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Old 12-06-2009, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Virginia Beach/Norfolk.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by damian View Post
Looks Like Hampton Roads and Richmond are not far off from the NE Megalopolis

Northeast - America 2050
No, according to that, in 2050, Hampton Roads and Richmond are in the Northeast megalopolis.
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Old 12-06-2009, 08:27 PM
 
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Here is another link with HR and Richmond already in the BW corridor

Mega-Regions and High-Speed Rail - Richard Florida
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Old 12-06-2009, 09:49 PM
 
Location: Germantown, MD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cityboi757 View Post
No, according to that, in 2050, Hampton Roads and Richmond are in the Northeast megalopolis.
Actually they're not. They're circled but the "red" doesn't cover them (like Salt Lake City and the "Front Range" and Kansas City and the "Great Lakes"). Look at this map which shows all the regions: http://www.america2050.org/images/20...ns2008_150.png. You can see the disconnect (the drop-off of the red shading) between DC and Richmond. Apparently Portland is included though.
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Old 12-07-2009, 07:08 AM
 
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Well, the maps are ambiguous. The one I posted had the two areas shaded in red, just a little bit b/w Richmond and DC was not shaded. If areas in the Great Lakes Megaregion can be joined and are hundreds of miles apart,then it is not unreasonable to begin to include Richmond and HR together. James City County and New Kent county that border HR and Richmond are growing rapidly, thus forming a continuum between those two metro areas. Caroline county is going to form the bridge between Richmond and DC, completing the gap.
Right now, Hampton Roads, Richmond and NOVA are already labelled the urban crescent of VA
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Old 12-07-2009, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Germantown, MD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by damian View Post
Well, the maps are ambiguous. The one I posted had the two areas shaded in red, just a little bit b/w Richmond and DC was not shaded. If areas in the Great Lakes Megaregion can be joined and are hundreds of miles apart,then it is not unreasonable to begin to include Richmond and HR together. James City County and New Kent county that border HR and Richmond are growing rapidly, thus forming a continuum between those two metro areas. Caroline county is going to form the bridge between Richmond and DC, completing the gap.
Right now, Hampton Roads, Richmond and NOVA are already labelled the urban crescent of VA
Well if cities like St. Louis and Louisville are included in the "Great Lakes" megapolis then rationally you would have to include Richmond and Hampton Rds in BosWas. The thing is in reality those cities aren't really associated with those regions.

Richmond and Hampton Roads are probably connected, but I think there's still a large gap between Richmond and DC distance-wise, culturally, and economically. The population density of Caroline County is only 41/sq.mi. and I very much doubt that if you took a direct route city-to-city from DC to Boston you would pass through a county with anywhere near that low density. In Maryland the lowest density is in Cecil County (part of the Philadelphia Metro Area), which has 246 persons/sq.mi.

Maybe 40 years from now it will be different, although the current recession has put us behind at least 5-10 years in terms of projected growth for most metro areas. However, as of right now the BosWas corridor ends at either F'burg or Springfield.
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Old 12-07-2009, 09:47 AM
 
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Well, I do agree that those two regions are not part of Boswash yet, however, by the latest 2050, they will be linked. Richard Florida in an interview a few months ago here in Norfolk stated that HR and Richmond are being influenced already by Boswash, which is probably why he shaded them red in one of his maps. With HSR going to Richmond and HR, that link will be here sooner than later.
In terms of culture, a person from Fredericksburg or Stafford county is going to have little in common with someone from Boston. The megaregion idea has more to do with economic integration than culture. Right now, Hampton Roads is tremendously affected by happenings in NOVA and DC
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Old 07-17-2010, 02:00 PM
 
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I think that the Richmond area and Hampton Roads area are somewhat connected, transportation, culturally and location wise. There has to be someway that the BosWash megalopolis stretches to Richmond and HR. But then again, the Richmond area is somewhat far away from Manassas, which I consider the southern tip of the entire D.C. metropolitian area.
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Old 07-17-2010, 03:23 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PITTSTON2SARASOTA View Post
File:Boswash.png - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia But I too would include Richmond...some maps have it extending as far west as Scranton/Wilkes-Barre and Allentown/Bethelem???


I don't think that the boswash spreads all the way out to scranton and wilkes barre and albany NY or to southern maine that's a little to far in my opinion.
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Old 07-17-2010, 04:12 PM
 
Location: New England & The Maritimes
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I really question whether people who are talking about southern Maine have ever been to the area.

Someone proposed the northern border being at "cape neddick". Soooo York is in BosWash but Wells and Kennebunk are not? Southern Maine is an entity from Kittery to just past Portland, I don't see why it would be divided. If you really think Portland isn't in BosWash then none of Maine is.
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Old 07-17-2010, 05:25 PM
 
1,250 posts, read 2,116,491 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpterp View Post
Well if cities like St. Louis and Louisville are included in the "Great Lakes" megapolis then rationally you would have to include Richmond and Hampton Rds in BosWas. The thing is in reality those cities aren't really associated with those regions.

Richmond and Hampton Roads are probably connected, but I think there's still a large gap between Richmond and DC distance-wise, culturally, and economically. The population density of Caroline County is only 41/sq.mi. and I very much doubt that if you took a direct route city-to-city from DC to Boston you would pass through a county with anywhere near that low density. In Maryland the lowest density is in Cecil County (part of the Philadelphia Metro Area), which has 246 persons/sq.mi.

Maybe 40 years from now it will be different, although the current recession has put us behind at least 5-10 years in terms of projected growth for most metro areas. However, as of right now the BosWas corridor ends at either F'burg or Springfield.
Interesting is most of the time St. Louis is not a part of a Great Lakes region and mainly is in no region. Odd they put Kansas City as part of it since it is more likely to be connected with Texas.

This also has to take into account what it might look like decades from now as to how connected different metro areas are. Some areas near the edges of any might become less connected to one but more connected to another. I think the basic cores of the megalopoluses are correct and its just the fringes that are subject to change.
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