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Old 11-10-2009, 01:08 PM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,129,272 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
San Francisco and Oakland have a different accent from San Jose? Never thought about that. Interesting.

Say hope u don't mind, I put it on SSP(but I did give you credit).
I don't buy it. Probably a result of sampling (or lack thereof). They probably missed the outer communities completely, and subsequently, lumped them in with hinterlands and beyond.

The so called "Bay Area" dialect is what you get with a mishmash of people from other places (some of them overseas) all being mixed in together.
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Old 11-10-2009, 01:11 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpterp View Post
Remember that it's upstate New York (not the city) and heavily blue-collar NW New Jersey.
To be honest, when I, with my Southwestern ear, hear people from places as disparate as Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, Buffalo or Rochester, I really can't tell them apart. I've sometimes heard someone, and assumed they were from the Eastern end of that swath, only to find they are from the Western end, and vice versa. And many cases in between.
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Old 11-10-2009, 09:09 PM
j33
 
4,625 posts, read 12,864,128 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BayAreaHillbilly View Post
To be honest, when I, with my Southwestern ear, hear people from places as disparate as Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, Buffalo or Rochester, I really can't tell them apart. I've sometimes heard someone, and assumed they were from the Eastern end of that swath, only to find they are from the Western end, and vice versa. And many cases in between.
It is because people from these areas all share a similar dialect feature known as the Northern Cities Vowel Shift, which accounts for some similarities in speech despite how far about some of these cities are.

Wiki gives a good run down of this little linguistic feature here

Northern cities vowel shift - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 11-11-2009, 07:48 AM
 
Location: SW Pennsylvania
821 posts, read 1,253,531 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by j33 View Post
It is because people from these areas all share a similar dialect feature known as the Northern Cities Vowel Shift, which accounts for some similarities in speech despite how far about some of these cities are.

Wiki gives a good run down of this little linguistic feature here

Northern cities vowel shift - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
That is a good map. I can hear the Northern cities vowel shift when I go to Cleveland, which isn't that far away from southwest PA/Pittsburgh.

Erie, PA sits between Cleveland and Buffalo but somehow, the NCVS is not noticeable there.

To me, the areas in the northern cities vowel shift and northward into New England are the true northern accents. When I go into those areas, I am reminded of my "different" accent. (I grew up an hour or so south of Pittsburgh though which sounds more like rural PA than Pittsburghese.)

I've been told by a New Englander that the southwest PA accent sounds southern to them.
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Old 11-11-2009, 08:25 AM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,562,228 times
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This is a great map. It correctly shows dialects in Southwestern/Southern Michigan, with Niles, Constantine, Edwardsburg and other immediate southern border areas with Indiana with the Indiana accent, my hometown of Three Rivers right on the border of Indiana Midland and Inland North, and Kalamazoo/Battle Creek and points north with the Inland North.

My only question is with how far east the Inland North goes. It is saying New Jersey has the same accent as Michigan, which is not true at all. Everyone I've met from Jersey had either a New York or Philly accent, and sounded nothing like people from Michigan. Upstate New Yorkers do sound a lot like Michiganders, however.
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Old 11-11-2009, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,562,228 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tallydude02 View Post
That is a good map. I can hear the Northern cities vowel shift when I go to Cleveland, which isn't that far away from southwest PA/Pittsburgh.

Erie, PA sits between Cleveland and Buffalo but somehow, the NCVS is not noticeable there.

To me, the areas in the northern cities vowel shift and northward into New England are the true northern accents. When I go into those areas, I am reminded of my "different" accent. (I grew up an hour or so south of Pittsburgh though which sounds more like rural PA than Pittsburghese.)

I've been told by a New Englander that the southwest PA accent sounds southern to them.
It sounds southern to me as well, and I'm from Michigan. Cleveland's accent is different than ours here in Michigan; it is somewhat similar with the NCVS but has much more of a "southern" influence. I'm always able to pick out a Clevelander/Ohioan.
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Old 11-11-2009, 08:33 AM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,135 posts, read 21,875,914 times
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Default Most American States

Quote:
Originally Posted by cpterp View Post
Wow, good stuff. great post. Looks like the only place in the US that speaks "American" is Iowa/Nebraska lol.
What is interesting to me about that is that my brother was in the Air Force for years and his children settled into those two states. Or his oldest son and his son did. Could they be the most American states. I am still blaming Iowa for Obama. We all need to vote in the primary on the same day and maybe we would do better with our selection process.

