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Old 04-18-2010, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
3,391 posts, read 4,242,538 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Milwaukee City View Post
So here is my question? Can one take pride in their cities population even though their metro maybe small? For instance Milwaukee has 605,000 people in it's city but metro is 2,000,000 at best. So if we are going by city pop Milwaukee is one of the bigger cities right behind Boston at 609,000 and Milwaukee is bigger than Denver and Seattle and St.Louis. Milwaukee is 23rd in terms of city population and when it comes to metro well, we are #32 right next to Columbus, OH. However a lot of people don't consider Columbus a big city.

So can I take pride knowing Milwaukee has a decent city population but a rather weak metro population?

So what's more important? city pop or metro pop? or is city population just a side note?
I think you should just take pride in the fact that Milwaukee is one cool city, at least from what I've heard. I'd like to visit there someday; preferably in the summer, lol.
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Old 04-18-2010, 10:44 AM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,166,272 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by killakoolaide View Post
Metro population is too watered down, it includes too much land area. City proper population are to arbitrary and steeped in old politics, it's usually best to go with whats in a city's beltway(as the limits), because where and how transportation is built is almost purely market driven, and a city's economy is what tells the true story.

But many cities have no beltway; Chicago, NYC, Philadelphia, San Francisco just as examples
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Old 04-18-2010, 10:51 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,251 posts, read 19,550,442 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
But many cities have no beltway; Chicago, NYC, Philadelphia, San Francisco just as examples
Yup, and even though DC does have a beltway, it's a pretty arbitrary boundary, just like the city limits. Folks who live beyond the beltway regularly commute to the city and are connected with it in numerous other ways.
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Old 04-18-2010, 11:27 AM
 
2,420 posts, read 3,986,789 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
But many cities have no beltway; Chicago, NYC, Philadelphia, San Francisco just as examples

Courtesy of phillyroads.com

Kidphilly you of all people should know that while philly doesn't have an officialy recognized "beltway", it does have an encirculing system of Highways which essetially acts as its beltway. 276(PA turnpike) to the north comes around and links up with 476(the blue route) at KOP, 476 continues around down to about media(in delco just south of philly) where it links up to I-95, which runs north and links back up with 276,which is highlighted in the above pic, although one could make the argument that its eastern border is actually 295 in new jersey rather than 95 along the delaware river.

I don't know about NYC and SF, because I don't know those city's like that, but if they don't have a system of highways encirculing them it's probably because of their unique geography. Most major U.S. cities at some point in thier history have recieved major federal funding to build highways around them, so most American cities have beltways, except for maybe special geographic cases like NYC and SF.
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Old 04-18-2010, 01:39 PM
 
Location: The land of Chicago
867 posts, read 1,841,715 times
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metro hands down
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Old 04-18-2010, 08:42 PM
 
Location: MN
3,798 posts, read 8,170,886 times
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There's this something that is annoying about Metros.
Many people will claim they are from the 'city', when in fact they live in that metro, in a suburb, up to 50 miles away... A suburb in a metro 50 miles away almost has nothing to do with the city.
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Old 04-19-2010, 10:08 AM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,166,272 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knke0204 View Post
There's this something that is annoying about Metros.
Many people will claim they are from the 'city', when in fact they live in that metro, in a suburb, up to 50 miles away... A suburb in a metro 50 miles away almost has nothing to do with the city.

Well said - reagional attached and influenced but has zero to do with actual "city" life

IMO if you have a bigger lawn than the footprint of your residence you are "not" living in the city

Last edited by kidphilly; 04-19-2010 at 11:10 AM..
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Old 04-19-2010, 11:06 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,251 posts, read 19,550,442 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knke0204 View Post
A suburb in a metro 50 miles away almost has nothing to do with the city.
Try telling that to an Angelino.
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Old 04-19-2010, 11:39 AM
 
Location: MN
3,798 posts, read 8,170,886 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
Well said - reagional attached and influenced but has zero to do with actual "city" life

IMO if you have a bigger lawn than the footprint of your residence you are "not" living in the city

That's one thing about here in Minnesota. We are odd in the sense that we have only 1 metro in the state. So to Minnesotan's you're simply in-state (metro) or outstate (non metro). There seems to be a superiority complex with those who reside in the Metro area... Since I am temporarily living in the Twin Ports area (Duluth), which is probably the second or 3rd biggest metro in MN, I run across weird situations all the time. Those who live in the metro will hardly ever say I live in ________<---Insert Suburb here. What they do say is I am from "the cities". Minnesota has just the one metro that serves as the nucleus for the state, so you will ALWAYS hear "I'm from the cities" and that usually means that they live in the metro, in a suburb.

So here, at least you don't get that claim of "I'm from Minneapolis", when in fact you live in Burnsville, a suburb 15 miles away. You just hear "I'm from the cities" so you assume that they live in one of the 100 suburbs of Minneapolis/St. Paul.

I have met TONS of people that will say "I'm from Chicago", and be from over an hour away. They don't even say "Chicagoland" they just say Chicago, as if they live there and walk to Cubs games from their apartment, when in fact they are nestled in their suburb, a decent drive or train ride away.

Whenever I'm travelling and I meet people I always say "I'm from a suburb of Minneapolis", and that should paint a picture of "this guy lives in the metro, suburbia, he's not an urbanite who resides in the city limits of a major city"
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Old 08-05-2010, 10:43 PM
 
346 posts, read 652,283 times
Reputation: 220
Sorry but I seem to be in the minority that thinks that city population is far more important, why because when you want to enjoy a good urban vibe of culture, dining, parks, shopping, ect, you don't get that from racing accross a metro area at 70 mph on the freeway, that only comes from the INNER CITY, so inner city pop in a compact area that creates that urban vibe is all that matters to me, there are parts of my cities metro that I still havn't seen and don't want to, and ive lived here all my life
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