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Old 08-01-2010, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Germantown, MD
1,359 posts, read 3,275,676 times
Reputation: 569

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexis4Jersey View Post
Yes , Electrification down to Richmond and Eventually to Hampton Roads. Electrification up to Portland and reopening of a JCT and Boston for Trains to go to North Station instead of building a NEC. Sped up averages to 140-60 in spots. New Wires , Bridges , Tunnels and more Tracks , increasing it form 2 to 3 , 3 to 4 , 4 to 6 and 6 to 8 in some places. Then once the main NEC is overhauled each NE will accelerate feeder lines which connect almost every city in the region with Rail.
The CSX ROW Amtrak uses down to Richmond and Hampton Roads (the old RF&P main) will not be electrified. The ROW will eventually be upgraded to allow (diesel-powered) trains to travel at speeds up to 110mph along a 3 track main (the NEC allows up to 150mph in New England, and 135mph in the Mid-Atlantic and is mostly 3-4 tracks). This plan is a part of the Southeast High Speed Corridor between DC and Jacksonville, FL. So far however only Virginia and North Carolina have demonstrated a remote interest in planning or funding the project. The only true (125mph+) new high speed lines to be built in this country anytime soon will be in California and probably Florida.

As far as I'm know (and what I assume is the common understanding) the BosWash Corridor starts/ends in Fredericksburg, VA and Manchester, NH. In other words the Southern and Northern tips of the Washington D.C. and Boston metropolitan areas respectively.
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Old 08-01-2010, 03:21 PM
 
Location: On the Rails in Northern NJ
12,381 posts, read 23,364,419 times
Reputation: 4519
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpterp View Post
The CSX ROW Amtrak uses down to Richmond and Hampton Roads (the old RF&P main) will not be electrified. The ROW will eventually be upgraded to allow (diesel-powered) trains to travel at speeds up to 110mph along a 3 track main (the NEC allows up to 150mph in New England, and 135mph in the Mid-Atlantic and is mostly 3-4 tracks). This plan is a part of the Southeast High Speed Corridor between DC and Jacksonville, FL. So far however only Virginia and North Carolina have demonstrated a remote interest in planning or funding the project. The only true (125mph+) new high speed lines to be built in this country anytime soon will be in California and probably Florida.

As far as I'm know (and what I assume is the common understanding) the BosWash Corridor starts/ends in Fredericksburg, VA and Manchester, NH. In other words the Southern and Northern tips of the Washington D.C. and Boston metropolitan areas respectively.
Ummm , thats not what the 2030 Amtrak plans call for and the whole NEC will be upgraded to 160+ Averages. Most of the NEC can hit that today , but Voltages and wires are wrong. DC & Jacksonville? I never heard of that plan. I have all the 2030-60 plans on my Flickr , the Northeast and Virgina are restoring what we used to have pre-RR destruction. Electrification down to Richmond will happen , and up to Portland and on several other NE lines. The Bos-Wash does not start and end at the places you say , in 20 years it won't be the Bos-Wash.
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Old 08-02-2010, 03:17 AM
 
Location: Germantown, MD
1,359 posts, read 3,275,676 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexis4Jersey View Post
Ummm , thats not what the 2030 Amtrak plans call for and the whole NEC will be upgraded to 160+ Averages. Most of the NEC can hit that today , but Voltages and wires are wrong. DC & Jacksonville? I never heard of that plan. I have all the 2030-60 plans on my Flickr , the Northeast and Virgina are restoring what we used to have pre-RR destruction. Electrification down to Richmond will happen , and up to Portland and on several other NE lines. The Bos-Wash does not start and end at the places you say , in 20 years it won't be the Bos-Wash.

The top speed on the NEC is 150mph on a short stretch in Rhode Island, and only the Acela Express can reach that speed. Between New York and DC the top speed is mostly 125mph, with 135mph stretches in central New Jersey and northeast Maryland. As you said, the wires (catenary) are a limiting factor, but only on the Mid-Atlantic portion (DC-NY). The New England catenary is much newer.

Here's the Northeast Corridor Master Plan released by Amtrak earlier this year (It includes branches off the corridor such as the Keystone Corridor to Harrisburg, Springfield Corridor, and Virginia Service along the CSX ROW--see pg.115):

http://www.amtrak.com/servlet/BlobSe...9-2010_v1a.pdf


The Southeast High Speed Rail Corridor does actually exist and just won $620 million dollars for upgrades as part of the ARRA Stimulus:

Southeast High Speed Rail Corridor - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Fact Sheet: High Speed Intercity Passenger Rail Program: Charlotte - Raleigh - Richmond - Washington, D.C. | The White House

Where the BosWas corridor begins and ends varies from source to source, but in terms of a continous, uninterrupted corridor of metropolitan areas sharing similar economies, demographics, cultures, densities, etc. it begins/ends in DC and Boston metro areas as the name indicates. Maybe that won't be the case in 20 years, but that's basically how it is now.
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Old 08-02-2010, 06:25 AM
 
Location: On the Rails in Northern NJ
12,381 posts, read 23,364,419 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpterp View Post
The top speed on the NEC is 150mph on a short stretch in Rhode Island, and only the Acela Express can reach that speed. Between New York and DC the top speed is mostly 125mph, with 135mph stretches in central New Jersey and northeast Maryland. As you said, the wires (catenary) are a limiting factor, but only on the Mid-Atlantic portion (DC-NY). The New England catenary is much newer.

