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Old 11-17-2009, 01:21 PM
 
Location: Heidelberg, Germany
240 posts, read 459,261 times
Reputation: 306

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Please allow me to tell you a bit about me and what I am looking for. I am a guy, mid thirties, living in Germany, with a long term plan of moving to the States.

I have lived in Phoenix, AZ for a year back in 96/97 and still go back to visit my friends there every year.

I like Arizona, don't mind the heat, but Phoenix is a huge metro area, downtown has improved but still hasn't much of a walkable, livable city center. Everything is very spread out and the suburban sprawl is not what I am looking for.

My dream is living in a modest house on a good size lot (1cre+) close to civilazition but not downtown or in a cookie cutter neighbourhood. I think I prefer medium-sized cities or towns over big or small cities.

I actually own a piece of land (5 acres) about an hour drive northwest of Phoenix but I am not sure if that's the place I want to live. Presently the area is very remote and very few people live there but when growth returns to the area things might change.

My girlfriend (future wife?) doesn't like the idea of living in the desert (hasn't visited yest) but also prefers a warm climate.

I have travelled extensivelly throughout the States, dont really like the humidity in Florida, the weather in the north-east, the conservative (religious right) mindset in the midwest etc.

So I think the southwest/southern west coast is where I need to be looking.

My wishlist includes:

mid-sized town (pop. 50-200k)
warm, mostly dry climate
friendly, open minded, people
leaning towards liberal, green, educated, rather than ultra conservative.
things to do for a young(ish) couple
good place for a future family

My girlfriend is a teacher and I am a pilot (corporate/private jets).

I know I am asking a lot but maybe somebody on these forums lives in such a "dream" place and doesn't mind sharing the secret.

Looking forward to hearing from many of you.
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Old 11-17-2009, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Denver
2,923 posts, read 6,027,432 times
Reputation: 2952
You might want to look into Lubbock, Texas. It's a city of about 220,000 that's both a college town and a family-oriented place. It's fairly dry, but it's not desert. It doesn't have the scorching heat of the desert, the humidity in the South, or the cold winters in the North. The city itself is on grassland, but 20 miles to the east, and the landscape looks a lot like the old west, with canyons and mesas. It is largely conservative, yet libertarian, with a "live and let live" attitude, but it's also a college town, so it's becoming more moderate (I know because I'm one myself). It's also fairly diverse for a city its size, with over 100 nationalities represented. I don't know if it's what you had in mind, but I hope it helps. Good luck with your decision.
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Old 11-18-2009, 05:56 AM
 
19,398 posts, read 26,597,308 times
Reputation: 16738
quote:]

My wishlist includes:
mid-sized town (pop. 50-200k)
warm, mostly dry climate
friendly, open minded, people
leaning towards liberal, green, educated, rather than ultra conservative.
things to do for a young(ish) couple
good place for a future family quote:]

Not to sound like a broken record from many of my previous posts, but you've pretty much described
the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill, NC area. Particularly the towns of Chapel Hill and Carrboro. I lived there for 6 years and can't wait to move back, a very friendly place to live with a great quality of life.

Combined the two towns have of a population just over 100,000 and are within 30 minutes of Raleigh (population 350,000)and 15 minutes from Durham (population 185,000). The University of North Carolina is located in Chapel Hill and provides a lot of cultural amenities, as well as an enlightened population as a result. In the last presidential election, true to form, the area voted about 75% democratic. Both towns are very green/environmentally conscious. There is very little crime and the schools are excellent. The area has many options for outdoor activities and a really good restaurant scene. The only caveat is that it's not what would be considered dry. It's very green there as a result of regular rain. Not days on end, maybe once a week on average.

Carrboro, North Carolina Overview
Chapel Hill, North Carolina - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools - CHCCS: Who We are Facts & Figures

Check it out and best of luck to you!
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Old 11-18-2009, 06:44 AM
 
Location: Durham, NC
2,521 posts, read 7,741,122 times
Reputation: 1585
I agree that culturally the Durham-Chapel Hill metro area probably offers what the OP is looking for, however the climate is far from "mostly dry". We averarge 43" of rain per year in this area with a lot of cloudy days as compared to Arizona. While it is warm-to-mild most of the year, the winters are cool, and occasionally cold...again this is especially so when compared to the Phoenix area.

To the OP - might you find what you're looking for near Tucson or Prescott? Areas surrounding Santa Fe, NM? Other than the cold, Flagstaff would also be great.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
quote:]

My wishlist includes:
mid-sized town (pop. 50-200k)
warm, mostly dry climate
friendly, open minded, people
leaning towards liberal, green, educated, rather than ultra conservative.
things to do for a young(ish) couple
good place for a future family quote:]

Not to sound like a broken record from many of my previous posts, but you've pretty much described
the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill, NC area. Particularly the towns of Chapel Hill and Carrboro. I lived there for 6 years and can't wait to move back, a very friendly place to live with a great quality of life.

Combined the two towns have of a population just over 100,000 and are within 30 minutes of Raleigh (population 350,000)and 15 minutes from Durham (population 185,000). The University of North Carolina is located in Chapel Hill and provides a lot of cultural amenities, as well as an enlightened population as a result. In the last presidential election, true to form, the area voted about 75% democratic. Both towns are very green/environmentally conscious. There is very little crime and the schools are excellent. The area has many options for outdoor activities and a really good restaurant scene. The only caveat is that it's not what would be considered dry. It's very green there as a result of regular rain. Not days on end, maybe once a week on average.

Carrboro, North Carolina Overview
Chapel Hill, North Carolina - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools - CHCCS: Who We are Facts & Figures

Check it out and best of luck to you!
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Old 11-18-2009, 09:20 PM
 
6 posts, read 13,346 times
Reputation: 10
I like your wishlist Stefan, except that I want to be somewhere it gets nice and cold and snowy in the winter (preferably near some water), good *affordable* colleges and public transportation.

Last edited by Divorced-with-NYC; 11-18-2009 at 09:55 PM..
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Old 11-18-2009, 10:15 PM
 
Location: Saint Louis City
1,563 posts, read 3,122,539 times
Reputation: 624
I really loved Flagstaff, AZ, but it can get cold. Not sure about the job market there right now, but a beautiful place.
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Old 11-18-2009, 10:53 PM
 
321 posts, read 610,930 times
Reputation: 123
What about Santa Fe?
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Old 11-18-2009, 11:30 PM
 
Location: 602/520
2,441 posts, read 5,771,132 times
Reputation: 1815
How about Reno? It's near Lake Tahoe, not too far from San Francisco, the climate's moderate, the city's liberalish, and the town is not too small, but not too large, either.
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Old 11-19-2009, 12:06 AM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 11,442,108 times
Reputation: 2698
Berkeley, CA maybe? Don't think it's mostly dry out that way, though.
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Old 11-19-2009, 07:19 AM
 
Location: Durham, NC
2,521 posts, read 7,741,122 times
Reputation: 1585
Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
Berkeley, CA maybe? Don't think it's mostly dry out that way, though.
The OP said he'd like to live on a large lot...approx. 1 acre. I think that's going to be tough to find in Berkeley, and even if you can find it the price would be prohibitive.
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