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Old 11-12-2009, 02:37 PM
 
7,598 posts, read 9,451,506 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidyankee764 View Post
I should've said NYC metro culture. Manhattan is just the center of it all.

Why should CTers turn their back on it? That's a very snobby comment IMO (Edited to add: I'm not surprised to realize you come from Boston with that comment). They head to the northern suburbs in CT and Westchester looking for good schools and they very much contribute to the local economy. CTers are not like the backwoods folks who hate anyone new who comes to town. They are very progressive and open-minded, and will embrace just about anyone who comes in so long as they are an upstanding citizen and tolerant themselves.

And I'm not sure what you mean when you say "no it isn't", because NJ is nothing like Long Island, and both are nothing like Westchester. The NYC area has many different feels to it. CT certainly looks much different than the rest of the metro, you can actually see the difference the second you cross the line from Westchester to CT. But as for local mindset, it's very much NYC-oriented in southern CT.

Why are so many Bostonians so adamant about CT *not* being part of the NYC Metro, especially when greater than 50% of the state's population lies within the metro? Any Massachusetts folks care to shed some light?
...MA resident here, and I'm not adamant about this at all. I realize that cities like New Haven, Bridgeport, Norwalk, etc are more oriented to NYC, and that Hartford is probably the "dividing line".

I think that it's largely a "baseball" issue..
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Old 11-12-2009, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia,New Jersey, NYC!
6,967 posts, read 18,211,511 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MassVt View Post
...MA resident here, and I'm not adamant about this at all. I realize that cities like New Haven, Bridgeport, Norwalk, etc are more oriented to NYC, and that Hartford is probably the "dividing line".

I think that it's largely a "baseball" issue..
oh yeah, its definitely "Yankee" country

CT is definitely the wildcard state in NE
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Old 11-12-2009, 03:47 PM
 
908 posts, read 1,815,333 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bostoner View Post
Well, I wouldn't go that far. That's only true of some parts, mostly cities like Houston, which is probably the worst offender. It's a large city that doesn't seem to care that it suffers from unchecked growth. People there mostly think any and all growth is a good thing, due to the humid climate and lack of natural beauty. They figure what else do they have to draw people? But much of rural Texas isn't covered with billboards
You're right, I should have clarified my comment on Texas as being directed at the metro areas of Houston-Sugarland (10,000 sq mi) and DFW (9,000 sq mi). But both metropolises are so sprawling and big area-wise that when added together they are twice the size as the entire state of Massachusetts (10,000 sq mi). Scary thought, huh?

The line about hypocrisy was referring to my experiences in Texas such as a sermon I heard at a Houston church about the decadence of Northeastern liberalism and abortion education, etc. It just makes me want to cringe, when to get to that church, I had to drive around the curb of a giant condom-shaped Zone D'Erotica store.


The nice part of Houston by the Galleria

It's my opinion that many people in New England adopt a less politicized form of conservatism that is not about party affiliation, class or religion. This New England conservatism shared by Democrats and Republicans alike is about having a reserved and responsible take on life.

Last edited by Guineas; 11-12-2009 at 04:02 PM..
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Old 11-13-2009, 05:46 AM
 
Location: from houstoner to bostoner to new yorker to new jerseyite ;)
4,085 posts, read 11,453,292 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Guineas View Post
You're right, I should have clarified my comment on Texas as being directed at the metro areas of Houston-Sugarland (10,000 sq mi) and DFW (9,000 sq mi). But both metropolises are so sprawling and big area-wise that when added together they are twice the size as the entire state of Massachusetts (10,000 sq mi). Scary thought, huh?

The line about hypocrisy was referring to my experiences in Texas such as a sermon I heard at a Houston church about the decadence of Northeastern liberalism and abortion education, etc. It just makes me want to cringe, when to get to that church, I had to drive around the curb of a giant condom-shaped Zone D'Erotica store.


The nice part of Houston by the Galleria

It's my opinion that many people in New England adopt a less politicized form of conservatism that is not about party affiliation, class or religion. This New England conservatism shared by Democrats and Republicans alike is about having a reserved and responsible take on life.
There are some nice parts around there, true, mostly in the residential areas. But I find the commercial areas along the Richmond strip and Westheimer around there some of the ugliest in the city. Not sure I would call that picture nice!

I trust that that was your experience. As a non-churchgoer who lived inside the loop and rarely ventured out if I could help it, I didn't have those experiences there. But I wouldn't be surprised to hear such in a megachurch in Texas. Still, Houston is only around 25% Protestant, I think, and something like half the population is unaffiliated with any religion. The main religion there is the pursuit of money, which everyone practices or aspires to. I've lived too many places to ascribe certain behaviors as occurring along party lines or however we're looking to divide ourselves these days. Sure, some places are better fits than others, which is why I'm here now and not there, but there isn't all bad, and can't be reduced to one or two experiences. We are more alike than different no matter where we live.
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Old 11-13-2009, 06:29 AM
 
Location: Boston, MA
11,739 posts, read 8,305,781 times
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[quote]
Quote:
Originally Posted by john_starks View Post
that's because it feels like Westchester. southern Connecticut along 95 (and including places like Danbury) totally feel like a NY suburb. what do you call Greenwhich, Stamford, Norwalk, New Canaan, Farfield, Bridgeport? and don't forget that its a part of the L.I. sound.
I call it....Connecticut.

