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Old 02-28-2010, 07:31 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Yeah, I've noticed that too. Geography has a lot to do with that. For instance, with NY, most of the Hispanics/Latinos here come from the Caribbean and it isn't as easy for them to immigrate here, as it would for say Mexicans to come to Texas, California and other Southwestern states. Same with the proximity of Asian immigrants to those states in comparison to NY. While NY still has their share, it's not like CA and Texas.

What also makes it more interesting for NY is that many of the Hispanics/Latinos are of African descent. So, there is a somewhat shared culture between African-Americans/Blacks with roots in the Caribbean and the Hispanic/Latino communities here. In TX and CA, the Hispanics/Latinos are more Mestizo(Native/Spanish and some African mix). So, the cultures are generally more different.

NY's Black population is also growing, but mainly due to immigration from the Caribbean and Africa.
There is no shared culture between blacks from the carribean and pr. Just because someone is the same color does not mean we are the same culturally. We eat different foods,have different ideas,etc.

 
Old 02-28-2010, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,577,680 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerseygal4u View Post
There is no shared culture between blacks from the carribean and pr. Just because someone is the same color does not mean we are the same culturally. We eat different foods,have different ideas,etc.
Finally, someone that acknowledges this.
 
Old 02-28-2010, 07:39 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Fairfaxian View Post
So why when I do the exact same thing, I'm called a "self-hating racist" as you mentioned how I was a few pages back. If any of you took my posting as "racist," I apologize. My scorning isn't applicable to ALL African Americans. And being from Maryland, I would think you would understand some of the actions of people from certain (not all, but certain) black neighborhoods.

The reason I may come off as more insensitive is because of the experiences I've faced. I'm assuming that most of you who speak well of the overall black community are from predominantly black neighborhoods that embraced you as one of their own, or were raised back in earlier decades when black camaraderie was much more common. Well, I didn't receive the total love and embrace that the black community bragged about, so yea, I admit to being very bitter of it. And being reminded constantly of not being unwanted by the local community that apparently is supposed to be connected by a "shared history" really gets nauseating after years of the same old hypocritical garbage! It's something I can't talk about with 90 percent of my family members, and I really don't want to wear out the 10 percent who understands what I'm facing.


Well I definitely need to at least check out Houston. This is assuming that the black communities aren't all that monolithic. And now that I think about it, wasn't it during the 70s/60s and earlier when blacks were trying to make make do for themselves, integrate into the American mainstream, and make progress through academic and peaceful means that the most resistance and riots were started by the whites who were racist? It seems that today, every other non-black person loves to complain about the violent and ghetto behaviors of a few blacks, but no one wants to protest it. Also, I recall from my experiences while attended college in Maryland, there was a much more embrace of blacks who would act like buffoons and wannabe thugs. The reason I may constantly bash the Northeast for this (Urbanized BosWash Northeast, NOT Rural Upstate Northeast) is because most of the non-blacks would always try to and patronize normal and educated blacks, try to nullify their achievements, and act like they're no better than those who act bitter, ghetto, and uneducated. I consider this worse in terms of racist acts than straight out yelling racial slurs. But in my experience, this is hardly an issue with non-blacks from nearly all of the other regions.

Doesn't it make one wonder?
I agree with u on the acting like a buffoon. and it does seem you are embraced more by both white and black
 
Old 02-28-2010, 07:48 PM
 
Location: from houstoner to bostoner to new yorker to new jerseyite ;)
4,085 posts, read 11,459,173 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerseygal4u View Post
There is no shared culture between blacks from the carribean and pr. Just because someone is the same color does not mean we are the same culturally. We eat different foods,have different ideas,etc.
I think ckhthankgod means there is more "mixing" among African-American blacks, Caribbeans, and Latinos of African descent in the Northeast than there is between blacks and mestizo Latinos (mainly Mexican where I'm from in Texas) in the South. And he's not wrong. I've certainly noticed this difference between living in Texas and Massachusetts/Rhode Island, where there is additionally a large white Portuguese, Azorean, and Cape Verdean population to throw into the mix. I also think it's not quite true to say there is no shared culture between these groups. They certainly have their own distinct cultures, however I have Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Haitian friends who would readily acknowledge they share some traits in common as well, or let's say MORE in common, than with American Anglo-culture minorities (for lack of a better term), such as religion, language, similar foods, music, social/class structure, history, etc. But back to his point, you see a lot more variety of skin shades within these groups than you will probably ever see with the majority of Mexicans down South, which is pretty telling in itself.
 
