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Old 11-06-2009, 02:54 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
11,543 posts, read 13,613,320 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grmasterb View Post
pretty much everybody, everywhere gripes about the weather.
best... Post.... Evar!!!!
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Old 11-06-2009, 03:44 PM
 
Location: where my heart is
5,642 posts, read 7,966,090 times
Reputation: 1661
In hindsight, I would now count as even more "toughness" than surviving walking a mile and a half in a blizzard, suriving go to a beach in Florida when the air temp was 95 degrees and the water temp was 90 degrees. For ME, that was much WORSE than the blizzard. At least in the blizzard I was prepared for and DRESSED for it.

NEVER again for the beach.
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Old 11-06-2009, 07:31 PM
 
Location: The Queen City
444 posts, read 1,028,837 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TANaples View Post
In hindsight, I would now count as even more "toughness" than surviving walking a mile and a half in a blizzard, suriving go to a beach in Florida when the air temp was 95 degrees and the water temp was 90 degrees. For ME, that was much WORSE than the blizzard. At least in the blizzard I was prepared for and DRESSED for it.

NEVER again for the beach.
Example #1
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Old 11-08-2009, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Mankato, MN
8 posts, read 12,737 times
Reputation: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcsfanatic View Post
Southerners don't brag about toughness in handling heat. Certainly not to the same degree nor the same level of exaggeration that northerners do.


For instance, in some places where it might snow on the odd occassion if schools close for a couple of inches of snow a northerner will respond with "we can have 2 feet of snow and schools would still be open" or if a southerner complains about feeling cold at 30 degrees the northerner response will be "this is nothing." The boasting goes to the point of exaggerating.

BUT....

When a northerner complains about excessive heat at 83 degrees, southerners don't boast about not turning on the air conditioning at 105 degrees or bragging about how much heat they can tolerate.

Why is it such a one way street?
First of all, I've never heard any of us 'northerners' complain that 83 degrees is hot (unless there is some pretty extreme humidity involved) and the reason we mock 'southerners' when they get 2 inches of snow is because they more or less shut down the entire towns because of the snowfall (which is very silly IMO). You don't see us 'northerners' shutting down our entire towns when temps get into the 90s do you? Also, its hard to sympathize with a 'southerner' when they think 30 degrees is cold because if they are experiencing temps in the 30s that means us 'northerners' are likely experiencing temps significantly colder then that (like below zero)...its not bragging but you seriously can't expect any sympathy out of us either
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Old 11-08-2009, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,667,906 times
Reputation: 7280
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigworm View Post
First of all, I've never heard any of us 'northerners' complain that 83 degrees is hot (unless there is some pretty extreme humidity involved) and the reason we mock 'southerners' when they get 2 inches of snow is because they more or less shut down the entire towns because of the snowfall (which is very silly IMO). You don't see us 'northerners' shutting down our entire towns when temps get into the 90s do you? Also, its hard to sympathize with a 'southerner' when they think 30 degrees is cold because if they are experiencing temps in the 30s that means us 'northerners' are likely experiencing temps significantly colder then that (like below zero)...its not bragging but you seriously can't expect any sympathy out of us either
I doubt we really care or ask for your sympathy and it's more of health issue than just us whining about the coldness. Lots of people seriously get sick and can't function as normal in the cold as someone who is more accustom to it.

You have people who come down here to the south and drop dead and pass out because of the excessive heat; yet unlike you; we understand some people's body can't handle some types of climates. Also, just because its cold down here; it doesn't mean it's going to much colder up north. It's called a cold front.

Right now it's 72 in Houston and only 68 in Chicago.
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Old 11-08-2009, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Houston
2,026 posts, read 3,674,536 times
Reputation: 466
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigworm View Post
First of all, I've never heard any of us 'northerners' complain that 83 degrees is hot (unless there is some pretty extreme humidity involved) and the reason we mock 'southerners' when they get 2 inches of snow is because they more or less shut down the entire towns because of the snowfall (which is very silly IMO). You don't see us 'northerners' shutting down our entire towns when temps get into the 90s do you? Also, its hard to sympathize with a 'southerner' when they think 30 degrees is cold because if they are experiencing temps in the 30s that means us 'northerners' are likely experiencing temps significantly colder then that (like below zero)...its not bragging but you seriously can't expect any sympathy out of us either
The reason towns in the South shut down with the slightest bit of ice or snow is because we don't have snow plows. Texas, for example, has more miles of highways and roads than any other state and it would be an insane waist of money maintain snow plows for that amount of roads millage when road conditions only get dangerous for a few days out of the year. It has more to do with road conditions and the lack of quality public transportation (conversation for another thread) in the South than "southerners can't handle temps bellow 30." Actually most people here like it when it gets bellow 30. That means there is high chance of getting snow which doesn't happen as much in the South.

