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Old 11-20-2009, 04:16 PM
 
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Definitely not the Midwest, whoever said that.

I'm going to say somewhere in California, probably the Inland Empire.
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Old 11-20-2009, 04:49 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by desert sun View Post
the first ones--




and the second ones----




I am going to take a wild guess and say these are from Arizonia or New Mexico and the OP is trying to show that there is a wide variety of houses and landscaping in those states.

All of these houses in fact COULD be literally anywhere. For instance there are actually a few hamlets (Mastic & Shirley) on Long Island that do look like the first picture, but the grass color is wrong and what are those pipes near the street, lol.

In the second picture, the white house on the right does look like a Long Island house but the main house in the picture (with the green trim) does not look typical. Notice the pumpkins on the steps, most NE, Midwest and I think even Southern lawns in the fall should be a lush green not this pale color with the rocks, lol. In fact the "Green Trim House" looks a combination of traditional style mixed with Spanish influence (notice the railings) which makes me think Southwest again.

The second set of photos could be isolated shots of houses ANYWHERE but something says the Southwest or parts of Texas and Califonia to me.

I wonder if the rocks near the street are put there to cut down on the amount of lawn that needs to be watered and also to get rid the lawn which gets the most abuse (near the hot street).
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Old 11-20-2009, 04:58 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in the universe
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We should make this a game. Someone should post pics of some other houses and we have to guess where they are.
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Old 11-20-2009, 07:53 PM
 
Location: USA
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None of the houses have a basement visible, so they are probably in a warm climate where basements are seldom found. The last two pictures of brick houses don't look to be in the southwest. They could be, but that's where they general build houses with stucco exteriors.

The first two pictures could be anywhere from California to Texas or Oklahoma. The last two could possibly be in E. NM, but I have seen some homes styled in like Amarillo, Midland ,or Odessa Tx.
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Old 11-20-2009, 07:59 PM
 
Location: New Mexico to Texas
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the answer is Portales,New Mexico(my hometown)

the reason I asked this is cause the rest of NM dosent have houses like this, only the Eastern side of the state.

the first set-I dont know where else in the US has this style of houses besides TX,I guess I never paid any attention

the second set--pretty much TX style houses

but this was interesting to hear everyones answers
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Old 11-20-2009, 08:15 PM
 
Location: Austin, Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lammius View Post
They all look like Texas to me, especially the second set. I don't think I've seen pictures of houses so low to the ground anywhere else. I've never been to Dallas, but that's what I imagine homes there to look like.

But the second house in the second set looks plain silly to me. It looks like the ground floor (which is literally on the ground here) is being eaten by the top 2/3 of the house. It just looks so out of proportion, all roof and almost no walls. If it were up on a crawlspace of just a few feet, and had some steps leading to the front door, it would look more proportional, IMO.
Out of curiosity, have you ever been to Texas?
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Old 11-20-2009, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Long Island/NYC
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1. The Southwest or Texas/Oklahoma.

2. The Southeast or The Mid-Atlantic.
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Old 11-21-2009, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Concrete jungle where dreams are made of.
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I don't like that look at all. The brown brick looks ugly to me.
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Old 11-22-2009, 10:30 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
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The first set can come from a variety of places. But, due to the landscape, I'd rule out the Southeast, Midwest, Northwest and Northeast. This leaves the West and Southwest. I have seen lots of houses like the first set in California's older communities. I imagine that homes like these can be found in a variety of places that were settled in the early to mid 20th Century.
The second set in particular looks like Texas to me. It can't be California due to the brick. You don't see that much brick in California due to earthquakes. When I lived in Texas, I saw that style of house in a lots of cities. I haven't been to them all, but I have been to many. Stereotype or not, that looks like Texas to me. Some of the key indicators are:
  1. Steep Rooflines
  2. Large overhangs
  3. Brick
  4. Homes built on slabs that sit low to the ground
  5. Large homes

But, I can also imagine that these homes might also be in adjacent states like Oklahoma or NM. I'd put my money on OK before NM but neither would surprise me. But, since I haven't been to these places, it would be hard for me to be sure. The landscape indicates a colder climate with the grass dormant and the trees without leaves. Because of this and the general landscape, I'd lean toward northern Texas/OK/NM before places like Houston.
In the end, I suspect that these homes are all in the same area.
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Old 11-22-2009, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Texas
1,365 posts, read 2,467,362 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
The first set can come from a variety of places. But, due to the landscape, I'd rule out the Southeast, Midwest, Northwest and Northeast. This leaves the West and Southwest. I have seen lots of houses like the first set in California's older communities. I imagine that homes like these can be found in a variety of places that were settled in the early to mid 20th Century.
The second set in particular looks like Texas to me. It can't be California due to the brick. You don't see that much brick in California due to earthquakes. When I lived in Texas, I saw that style of house in a lots of cities. I haven't been to them all, but I have been to many. Stereotype or not, that looks like Texas to me. Some of the key indicators are:
  1. Steep Rooflines
  2. Large overhangs
  3. Brick
  4. Homes built on slabs that sit low to the ground
  5. Large homes

But, I can also imagine that these homes might also be in adjacent states like Oklahoma or NM. I'd put my money on OK before NM but neither would surprise me. But, since I haven't been to these places, it would be hard for me to be sure. The landscape indicates a colder climate with the grass dormant and the trees without leaves. Because of this and the general landscape, I'd lean toward northern Texas/OK/NM before places like Houston.
In the end, I suspect that these homes are all in the same area.
By "northern Texas" do you mean Panhandle Texas? Because these homes don't look like North Texas at all.

Either way, the OP already stated that the answer was New Mexico.
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