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Old 11-09-2009, 09:33 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ReluctantGardenStater View Post
Maine, really? I'm curious as to why you named Maine.
It might be a southern ME/northern ME thing, but it's a little imbalanced. Almost all of the population of the state of Maine is in the southern half (Portland, Lewiston,Augusta, Portland suburbs), leading up to the east-central city of Bangor. North of Bangor, there's the town of Caribou, and Presque Isle, and very little else, besides timber, and potato fields in Aroostock County.
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Old 11-09-2009, 09:50 PM
 
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I get the point about Memphis, but I see Tennessee more about gradations rather than contrast. If you charted TN politically, racially, or perhaps culturally, you wouldn't see sharp lines, more of a gradual change as you moved across the state.
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Old 11-09-2009, 10:06 PM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ReluctantGardenStater View Post
Maine, really? I'm curious as to why you named Maine.
Southern ME has the highest population densities and a lot more representation. Northern ME is very rural, has little representation, and gets the short end of the stick when it comes to increased taxes and regulations. Northern ME has the lowest population densities of nearly any area east of the Mississippi River. It is the polar opposite of the coastal I-95 corridor in SW Maine that runs through Mass.
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Old 11-09-2009, 10:08 PM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimrob1 View Post
I definitely agree with California and Oregon. Oregon is a world unto itself and not always in a good way.
Look at the out-migration trends in rural Oregon. Many counties there were already at a frontier population level and now they are aging out. I also read somewhere that in the past the Portland newspaper tended to cover only localized issues in the metro area and surrounding cities while completely ignoring the eastern half of the state?
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Old 11-10-2009, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Lakeland, Florida
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As I said before Oregon is a place unto itself. When one moves into Oregon especially Portland they can become overwhelmed with the constant Radical politics of the region. Yet just a few miles out of the city the region becomes very conservative, and its amazing how fast that occurance happens.

I think there is way to much focus on Portland in this state and its not healthy for the rest of the state. Definitely polarized. Both Eastern and Southern Oregon have little to say concerning how this state is run. I have to admit I think with Oregon it would have been better to have made it a National Park area. A natural beautiful area of the country with its mountains, Rivers, Valleys and the beautiful coast. Oregon is a sparesly populated state with its communities isolated by distance and politics, and lack of a proper economy equals polarization. I dont' see the purpose for this state in the USA other than its beauty, and again should have been the nations largest National Park.
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Old 11-10-2009, 09:36 AM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,331,660 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WestbankNOLA View Post
Charlotte vs. North Carolina
Not really. Some might even say the Triangle is more liberal/progressive than Charlotte. Charlotte is the state's largest city for sure, but having three 1 million+ urban regions distributed throughout the state prevents it from having an overwhelmingly dominating presence on the rest of the state.
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Old 11-10-2009, 12:52 PM
 
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California - Rich (in some cases, very, very rich), an embattled and shrinking middle class, and then, an underclass either serving the rich or living on the dole.

That's pretty danged polarized in the economic sense, and getting worse by the day.
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Old 11-12-2009, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Somewhere extremely awesome
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
Detroit is known for some good things I think. It's just that most of those were at their best 40 years ago or more and have since declined in importance or value. Like Motown and General Motors.
Michigan is definitely polarized, but I don't think as many Michiganders truly hate Detroit as much as you might think. It's more like dealing with a drug-addicted family member - sure, he drives you nuts and you don't want to talk with him unless you absolutely have to, but he's still YOUR drug-addicted relative and you won't tolerate anybody else picking on him. Plus the city of Detroit itself is less than 1/10 of Michigan's population - not really enough to polarize.

I'd say the major polarization in Michigan is the southeast part of the state (metro Detroit) vs. the western part of the state (Grand Rapids and surrounding areas.)
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Old 11-13-2009, 03:56 AM
 
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Louisiana.
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Old 11-13-2009, 06:03 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
3,077 posts, read 5,451,128 times
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Quote:
Michigan is definitely polarized, but I don't think as many Michiganders truly hate Detroit as much as you might think. It's more like dealing with a drug-addicted family member - sure, he drives you nuts and you don't want to talk with him unless you absolutely have to, but he's still YOUR drug-addicted relative and you won't tolerate anybody else picking on him. Plus the city of Detroit itself is less than 1/10 of Michigan's population - not really enough to polarize.

I'd say the major polarization in Michigan is the southeast part of the state (metro Detroit) vs. the western part of the state (Grand Rapids and surrounding areas.)
This is very accurate. Can't really improve on this post.
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