Here's the Northeast Corridor Master Plan released by Amtrak earlier this year (It includes branches off the corridor such as the Keystone Corridor to Harrisburg, Springfield Corridor, and Virginia Service along the CSX ROW--see pg.115):

http://www.amtrak.com/servlet/BlobSe...9-2010_v1a.pdf


The Southeast High Speed Rail Corridor does actually exist and just won $620 million dollars for upgrades as part of the ARRA Stimulus:

Southeast High Speed Rail Corridor - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Fact Sheet: High Speed Intercity Passenger Rail Program: Charlotte - Raleigh - Richmond - Washington, D.C. | The White House

Where the BosWas corridor begins and ends varies from source to source, but in terms of a continous, uninterrupted corridor of metropolitan areas sharing similar economies, demographics, cultures, densities, etc. it begins/ends in DC and Boston metro areas as the name indicates. Maybe that won't be the case in 20 years, but that's basically how it is now.
I'm aware of what the top and average speeds of the NEC are. I rail fan it abit , i was talking about the Future NEC network which in the Document. East of New Haven is new. South of NYC to Wilmington should be upgraded by 2020 and the rest upgraded or UC. Amtrak plans on Electrifying down to Richmond. CT-MA plan on Electrifying a few of Amtrak's corridors when they start new Commuter Rail service. SEHSR is a completely different network then the NEC. Eventually the NEC will extend down to Norfolk and up to Portland give it some time. North of Boston is next to become denser there is alot of TOD going on along the Downeaster and surrounding towns.
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Old 01-23-2013, 07:13 PM
 
149 posts, read 222,706 times
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i dont know how in the heck richmond and especially hampton roads are consider northeast corridor when hampton roads touches north carolina and has more in common with north carolina than any other places.
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Old 01-23-2013, 08:03 PM
 
Location: Lincoln, NE (via SW Virginia)
1,644 posts, read 1,794,252 times
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The boswash corridor stretches from Columbia SC up to Quebec city
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Old 01-23-2013, 09:58 PM
 
781 posts, read 1,093,632 times
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If you wiki Northeast corridor or BosWash Richmond Va is mentioned, if i agree with it or not idk but it is mentioned.
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Old 01-23-2013, 10:55 PM
 
Location: Metro Atlanta & Savannah, GA - Corpus Christi, TX
4,471 posts, read 7,286,802 times
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I would define the corridor more specifically from Fredericksburg, Virginia to Portsmouth, New Hampshire... or perhaps as far south as Richmond, VA and as far north as Portland, ME.
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Old 01-23-2013, 11:35 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,488 posts, read 16,148,250 times
Reputation: 5632
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikemike84 View Post
i dont know how in the heck richmond and especially hampton roads are consider northeast corridor when hampton roads touches north carolina and has more in common with north carolina than any other places.
I agree that Richmond and Tidewater are stretches, but if you look at a population density map, there's a lot less gap to fill between Richmond/Tidewater and DC than the wide open spaces between Richmond/Tidewater and Raleigh, etc. Despite fairly close proximity of Richmond and Tidewater to Raleigh, I feel the VA metros and the NC metros "face away" from one another. Raleigh is more tied to cities south/west from itself. The VA metros are more tied to cities north/east from themselves. Drive time from Norfolk to Washington is about the same as drive time from Norfolk to Raleigh, but I feel people in Norfolk are more connected to DC than to the NC cities. And Norfolk is closer to New York than it is to Atlanta. Richmond and Tidewater are certainly part of the south, but they're on the edge of the densely populated northeastern corridor. And as rail connections, more cheap flights, and those discount bus lines keep providing cheap ways for people to travel to those northern cities, economic ties may strengthen.

I don't know that I'd call Richmond or Tidewater part of the Northeast Corridor (at least not yet), but they're in close proximity to it.
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Old 01-24-2013, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Baltimore / Montgomery County, MD
1,196 posts, read 2,120,399 times
Reputation: 512
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikemike84 View Post
i dont know how in the heck richmond and especially hampton roads are consider northeast corridor when hampton roads touches north carolina and has more in common with north carolina than any other places.
They aren't the NEC or BosWash!! Richmond and Hampton Roads have 100% southern influence and even in the infrastructure is different. Hell kids down there even say ma'am and sir. C'mon that's straight up country.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wnewberry22 View Post
The boswash corridor stretches from Columbia SC up to Quebec city
Hell no.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Diff1 View Post
If you wiki Northeast corridor or BosWash Richmond Va is mentioned, if i agree with it or not idk but it is mentioned.
Richmond is not apart of BosWash PERIOD!

Quote:
Originally Posted by WanderingImport View Post
I would define the corridor more specifically from Fredericksburg, Virginia to Portsmouth, New Hampshire... or perhaps as far south as Richmond, VA and as far north as Portland, ME.
Nope and nope. BosWash ends exactly at the Potomac River... Virginia is dixie.
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