Of course, we also think its kind it's kind of pathetic when people up north think 95 degrees and 60% humidity is extremely hot, but I call that a nice day. So, it works both ways. I don't think either the North or the South is that extreme of a climate. It just depends on what your used to.
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Old 11-08-2009, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,667,906 times
Reputation: 7280
Quote:
Originally Posted by wpmeads View Post
The reason towns in the South shut down with the slightest bit of ice or snow is because we don't have snow plows. Texas, for example, has more miles of highways and roads than any other state and it would be an insane waist of money maintain snow plows for that amount of roads millage when road conditions only get dangerous for a few days out of the year. It has more to do with road conditions and the lack of quality public transportation (conversation for another thread) in the South than "southerners can't handle temps bellow 30." Actually most people here like it when it gets bellow 30. That means there is more chance of getting snow which doesn't happen as much in the South.
and plus the cities really don't even shut down. It's mostly just the schools that are closed. People still usually have to go to work, and everyone still do their daily routines like going to the store or walking. We don't keep ourselves in the houses.
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Old 11-08-2009, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Houston
2,026 posts, read 3,674,536 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
and plus the cities really don't even shut down. It's mostly just the schools that are closed. People still usually have to go to work, and everyone still do their daily routines like going to the store or walking. We don't keep ourselves in the houses.
True, true. Schools shut down mainly for liability purposes. Most people are still are able to go to work unless road conditions are just that bad. Also, if there is a snow day, most people will go outside and enjoy the snow instead of just locking themselves inside.

Sotherners (and Texans) really do enjoy cold temperatures if there is snow. It doesn't happen much here, so we get excited when we do get snow. If it's blow 20 and there is no snow, it sucks all the fun out of cold temperatures for me at least.
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Old 11-08-2009, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Mankato, MN
8 posts, read 12,737 times
Reputation: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
I doubt we really care or ask for your sympathy and it's more of health issue than just us whining about the coldness. Lots of people seriously get sick and can't function as normal in the cold as someone who is more accustom to it.

You have people who come down here to the south and drop dead and pass out because of the excessive heat; yet unlike you; we understand some people's body can't handle some types of climates. Also, just because its cold down here; it doesn't mean it's going to much colder up north. It's called a cold front.

Right now it's 72 in Houston and only 68 in Chicago.
You are mistaking what I'm trying to say. I know you are not asking for our sympathy (and don't care). Maybe this will better explain it - say its 87 degrees in Minneapolis and we call you up on the phone and you live in for example Houston where it is 105 degrees and say something to you along the lines of how hot it is here in Minneapolis. What would your reaction be to that statement if you were living in Houston?

Also your definition of a cold front is incorrect. A cold front isn't what brings the cold air down that far south in the winter time. A strong low pressure (which rotates counter-clockwise) draws arctic air from the north down south (so a cold front can and does come through many times but doesn't really drastically affect the temperatures if there isn't any arctic air behind the cold front). In other words, if its in the 30s down south it is almost always well below that in the north since that is where the cold air is coming from and is thus 'entrenched' deeper into the arctic air from the north.

Plus temperatures are only part of the story. Yes we often times go through stretches up north where the high temperature doesn't get above '0' for several days in a row at a time but we also deal with 'wind chills' that are regularly well below '0' and often times -20 or -30 or even colder. This is the true killer up north - not just the air temperature. I've personally seen it many times where you can take a warm glass of water and throw it outside and have it instantly turn to ice/snow before it hits the ground...now thats cold!

In the summer months I would say high dewpoints/humidity is just as dangerous if not more dangerous then the temperatures. I realize the dewpoints down south are typically higher then they are up north. However, there are at least a few months out of the year where they are similar. However, I would argue that it gets more humid at times up north in the 'corn belt' as the corn soaks up the moisture and tends to 'radiate' it if that makes sense - kind of hard to explain unless you have experienced it but you can definitely feel the difference near a corn field.

Last edited by bigworm; 11-08-2009 at 01:40 PM..
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Old 11-08-2009, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Houston
2,026 posts, read 3,674,536 times
Reputation: 466
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigworm View Post
You are mistaking what I'm trying to say. I know you are not asking for our sympathy (and don't care). Maybe this will better explain it - say its 87 degrees in Minneapolis and we call you up on the phone and you live in for example Houston where it is 105 degrees and say something to you along the lines of how hot it is here in Minneapolis. What would your reaction be to that statement if you were living in Houston?

Also your definition of a cold front is incorrect. A cold front isn't what brings the cold air down that far south in the winter time. A strong low pressure (which rotates counter-clockwise) draws arctic air from the north down south (so a cold front can and does come through many times but doesn't really drastically affect the temperatures if there isn't any arctic air behind the cold front). In other words, if its in the 30s down south it is almost always well below that in the north since that is where the cold air is coming from and is thus 'entrenched' deeper into the arctic air from the north.

Plus temperatures are only part of the story. Yes we often times go through stretches up north where the high temperature doesn't get above '0' for several days in a row at a time but we also deal with 'wind chills' that are regularly well below '0' and often times -20 or -30 or even colder. This is the true killer up north - not just the air temperature. I've personally seen it many times where you can take a warm glass of water and throw it outside and have it instantly turn to ice/snow before it hits the ground...now thats cold!

In the summer months I would say high dewpoints/humidity is just as dangerous if not more dangerous then the temperatures. I realize the dewpoints down south are typically higher then they are up north. However, there are at least a few months out of the year where they are similar. However, I would argue that it gets more humid at times up north in the 'corn belt' as the corn soaks up the moisture and tends to 'radiate' it if that makes sense - kind of hard to explain unless you have experienced it but you can definitely feel the difference near a corn field.
I would agree with everything you just said. I can relate the wind chill factor thing as well. Basically wind chill would be to the cold what humidity is to the heat. I went to college in West Texas (which gets VERY windy BTW), and we had people from the north that would complain about how the cold on days when it was like 20. Well, with West Texas extreme wind conditions, a 20 degree day can have a wind chill factor below zero. And, like I said before, cold and wind with out snow just sucks. I think even most Northerners would agree with that.
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