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Old 03-01-2010, 06:06 AM
 
Location: NC/IL/MI
3,625 posts, read 7,169,823 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by It'sAutomatic View Post
"Black" is a culture or ethnicity and not so much a race (in scientific terms). To me, black = African American, as in: descended from slaves, originally from the South, collard greens and cornbread, etc. People of African descent but from outside the USA may look like American blacks but they aren't the same, so it seems strange to call them black. Barack Obama apparently identifies himself with the American black culture, but I don't consider him to be black in the fullest sense.

I have problems with the premise of whiteness as well. I identify strongly with the European nationalities that I am descended from and I don't consider myself to be the same as people from other parts of the continent. I am lumped into the "white" category and am thus separate from "black" and "Asian" and others, but I don't really think I'm closer to (say) Swedish-descended people than I am to people descended from Africa or Asia.
people from jamaica hati negiria and kenya ect ARE black. But their not technically african american. For example someone who is from nigeria or whos parents are from nigeria would be considered Nigerian-American. Brrack obama is technically kenyan american but since this is the usa and people have to be put in groups they just say he's african american. That dont mean he's not black (or in his case half black).

mas23

 
Old 03-01-2010, 06:40 AM
 
Location: from houstoner to bostoner to new yorker to new jerseyite ;)
4,085 posts, read 11,451,914 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerseygal4u View Post
But,they don't acknowledge they are black. Just ask any dominican if they are black,you will get cursed out.
That is true of many Dominicans, yes, but not all, and I haven't found it true of other Afro-Latinos, Haitians, Cape Verdeans, or Brazilians. That's not to say these groups don't maintain pride in their native countries or a social hierarchy based on skin complexion and features there. But here in America they seem to realize they are regarded as black (Latinos) by white people in the U.S. (not discussing new immigrants necessarily, but the second, third, fourth... generation Americanized people I know) and have assimilated more into black/Latino culture than white, while also maintaining their separate respective cultures. They may not feel they themselves are black, and they're not black as in black Americans, but they 'mix' with other blacks and Afro-Latinos and share common experiences more, for the most part, compared to their mestizo counterparts out west. I don't really see how you can argue against that.

Last edited by houstoner; 03-01-2010 at 06:53 AM..
 
Old 03-02-2010, 12:29 PM
 
56,582 posts, read 80,870,855 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bostoner View Post
That is true of many Dominicans, yes, but not all, and I haven't found it true of other Afro-Latinos, Haitians, Cape Verdeans, or Brazilians. That's not to say these groups don't maintain pride in their native countries or a social hierarchy based on skin complexion and features there. But here in America they seem to realize they are regarded as black (Latinos) by white people in the U.S. (not discussing new immigrants necessarily, but the second, third, fourth... generation Americanized people I know) and have assimilated more into black/Latino culture than white, while also maintaining their separate respective cultures. They may not feel they themselves are black, and they're not black as in black Americans, but they 'mix' with other blacks and Afro-Latinos and share common experiences more, for the most part, compared to their mestizo counterparts out west. I don't really see how you can argue against that.
Exactly and it is pretty obvious when looking at the living patterns in many cities in the Northeast.
 
Old 03-02-2010, 12:30 PM
 
56,582 posts, read 80,870,855 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mas23 View Post
people from jamaica hati negiria and kenya ect ARE black. But their not technically african american. For example someone who is from nigeria or whos parents are from nigeria would be considered Nigerian-American. Brrack obama is technically kenyan american but since this is the usa and people have to be put in groups they just say he's african american. That dont mean he's not black (or in his case half black).

mas23
Another thing that you would think people would obviously know.
 
Old 03-02-2010, 12:31 PM
 
56,582 posts, read 80,870,855 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerseygal4u View Post
But,they don't acknowledge they are black. Just ask any dominican if they are black,you will get cursed out.
Some do and some don't. It depends with Dominicans in terms of when they get here and the complexion/background too.

That still doesn't change the social reality when it comes to how they are viewed in this society, in general, though.
 
Old 03-02-2010, 12:36 PM
 
56,582 posts, read 80,870,855 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bostoner View Post
It stood out to me immediately coming from Texas, where most black people speak only English, not Spanish, French, Haitian Creole, Cape Verdean Creole, or Portuguese. If you dropped many of them off in Texas, most people there wouldn't know they aren't "just black" until they opened their mouths! These groups mix together here much more with each other and with black Americans than the blacks and mestizo Latinos of TX and CA.

I forgot to mention there are a lot of Brazilians and Dominicans in this area, too.
Yep....People forget about the large Cape Verdean communities in MA, CT and RI. Especially New Bedford, Waterbury, Boston, Providence, Pawtucket and some other communities in those three states. There are some in NY too. Just look for surnames that generally end with -es or -os or an a.
 
Old 03-03-2010, 03:21 PM
 
Location: Armsanta Sorad
5,660 posts, read 6,852,248 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
I believe California is losing more blacks than gaining. You have lots of blacks from CA in TX; I've heard lots of them say they are just here temporarily and hoping to return back home.
Hoping to return back to California?
 
Old 03-03-2010, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,674,548 times
Reputation: 7280
Quote:
Originally Posted by West of Encino View Post
Hoping to return back to California?
Yeah.
 
Old 03-03-2010, 08:58 PM
 
Location: Chicago metro
3,507 posts, read 7,312,845 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Infamous92 View Post
You're right, I never understood that.
I think part of the reason is many Latin American countries don't put an emphasis on racial classification like here in America. In Mexico, they don't even put your race on birth certificates. I think when Hispanic culture people come here, they are confused in what racial classification they belong into. There is no one drop rule in Latin America either. Hispanics who have some black features are taken back that they're called black in the USA, while in Latin America they would be seen as mulatto, pardo, etc.
 
Old 03-03-2010, 09:09 PM
 
Location: Chicago metro
3,507 posts, read 7,312,845 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
If you're talking about the plethora of storefront churches in some neighborhoods, I might be inclined to agree but for a totally different reason.




How'd you know they were there anyway? You're not going to see "First Atheist Church" or something to let you know, LOL.
You're right about that, but I doubt there are millions of black atheists in America. I looked at some 2007 stats that said 88-90% of African Americans are affiliated with Christianity and only 0.5% identified as an atheist.

Here is the link
Pew Forum: A Religious Portrait of African-Americans
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