it's about 110 (which happens regularly during the summer BTW)? Why do you seem to think that Illinois and Indian are more humid than the swampy marshes and everglades of the gulf coast? The heat index also has a lot more to do with just about humidity. A great amount of steel and concrete can greatly effect the heat index. So a summer day in urban Chicago is not going to be a much greater heat index than the majority of the Midwest. And in addition, summers in Phoenix don't need the heat index to reach 115. It's not uncommon for it to get up to 120's during the summer in Arizona. Heat index or not, Indiana and Illinois do not have the same kind of heat waves that we get in the South and the Midwest is not nearly as humid as the gulf coast.
The record high for Houston is 106 and the record high for Phoenix is 122. That said, it wont get that hot in Houston and maybe only every few years in Phoenix.
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Old 11-02-2009, 01:07 AM
 
Location: Houston
2,026 posts, read 3,674,141 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thePR View Post
The record high for Houston is 106 and the record high for Phoenix is 122. That said, it wont get that hot in Houston and maybe only every few years in Phoenix.
No, I'm not sure about this summer (didn't live here over the summer), but it does get up to 109 in Houston. It was in like 2003 or something we had three days straight where it didn't drop below 108. And I think the all time recorded high for Houston was like 112 or something like that.
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Old 11-02-2009, 01:27 AM
 
Location: Chicagoland
4,028 posts, read 6,394,762 times
Reputation: 1305
Quote:
Originally Posted by wpmeads View Post
No, I'm not sure about this summer (didn't live here over the summer), but it does get up to 109 in Houston. It was in like 2003 or something we had three days straight where it didn't drop below 108. And I think the all time recorded high for Houston was like 112 or something like that.
I'm going by Weather.com because it's a trusted site.
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Old 11-02-2009, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,664,378 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thePR View Post
The record high for Houston is 106 and the record high for Phoenix is 122. That said, it wont get that hot in Houston and maybe only every few years in Phoenix.
Places on the gulf coast rarely crack the 100s due to the high humidity compared to places in the west. Our 90s are about the same if not more insufferable than Phoenix's 120s.
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Old 11-02-2009, 04:19 PM
 
6,046 posts, read 10,044,591 times
Reputation: 2334
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lake County IN View Post
Who said occasional?

Like I said, in RECENT history, weather has been a little milder with winters not being as cold and snowy and summers not being as hot, but that's only recent history.


When has the wind chill factor ever hit -30 in Atlanta? I don't consider 40 degrees a "cold snap". That's November weather.

Like I said,

With heat indexes of over 100 degrees

and wind chill factors of below zero, that is a more extreme swing in climate than say an overall warm climate in The South.



The heat index in the area is over 100 on a fairly regular basis in the summer, historically. When it's 100 degrees in Arizona, it feels like it's 100 degrees. When the temperature in Indiana or Illinois is 100 degrees, it feels like it's 115 degrees. See the difference. That's why they had to invent terms like "wind-chill factor" and "heat index", because the temperature itself may say one thing, but you go outside and it feels like something totally different.

So, it may say. . . 88 degrees, but feels like 100.

That was something that we grew up with as a reality
The record low in Atlanta is -9. If there was any wind that day, the wind chill may have gotten close to -30. Either way, -9 or -30 are both cold. I admit the North has a wider range of temperatures throughout the year (one of the reasons I didn't like living there). But you were acting like Northern cities should be on the same level as Southern cities when it comes to heat just because Northern cities get hot from time to time. The difference is the heat in the North doesn't last as long. You say 40 degrees isn't a cold snap...I say a few days of 90 degree weather is not a heat wave, no matter how high the heat index is.

Southerners know heat better, Northerners know cold better. End of discussion.
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Old 11-02-2009, 04:32 PM
 
1,513 posts, read 2,924,761 times
Reputation: 447
As a Northerner, I don't get it. If someone asks me if I think 40 is cold, I might say "kinda." But some Northerners will go on about how it gets to 0 here, and we get 3 feet of snow, and the resilient folks that we are, won't complain. BS. We complain, and most people would trade it away if they could. I've never really thought about the flip side, but I do love the heat. I spent 6 weeks in Atlanta and loved being able to go out at 10 and it's still 80 out, although, I have to admit I was in North Carolina two years ago during a particularly bad heat wave (it went up above 105 5 days in a row) and that just about killed me. The crazy thing was that I saw people doing construction still!

I would still take the bad with the good, and gladly trade Buffalo for the South. You all got it figured out down there!
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