Old 02-28-2010, 07:51 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,342,712 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicagoland60426 View Post
I am aware of that. MLK and Malcolm X were big on religion. I personally think there are too many churches/houses of worship. In many predominately black areas, there are around 10-15 churches within a mile radius. Some only a block away from one another.
If you're talking about the plethora of storefront churches in some neighborhoods, I might be inclined to agree but for a totally different reason.


Quote:
I just like to see more secular/atheist blacks around my way.
How'd you know they were there anyway? You're not going to see "First Atheist Church" or something to let you know, LOL.
 
Old 02-28-2010, 08:46 PM
 
56,747 posts, read 81,061,259 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bostoner View Post
I think ckhthankgod means there is more "mixing" among African-American blacks, Caribbeans, and Latinos of African descent in the Northeast than there is between blacks and mestizo Latinos (mainly Mexican where I'm from in Texas) in the South. And he's not wrong. I've certainly noticed this difference between living in Texas and Massachusetts/Rhode Island, where there is additionally a large white Portuguese, Azorean, and Cape Verdean population to throw into the mix. I also think it's not quite true to say there is no shared culture between these groups. They certainly have their own distinct cultures, however I have Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Haitian friends who would readily acknowledge they share some traits in common as well, or let's say MORE in common, than with American Anglo-culture minorities (for lack of a better term), such as religion, language, similar foods, music, social/class structure, history, etc. But back to his point, you see a lot more variety of skin shades within these groups than you will probably ever see with the majority of Mexicans down South, which is pretty telling in itself.
That is exactly my point. How can people not see the African cultural influence among those groups and the aspect of interaction in the Northeast between said groups? You are also correct about the variation in skin complextionwithin the different groups as well
 
Old 02-28-2010, 10:23 PM
 
Location: from houstoner to bostoner to new yorker to new jerseyite ;)
4,085 posts, read 11,459,173 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
That is exactly my point. How can people not see the African cultural influence among those groups and the aspect of interaction in the Northeast between said groups? You are also correct about the variation in skin complextionwithin the different groups as well
It stood out to me immediately coming from Texas, where most black people speak only English, not Spanish, French, Haitian Creole, Cape Verdean Creole, or Portuguese. If you dropped many of them off in Texas, most people there wouldn't know they aren't "just black" until they opened their mouths! These groups mix together here much more with each other and with black Americans than the blacks and mestizo Latinos of TX and CA.

I forgot to mention there are a lot of Brazilians and Dominicans in this area, too.
 
Old 02-28-2010, 11:04 PM
 
8,226 posts, read 10,802,397 times
Reputation: 7622
Quote:
Originally Posted by bostoner View Post
I think ckhthankgod means there is more "mixing" among African-American blacks, Caribbeans, and Latinos of African descent in the Northeast than there is between blacks and mestizo Latinos (mainly Mexican where I'm from in Texas) in the South. And he's not wrong. I've certainly noticed this difference between living in Texas and Massachusetts/Rhode Island, where there is additionally a large white Portuguese, Azorean, and Cape Verdean population to throw into the mix. I also think it's not quite true to say there is no shared culture between these groups. They certainly have their own distinct cultures, however I have Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Haitian friends who would readily acknowledge they share some traits in common as well, or let's say MORE in common, than with American Anglo-culture minorities (for lack of a better term), such as religion, language, similar foods, music, social/class structure, history, etc. But back to his point, you see a lot more variety of skin shades within these groups than you will probably ever see with the majority of Mexicans down South, which is pretty telling in itself.
But,they don't acknowledge they are black. Just ask any dominican if they are black,you will get cursed out.
 
Old 03-01-2010, 12:00 AM
 
Location: Long Island/NYC
11,334 posts, read 17,117,270 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerseygal4u View Post
But,they don't acknowledge they are black. Just ask any dominican if they are black,you will get cursed out.
You're right, I never understood that.
 
Old 03-01-2010, 12:55 AM
 
Location: USA
4,801 posts, read 4,245,523 times
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"Black" is a culture or ethnicity and not so much a race (in scientific terms). To me, black = African American, as in: descended from slaves, originally from the South, collard greens and cornbread, etc. People of African descent but from outside the USA may look like American blacks but they aren't the same, so it seems strange to call them black. Barack Obama apparently identifies himself with the American black culture, but I don't consider him to be black in the fullest sense.

I have problems with the premise of whiteness as well. I identify strongly with the European nationalities that I am descended from and I don't consider myself to be the same as people from other parts of the continent. I am lumped into the "white" category and am thus separate from "black" and "Asian" and others, but I don't really think I'm closer to (say) Swedish-descended people than I am to people descended from Africa or Asia.
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