I have a problem with anyone saying they speak with no accent. Think about our beginnings in the United States. Which colony was first, second, third, etc. Shouldn't that be the most American accent. And I also have a problem with saying that certain ways to say a word are correct and others are accented. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timelin...States_history

One day I was watching QVC and the sweet lady talking was saying the word "our" over and over again and it was really irritating to me because she was saying the letter "R" instead of "our" that to me is pronounced the same as the word "hour." So I check in the dictionary and she was off, but she was not as far off as I thought. The dictionary said it shoud be "ar" and a couple other ways which both started with a. Now who decided that? I think I pronounce it correctly to pronounce it the way it is spelled and I am not going to stop saying it the way it is spelled. Makes one think that it is a system of possession being 9/10 of the law. The book is written somewhere and they make the decisions?

I took an oral communications course many years ago. It was taught by a public speaker who traveled around the country with a group that talked to many business leaders. He said the most important thing when you speak is to make sure the people you are talking to can understand what you are saying. Accent, grammar, etc. are relative. Just make sure you get the point across. It was even suggested that when you advertise that you might sometimes do it wrong on purpose; as long as it does not change the meaning of what you are saying, such as giving the wrong price of an item, therefore making it a cause for discussion. That gives your advertising mileage.

The way we talk is a product of all our life experiences, so enjoy our differences and relate with the things we have in common. I think attitude is much more important than speech. I was helped this week at AAA by a young lady who was very difficult to communicate with, but she was so sweet and her personality was contagious. Talking with her was a pleasure.

Last edited by NCN; 11-11-2009 at 09:36 AM..
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Old 11-13-2009, 03:01 PM
 
395 posts, read 910,007 times
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I think that huge area in pink referred to simply as "South" is far too generalized.
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Old 11-14-2009, 08:11 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,982 posts, read 102,540,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scalpy McScalperson View Post
I used to work in the tourism industry and I met people from all over the country and by far the most prominent accents are:

Jersey: Stereotypical Jersey accent
Brooklyn: Same
Minnesota: Think of the woman from the movie Fargo "Don't You Know?"
Boston: "Pahk the Cah"
New Orleans: Kind of French influence
Canadian accent is only distinguishable by the word "sorry

Interesting story, some woman was talking to my little brother in the Walmart one time and I thought she was mentality handicapped. Turns out she was just Cajun. LOL. Yes she spoke exactly like the Waterboy's Mother! LOL
The accent in "Fargo" was quite exaggerated. My mother from Wisconsin said "sorry" as it rhymes with "story".

Quote:
Originally Posted by tallydude02 View Post
That is a good map. I can hear the Northern cities vowel shift when I go to Cleveland, which isn't that far away from southwest PA/Pittsburgh.

Erie, PA sits between Cleveland and Buffalo but somehow, the NCVS is not noticeable there.

To me, the areas in the northern cities vowel shift and northward into New England are the true northern accents. When I go into those areas, I am reminded of my "different" accent. (I grew up an hour or so south of Pittsburgh though which sounds more like rural PA than Pittsburghese.)

I've been told by a New Englander that the southwest PA accent sounds southern to them.
Some people from Erie, PA do have the NCVS. I would agree that some of the SW PA accent is a bit southern. "Hah hills" for "high heels", "Stillers" for "Steelers", etc.
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Old 11-14-2009, 10:15 PM
 
Location: right under the ceiling fan ;)
597 posts, read 1,127,876 times
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Great map!
I think it is so cool how NE has so many dialects It is also fascinating how the western states all pretty much speak the same dialect. I honestly thought that the LA area (Southern CA) differred from AZ, I mean no bust on anyone when I say that, I truly did think that about the west. I just love learning about different cultures and in a way the different dialects is like a different culture. Thanks again for posting this map, cool find!
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