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Old 11-08-2009, 05:36 PM
 
Location: Germantown, MD
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The quaint towns and history. Also, the only states in the country where the rural areas are also liberal. Plus, the best schools are located there.
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Old 11-08-2009, 07:45 PM
 
Location: New Hampshire
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
Although one small element maybe under-covered is New England I think received more Irish-Irish or Southern Irish than many to most other regions of the US. Due to that New England has a higher amount of lapsed Catholics or ex-Catholics than other regions and lapsed Catholics tend to be among the most socially liberal people. Also New England, going back to the Puritans, tended to be willing to believe society should be remade for the better. So they supported abolitionism, the Progressive movement, and now social liberalism.
I think the Catholic influence is definitely important in New England, although it isn't solely due to the Irish -- after all, they are one of the more widespread ethnic groups in the US. Italian immigration was also very important, although the same can be said for other parts of the Northeast. Two extremely important additional sources of Catholic immigrants to New England were Québec and, to a lesser extent, Portugal.
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Old 11-08-2009, 08:54 PM
 
5,727 posts, read 9,090,851 times
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Originally Posted by cpterp View Post
The quaint towns and history. Also, the only states in the country where the rural areas are also liberal. Plus, the best schools are located there.
Not entirely true. I'm a native New Englander and I've found that most of the people in rural New England tend to be registered Democrats that are middle of the road on social issues and fiscally conservative. You will find a small percentage of the population in rural areas to hold liberal ideas but these usually are in or near college towns in the smaller cities like Hanover, NH, Middlebury, VT, Keene, NH, Brattleboro, VT, Northampton, MA etc. Once you get into the counties that are not really associated with a college and you'll find a lot of traditional Yankees that are not supportive of a Liberal agenda.
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Old 11-08-2009, 09:02 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
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Originally Posted by cpterp View Post
The quaint towns and history. Also, the only states in the country where the rural areas are also liberal. Plus, the best schools are located there.
Even the rural areas are liberal? This is news to me. Maybe my wife and I should investigate New England as an alternative to northern CA. I favor any region that is liberal and places a high value on education.
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Old 11-08-2009, 09:21 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
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I am from Michgian, and from my experience with New England they seem so cold and down to business. They do not like small talk, or making eye contact. They do not seem to like people from other parts of the nation either. I got the sense that they seem to like living in thier own little world over there. Ive been to 46 states and all of New England seems about as foriegn from Michigan as you can get in the USA. Even the south, known for its distinctive culture is more similar to the midwest than New England. The Accents they have there are sometimes tough to understand, escpecially in Fall River Mass. Funny how they call Worchester "Wooster", never figured that out. I am thinking of going out there again on vacation so my wife can see it, Im hoping to get a better feeling from the people next time. Being a midwesterner im sure I just dont get them, and they dont get me. Oh well, at least its very pretty out there.
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Old 11-08-2009, 09:45 PM
 
Location: 30-40°N 90-100°W
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Originally Posted by Alexus View Post
Even the rural areas are liberal? This is news to me. Maybe my wife and I should investigate New England as an alternative to northern CA. I favor any region that is liberal and places a high value on education.
I think there's still a bit of variety on that. Piscataquis County, Maine went for McCain and recently every town in the county voted in favor of "Question 1", which opposed same-sex marriage in Maine, with 60% or more. Which gave me some hope as I've always wanted to visit Maine, but figured it was too liberal for me.

Anyway I think New Hampshire also has some moderately conservative, although maybe more like libertarian, rural areas. McCain didn't win a single county in New Hampshire, but Belknap was pretty close and Bush had received a majority in Belknap both times he ran. The last Democrat, before Obama, to win Belknap was Johnson in 1964. The majority of state legislators for Belknap are still Republican if I'm reading things right. Carroll County, New Hampshire had reportedly been won by the Republican from 1916 to 2004. Rockingham County also seems to tend Republican, but Dole and McCain both lost the county. I believe Derry, New Hampshire (in Rockingham) was one of the largest New England towns to be won by McCain.

I think in the rest of New England rural places seem to be more liberal than American average so far as I can tell. Possibly Essex County, Vermont is a bit more conservative than the rest of the state, but then again maybe not.
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Old 11-09-2009, 04:56 AM
 
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Funnily enough, despite its current reputation, Vermont was dominated by the Republicans until recently. I think the change was due to an influx of urban liberals from NYC and other placers who wanted to go "organic". That changed the demography of the state.
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Old 11-09-2009, 07:19 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
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I dislike droughts.

I like having water available to us on our farm.

Water availability was a big part of us choosing Maine.
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Old 11-09-2009, 07:35 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia,New Jersey, NYC!
6,967 posts, read 18,213,204 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
I am from Michgian, and from my experience with New England they seem so cold and down to business. They do not like small talk, or making eye contact. They do not seem to like people from other parts of the nation either. I got the sense that they seem to like living in thier own little world over there. Ive been to 46 states and all of New England seems about as foriegn from Michigan as you can get in the USA. Even the south, known for its distinctive culture is more similar to the midwest than New England. The Accents they have there are sometimes tough to understand, escpecially in Fall River Mass. Funny how they call Worchester "Wooster", never figured that out. I am thinking of going out there again on vacation so my wife can see it, Im hoping to get a better feeling from the people next time. Being a midwesterner im sure I just dont get them, and they dont get me. Oh well, at least its very pretty out there.
that's because they think that the rest of the country is inferior.
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Old 11-09-2009, 08:15 AM
 
Location: Germantown, MD
1,359 posts, read 3,277,517 times
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Originally Posted by WILWRadio View Post
Not entirely true. I'm a native New Englander and I've found that most of the people in rural New England tend to be registered Democrats that are middle of the road on social issues and fiscally conservative. You will find a small percentage of the population in rural areas to hold liberal ideas but these usually are in or near college towns in the smaller cities like Hanover, NH, Middlebury, VT, Keene, NH, Brattleboro, VT, Northampton, MA etc. Once you get into the counties that are not really associated with a college and you'll find a lot of traditional Yankees that are not supportive of a Liberal agenda.
Well, I didn't mean that most of them were liberal. It's just that New England has a higher proportion of rural liberals than any other area in the country, even if it is as low as say 10% (not that it is).
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