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View Poll Results: What type of living do you prefer?
Huge Metropolis 1,000,000+ 26 28.89%
Big City 500,000-1,000,000 13 14.44%
Middle of the Road 250,000-500,000 5 5.56%
Small City 100,000-250,000 16 17.78%
Tiny City 50,000-100,000 14 15.56%
Rural Area >50,000 16 17.78%
Voters: 90. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-11-2007, 06:10 AM
 
Location: South Carolina
5,298 posts, read 5,775,000 times
Reputation: 8141

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I definately prefer a smaller city,less traffic and less crowds.
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Old 05-11-2007, 06:41 AM
 
Location: Coachella Valley, California
15,564 posts, read 36,578,526 times
Reputation: 13182
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rance View Post
I can't breath in a big city. I drove to southern MN last April, going through places like Edmonton and Minneapolis/St. Paul. I mean I actually darn near start hyperventilating when I get into crowds or traffic congestion. I would have to ease into a large city. Just plunging in takes my breath away. And if there were no mountains to use as landmarks or direction...I'd be lost in 5 minutes. I need room to breathe!

Those photos look .............. COLD!!!
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Old 05-11-2007, 07:09 AM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 23,814,761 times
Reputation: 4901
I prefer the freedom of rural living. In the city you're life is ruled by your job, but in the country your life has a connection to the land. In the 21'st century you're not as isolated in the country as you would have been in the nineteenth century. Rural beats urban for me anytime!
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Old 05-11-2007, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,489 posts, read 16,171,370 times
Reputation: 5641
Rural areas are beautiful, but I'd go crazy living in one. I love taking weekend trips to the Adirondacks or Vermont, but by Sunday evening I'm ready to be back in the metro area.

I voted for huge metropolis. I've lived in smaller places and quickly got bored and restless.
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Old 05-11-2007, 09:09 AM
 
Location: alt reality
1,084 posts, read 1,999,838 times
Reputation: 930
Mega metropolis for me. I can walk to the corner store and restaurants. When the snow comes, the streets get plowed faster. When my car breaks down, I can hop right on the bus.
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Old 05-11-2007, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,608 posts, read 20,731,073 times
Reputation: 5347
I think the poll choices are totally off, staggered incorrectly. Huge metropolis, 1,000,000+? There are over 50 MSA's in the United States with populations greater than 1 million. And "Big City 500,000 - 1,000,000"? I don't think anybody would consider Tucson, AZ, Bakersfield, CA, Albuquerque, NM, or Wichita, KS to be "the Big City." Instead, I would split it up like this:

Giant 1st tier megalopolis: 10mil+ (NYC/ Northern NJ/ CT/ Long Island, LA/Southern California, the entire combined Bay Area)
2nd tier megalopolis areas: 4.5 mil- 10mil (Chicago, Dallas, Houston, Boston, Philly, DC, Atlanta)
Major Metropolitan areas: 2mil-4 mil (Phoenix, Denver, KC, Saint Louis, MSP, Pittsburgh, etc)
Small Metropolitan areas: 1mil-2 mil (Las Vegas, SLC, Austin, OKC, Milwaukee)
Big towns: .3mil-1mil (Colorado Springs, Ann Arbor, Wichita, Madison)
Towns: 80,000-300,000
Small Towns/micropolitan areas: <80,000
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Old 05-11-2007, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
30,230 posts, read 67,385,459 times
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Tiny cities rock my world! Scranton (pop. 70,000) and Wilkes-Barre (pop. 40,000) have fine arts, great private schools, outstanding universities, coffee houses, WiFi, and all of the other positive attributes of the major metropolises two hours to our south and east, but we have a fraction of the crime, traffic congestion, soaring cost-of-living, and stress. What's not to love? If you can lump all of the strengths of larger cities together, minimize their defects, and wrap that up into a nice, neat package, then I'm in paradise! I can't wait to have my downtown loft where I can have a view of mountains and historic homes instead of grime and crime.
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Old 05-11-2007, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
30,230 posts, read 67,385,459 times
Reputation: 15868
Quote:
Originally Posted by vegaspilgrim View Post
I think the poll choices are totally off, staggered incorrectly. Huge metropolis, 1,000,000+? There are over 50 MSA's in the United States with populations greater than 1 million. And "Big City 500,000 - 1,000,000"? I don't think anybody would consider Tucson, AZ, Bakersfield, CA, Albuquerque, NM, or Wichita, KS to be "the Big City." Instead, I would split it up like this:

Giant 1st tier megalopolis: 10mil+ (NYC/ Northern NJ/ CT/ Long Island, LA/Southern California, the entire combined Bay Area)
2nd tier megalopolis areas: 4.5 mil- 10mil (Chicago, Dallas, Houston, Boston, Philly, DC, Atlanta)
Major Metropolitan areas: 2mil-4 mil (Phoenix, Denver, KC, Saint Louis, MSP, Pittsburgh, etc)
Small Metropolitan areas: 1mil-2 mil (Las Vegas, SLC, Austin, OKC, Milwaukee)
Big towns: .3mil-1mil (Colorado Springs, Ann Arbor, Wichita, Madison)
Towns: 80,000-300,000
Small Towns/micropolitan areas: <80,000
Speedy clarified that he was referring only to the city propers themselves, not the MSAs, as we all realize that the majority of Americans now live in the suburbs.
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Old 05-11-2007, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
30,230 posts, read 67,385,459 times
Reputation: 15868
Quote:
Originally Posted by tallrick View Post
I prefer the freedom of rural living. In the city you're life is ruled by your job, but in the country your life has a connection to the land. In the 21'st century you're not as isolated in the country as you would have been in the nineteenth century. Rural beats urban for me anytime!
Very astute observations. I'm one of those rush-rush "all work and no play" types, and I allow my career to dominate my life. However, I'm quite content living this way while I'm young and filled with energy. At some point in the future I may want to just "get away from it all" and retreat to a nice lakeside cabin in Aroostook County, Maine, where my only neighbors will be moose!
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Old 05-11-2007, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
30,230 posts, read 67,385,459 times
Reputation: 15868
Quote:
Originally Posted by Twinkle Toes View Post
Those photos look .............. COLD!!!
I know! They're absolutely heavenly, aren't they?
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