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Old 10-31-2009, 10:10 PM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
13,856 posts, read 22,982,118 times
Reputation: 6688

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Quote:
Originally Posted by hsw View Post
Time spent learning most geography is wasteful, sort of like time (and money) wasted physically traveling and seeing tourist attractions

Would rather figure out in which cities and suburbs are HQs of world's most valuable companies...and where their top employees choose to live/dine/play, etc; how they commute to office, etc

In a Net era, such geography "self-learning" and virtual tourism only takes a few minutes (and is essentially free) for any curious, ambitious kid

Learning state capitals, names/locations of economically irrelevant cities/states, and names/locations of ThirdWorld countries that lack oil or something of value today (not 50+ yrs ago) is a huge waste of time w/opportunity costs
Things and nations can change. Knowing about say Indonesia now might be important in the future even though I don't believe its oil rich. Afghanistan wasn't all that important to us from 1989 to 1996. Although knowing about the fifty smallest economies might not be too necessary except when they have terrorists.
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Old 10-31-2009, 11:39 PM
 
20 posts, read 66,543 times
Reputation: 18
I remember taking Geography in 9th grade. Part of my final consisted of labeling 150+ countries on a world map.
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Old 11-01-2009, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Columbus,Ohio
1,014 posts, read 3,121,202 times
Reputation: 483
When I want to high school it was not taught and this was in the late 60s and early 70s. However when I was to parochial catholic school for my 1st seven years it was taught since the third grade. I could never understand why it was not taught in high school even though back then I would have found the subject to be a bit on the boring side.
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Old 11-01-2009, 10:43 AM
 
11,177 posts, read 22,394,180 times
Reputation: 10924
In Iowa I had an entire class in 10th grade that was Geography.

We had to be able to locate on a map and spell correctly every state and capital, as well as every country on earth and its capital.
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Old 11-02-2009, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Sarasota, Florida
15,400 posts, read 19,583,269 times
Reputation: 11067
It was MANDATORY when I was in school as well it should be. When people cannot find Iraq on a map for instance that signals trouble....we are far behind the Industrialized world in education...especially the Sciences and Mathematics.

We are putting our country in a very precarious position by not educating each generation to it's fullest potential!
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Old 11-02-2009, 12:33 PM
 
Location: Where the grass grows
175 posts, read 276,934 times
Reputation: 87
Well, Geography is very important for all in our life. So, I can't uderstand this video.


YouTube - Americans are NOT stupid - WITH SUBTITLES

But Miss Teen USA 2007, yes!


YouTube - Miss Teen USA 2007 - South Carolina answers a question
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Old 11-02-2009, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Where the grass grows
175 posts, read 276,934 times
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I know Geography and americans is a topic, and we can't make generalizations with it, but I mean that a country needs very well cultured citizens, and, then, to make specialists.
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Old 11-02-2009, 11:22 PM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
13,856 posts, read 22,982,118 times
Reputation: 6688
I think they tend to take the dumbest people in those to make it funnier. However I really have had people come up to me and say "you're the geography person so is Africa one country, like Australia is, or is it a bunch of countries?"

Some confusions I understand a bit better. Like that runner who won the New York Marathon was born in Eritrea. My Dad wasn't really sure where that was or anything, but I don't see that as a sign of anything as Eritrea was not internationally recognized until 1993 and my Dad is in his 60s. Likewise if asked a country beginning with "U" I might think a bit before answering Ukraine or maybe Uruguay. (There's also Uganda, Uzbekistan, and probably one I'm forgetting) Somehow countries like "United States" and "United Kingdom" strike me as different, like the U is part of a title almost rather than a name.
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Old 11-03-2009, 02:17 AM
 
Location: Miami/ Washington DC
4,836 posts, read 10,196,187 times
Reputation: 2512
I agree Geography is a very important thing. I never had a real geography class in High School it was always just a small part of my history classes. Now I attend college after a few geography classes I decided to double major in it. Obviously a major in geography is not where France and or about maps. It is much much more than that. But I think a simple semester geography class would be great in HS.

I do know that my HS I graduated from now offers Human Geography which I think is the best geography course out there at any level.
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Old 11-03-2009, 09:12 AM
 
2,231 posts, read 5,426,138 times
Reputation: 537
Quote:
Originally Posted by hsw View Post
Time spent learning most geography is wasteful, sort of like time (and money) wasted physically traveling and seeing tourist attractions

Would rather figure out in which cities and suburbs are HQs of world's most valuable companies...and where their top employees choose to live/dine/play, etc; how they commute to office, etc

In a Net era, such geography "self-learning" and virtual tourism only takes a few minutes (and is essentially free) for any curious, ambitious kid

Learning state capitals, names/locations of economically irrelevant cities/states, and names/locations of ThirdWorld countries that lack oil or something of value today (not 50+ yrs ago) is a huge waste of time w/opportunity costs
I'd agree with the general tenor of this post. Memorizing state capitols is pointless, in most cases, since the major population centers are often not the capitals of state politics. Is Albany the most important metropolis of New York State? In Texas, half of the state population lives in either Dallas or Houston... these two metros have a combined population of about 12 million... if all you know is that Austin is the "capital" of Texas, then you know next to nothing.
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