Quote:
Bridgeport is like an extension of the Bronx
Not really. The Bronx is now a lively, urban, multi-ethnic, hip part of the city. I don't see that in Bridgeport at all.
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Old 11-13-2009, 06:45 AM
 
Location: Coastal Northeast
16,737 posts, read 23,166,303 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Joshua View Post

I call it....Connecticut.
Just as you'd call Jersey City, Old Bridge, Freehold and Montvale....New Jersey. All still part of the NYC Metro.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Joshua View Post
Not really. The Bronx is now a lively, urban, multi-ethnic, hip part of the city. I don't see that in Bridgeport at all.
That's the first time I've heard the Bronx be described as such. Are you sure you're not confusing it with Brooklyn?

You really have no idea what you're talking about. A quick look at your posting history reaffirms this.
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Old 11-13-2009, 07:19 AM
 
Location: Boston, MA
11,739 posts, read 8,305,781 times
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[quote]
Quote:
Originally Posted by kidyankee764 View Post
I should've said NYC metro culture. Manhattan is just the center of it all.
NYC Metro culture all the way to the RI border? That's still ridiculous. I have been in many places in CT and anything east of I-91 is beautiful, rural New England. That includes all of the coastal cities east of New Haven. I would also add that anything north and nw of Hartford is New England, with the exception of maybe Torrance, NYC can have that if it wants. I look at Connecticut as the New England state with the most people who commute to New York, that's it!

Quote:
Why should CTers turn their back on it? That's a very snobby comment IMO (Edited to add: I'm not surprised to realize you come from Boston with that comment). They head to the northern suburbs in CT and Westchester looking for good schools and they very much contribute to the local economy. CTers are not like the backwoods folks who hate anyone new who comes to town. They are very progressive and open-minded, and will embrace just about anyone who comes in so long as they are an upstanding citizen and tolerant themselves.
Meanwhile Hartford is the murder capital of New England with almost twice Boston's rate. Good luck with that!

Quote:
And I'm not sure what you mean when you say "no it isn't", because NJ is nothing like Long Island, and both are nothing like Westchester. The NYC area has many different feels to it. CT certainly looks much different than the rest of the metro, you can actually see the difference the second you cross the line from Westchester to CT. But as for local mindset, it's very much NYC-oriented in southern CT.
In other words you watch New York TV news and root for teams that purchase..er..um..win championships.

Quote:
Why are so many Bostonians so adamant about CT *not* being part of the NYC Metro, especially when greater than 50% of the state's population lies within the metro? Any Massachusetts folks care to shed some light?
When some CTers actually feel confident enough to say that they are from the great state of Connecticut rather than the 6th borough of NYC.
It's like clockwork. As soon as a thread like "What is New England like?" comes along, some CTer has to post something along the lines of: "Well we wouldn't know, we're from Connecticut and we're more tied to NYC than to New England".

BTW Connecticut is not a part of the NYC Metropolitan Area
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Old 11-13-2009, 07:21 AM
 
5,727 posts, read 9,089,585 times
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A portion of Eastern Kansas is part of the Kansas City metro area but it is politically, socially and culturally different to a degree from the Missouri side. The same logic applies to SW CT. Similar but not the same as NY.
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Old 11-13-2009, 07:23 AM
 
5,727 posts, read 9,089,585 times
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[quote=Mr. Joshua;11608787]
Quote:

NYC Metro culture all the way to the RI border? That's still ridiculous. I have been in many places in CT and anything east of I-91 is beautiful, rural New England. That includes all of the coastal cities east of New Haven. I would also add that anything north and nw of Hartford is New England, with the exception of maybe Torrance, NYC can have that if it wants. I look at Connecticut as the New England state with the most people who commute to New York, that's it!

Meanwhile Hartford is the murder capital of New England with almost twice Boston's rate. Good luck with that!



In other words you watch New York TV news and root for teams that purchase..er..um..win championships.

When some CTers actually feel confident enough to say that they are from the great state of Connecticut rather than the 6th borough of NYC.
It's like clockwork. As soon as a thread like "What is New England like?" comes along, some CTer has to post something along the lines of: "Well we wouldn't know, we're from Connecticut and we're more tied to NYC than to New England".

BTW Connecticut is not a part of the NYC Metropolitan Area

Actually SW CT is considered part of the NYC metro area.

Once you get away from Fairfield County, the rest of CT is more like New England than NY.
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Old 11-13-2009, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Boston, MA
11,739 posts, read 8,305,781 times
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[quote]
Quote:
Originally Posted by kidyankee764 View Post
Just as you'd call Jersey City, Old Bridge, Freehold and Montvale....New Jersey. All still part of the NYC Metro.

That's the first time I've heard the Bronx be described as such. Are you sure you're not confusing it with Brooklyn?
I didn't say that it was safe.

Quote:
You really have no idea what you're talking about. A quick look at your posting history reaffirms this.
What part of my posting history are you referring to? I'm game for debates. We may have to start a kidyankee/mr joshua debate thread though.
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