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Old 11-02-2009, 05:20 PM
 
Location: Houston
2,026 posts, read 3,674,536 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thePR View Post
I'm going by Weather.com because it's a trusted site.
It depends on what part of Houston. I think that's the high for Hobby Airport. It does get over 110 in parts of Southeast Texas, but like jluke said, it doesn't get as hot in areas of high humidity because of the moisture in the air.
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Old 11-02-2009, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Long Island/NYC
11,334 posts, read 17,087,987 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
Places on the gulf coast rarely crack the 100s due to the high humidity compared to places in the west. Our 90s are about the same if not more insufferable than Phoenix's 120s.
Exactly, I've actually heard that a 105 degree day in Phoenix feels like an 85 degree day in NYC. The humidity makes a huge difference, I've been in Florida when the heat index was around Phoenix's all time high of 122 degrees and the temperature was only 98 degrees that day. I've been in NYC when the heat index was 120 degrees but the temperature was only 102 degrees on that day.

One thing I have noticed about Phoenix and Las Vegas is that their heat indexes are usually a few degrees lower than their actual temperatures while its the exact opposite on the Gulf Coast and the East Coast.
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Old 11-02-2009, 05:54 PM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,265,202 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Infamous92 View Post
Exactly, I've actually heard that a 105 degree day in Phoenix feels like an 85 degree day in NYC. The humidity makes a huge difference, I've been in Florida when the heat index was around Phoenix's all time high of 122 degrees and the temperature was only 98 degrees that day. I've been in NYC when the heat index was 120 degrees but the temperature was only 102 degrees on that day.

One thing I have noticed about Phoenix and Las Vegas is that their heat indexes are usually a few degrees lower than their actual temperatures while its the exact opposite on the Gulf Coast and the East Coast.
That's why they have the little water misters on all of the restaurant patios.
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Old 11-02-2009, 06:08 PM
 
Location: Houston
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Infamous92 View Post
Exactly, I've actually heard that a 105 degree day in Phoenix feels like an 85 degree day in NYC. The humidity makes a huge difference, I've been in Florida when the heat index was around Phoenix's all time high of 122 degrees and the temperature was only 98 degrees that day. I've been in NYC when the heat index was 120 degrees but the temperature was only 102 degrees on that day.

One thing I have noticed about Phoenix and Las Vegas is that their heat indexes are usually a few degrees lower than their actual temperatures while its the exact opposite on the Gulf Coast and the East Coast.
I mentioned this earlier, but large urban areas are going to have a much higher heat index than the rural areas in the region. A large amount of concrete, assault, and steel is going to make it much hotter than usual. So it would make sense if Manhattan can get up to a heat index of 120.
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Old 11-02-2009, 06:16 PM
 
Location: Long Island/NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wpmeads View Post
I mentioned this earlier, but large urban areas are going to have a much higher heat index than the rural areas in the region. A large amount of concrete, assault, and steel is going to make it much hotter than usual. So it would make sense if Manhattan can get up to a heat index of 120.
I know, I was referring to most of the NYC area though (not just Manhattan), I actually was in Queens on this day. I remember on the news they were walking around Manhattan with a thermometer and some places registered up to into the 130's.

I love the urban heat island effect as well, this Summer we had a low of 84 degrees (our average high is 86).
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Old 11-02-2009, 06:42 PM
 
Location: Houston
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Infamous92 View Post
I know, I was referring to most of the NYC area though (not just Manhattan), I actually was in Queens on this day. I remember on the news they were walking around Manhattan with a thermometer and some places registered up to into the 130's.

I love the urban heat island effect as well, this Summer we had a low of 84 degrees (our average high is 86).
Jeez. That's insane. Well I forgot your from New York. I'm sure that the extreme heat caused by urban areas is pretty common.

In Houston, you can have a 90 degree day (which is bellow average for a summer day) with about 70% humidity (about average for a summer afternoon), and if your downtown, uptown, TMC, around Relient Stadium and the Atrodome, or on one of the interstate highways, you can have a heat index up to 110.

Anyway, I don't doubt the heat index in NYC can get up to pretty high numbers.
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Old 11-02-2009, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
4,028 posts, read 6,395,450 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wpmeads View Post
It depends on what part of Houston. I think that's the high for Hobby Airport. It does get over 110 in parts of Southeast Texas, but like jluke said, it doesn't get as hot in areas of high humidity because of the moisture in the air.
Weather.com takes temperatures from where ever official temperatures are taken. Chicago's are at Midway even though we'd get lower temperatures at O'Hare. Just keeping it simple for us.
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Old 11-03-2009, 05:31 PM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,932,344 times
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Temperatures here are pretty mild during the winter. If you want to see brutal cold head to the northern rockies, upper midwest or Alaska in the winter. I gauge the severity of the climate based on the number of frost free days. If the number of frost free days are very low than the growing season is quite short. Snow can occur 8-9 months during an average year.
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Old 11-03-2009, 07:15 PM
 
11,172 posts, read 22,363,867 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thePR View Post
Weather.com takes temperatures from where ever official temperatures are taken. Chicago's are at Midway even though we'd get lower temperatures at O'Hare. Just keeping it simple for us.
Actually since 1980 the official site has been out at O'hare - so the temps are usually colder than the actual temp in the city, and many times in the summer as well because of the lake breezes.

O'hare is about 19 miles northwest of downtown, and obviously more "rural" since the land site is so huge.
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Old 11-03-2009, 11:01 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
4,028 posts, read 6,395,450 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
Actually since 1980 the official site has been out at O'hare - so the temps are usually colder than the actual temp in the city, and many times in the summer as well because of the lake breezes.

O'hare is about 19 miles northwest of downtown, and obviously more "rural" since the land site is so huge.
I thought it was the other way around?
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