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Old 11-22-2009, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Baltimore
1,345 posts, read 3,768,755 times
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Considering L'Enfant purposely designed DC to be just like Paris, I'd say DC. Like the others said, low skyline with a monument sticking out, both very dense, traffic circles and grid streets, and the suburbs are actually similar too. You can see the skyline for La Defense from Paris. From DC you can see skylines for Rosslyn and for Bethesda which both are filled with high rises.
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Old 11-22-2009, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Washington, DC
657 posts, read 1,311,427 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ffknight918 View Post
Considering L'Enfant purposely designed DC to be just like Paris, I'd say DC. Like the others said, low skyline with a monument sticking out, both very dense, traffic circles and grid streets, and the suburbs are actually similar too. You can see the skyline for La Defense from Paris. From DC you can see skylines for Rosslyn and for Bethesda which both are filled with high rises.
Definitely, DC is the most similar to Paris. Heading north on 14th St. along the mall and viewing Pennsylvania Ave is a spectacular vista of the city that "resembles" Paris.
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Old 11-22-2009, 11:57 AM
 
Location: St Louis
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None
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Old 11-22-2009, 03:23 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J'aimeDesVilles View Post
I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to spend a week in Paris recently. As I explored this wonderful city, mostly on foot, I couldn't help but try to make a connection to a city, any city, in North America. I suppose because here in the U.S. our cities are so cookie-cutter that nearly every city (New York excepted) resembles half a dozen other cities. Not surprisingly my quest was futile. Paris is so grand, so old, so unique, so achitecturally striking, and larger than all but two of North America's metropolitan areas. But these are my thoughts on the subject;


So what do you think? I am curious for any thoughts, input from my fellow C-Ders, especially those that have seen Paris, on comparisons of U.S. and Canadian cities to Paris.
I think you need to get out more, I've lived in Paris and traveled all over France... I'm currently hosting a french exchange student, etc. etc. U.S. is quite a bit more diverse... NY the only non cookie cutter city? lololol yah okay guy.

BTW the answer is quebec city..

France and french culture is very provincial compared to the u.s. ...this is straight down from the government, they want everything to be very french. it isn't good or bad, just is what it is.
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Old 11-22-2009, 03:39 PM
 
Location: St Paul, MN - NJ's Gold Coast
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New Orleans, Baltimore, Jersey City...
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Old 11-22-2009, 04:36 PM
 
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Actually the streets of downtown Detroit were laid out in 1805 (after a fire) like the streets of Paris (similar to D.C.) with small circular public spaces with streets radiating outwards.

In Detroit, Campus Martius Park (I think the sailor/soldier monument looks very European IMO) acts as one node and the other is Grand Circus Park, a half circle.

While most of the rest of the city proper has little to see, downtown Detroit is actually nicer than people think.
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Old 11-23-2009, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
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I agree with D.C. Paris provides the splendor in width that New York brings in height. While both are magnificent for the eyes, Paris' low, expanding, historical buildings contrast that of N.Y.C. And while they are both urban and cosmopolitan, giving them a similar feel, aesthetically they contrast one another.

The closest in aesthetic similarities is D.C. Both have numerous historical landmarks and similar architecture, low buildings and few skyscrapers (does D.C. have any?), and are dense and walkable. Their public transpo even remind me of each other.

I wonder, however, if any city can even match Paris in the quantity of architectural beauty? There's really no place I've seen that can compete with it.
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Old 06-07-2011, 07:53 AM
 
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Quite an interesting series of comments, there is a uniqueness to every city that define sit, really... I would say that french canadiands do have stronger ties with France than americans, so they are probably most likely to capture the spirit of Paris. I would like to add another city, although it is not in Nort America at least is is in the Americas. It's name is Buenos Aires (might have heard it somewhere associated with Tango, along with Montevideo). It lacks the open spaces PAris has, but its architecture is just amazingly beautiful. And, it does resemble Paris in many ways (Plaza San Martín, for example, could well be within Paris). It does, however, resemble many other european cities. The XIX and early XX century leaders thought everything local was bad, and everything european was great, so they created a national capital inspired in european capitals.
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Old 06-07-2011, 08:13 AM
 
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I absolutely love Paris and to say that DC resembles Paris is pretty much big insult to the city of lights. DC looks more to me like an ancient Greek city with too many boring white masonry buildings. Quebec City doesn't look like Paris but it has the French vibes that I like.
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Old 06-07-2011, 08:26 AM
 
Location: metro ATL
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Physically, I'd say DC. Culturally, Montreal or QC.
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